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Eyes That Speak to the Stars

by Joanna Ho

Other authors: Dung Ho (Illustrator)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
968253,557 (4.42)2
New York Times bestselling team Joanna Ho and Dung Ho present Eyes That Speak to the Stars, companion to the acclaimed Eyes That Kiss in the Corners. "A brilliant treatise to love of self and heritage." --School Library Journal (starred review) "A beautifully validating book that builds on the necessary work of its predecessor." --Kirkus "Affirmative poetry about a child's eyes and the tale they tell about him. An uplifting read." --Booklist A young boy comes to recognize his own power and ability to change the future. When a friend at school creates a hurtful drawing, the boy turns to his family for comfort. He realizes that his eyes rise to the skies and speak to the stars, shine like sunlit rays, and glimpse trails of light from those who came before--in fact, his eyes are like his father's, his agong's, and his little brother's, and they are visionary. Inspired by the men in his family, he recognizes his own power and strength from within. This extraordinary picture book redefines what it means to be truly you. Eyes That Kiss in the Corners received three starred reviews and was embraced as "breathtaking," "lyrical," and "poignant." This companion volume is sure to be welcomed with equal joy. January/February 2021 Kids' Indie Next List An Amazon January Best Book of the Month… (more)
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» See also 2 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
From Follett
A young Asian boy, who notices that his eyes look different from his friends', realizes that his eyes--like his father's, grandfather's, and younger brother's--rise to the skies, speak to the stars, and are visionary.
  kc32022 | Jan 22, 2023 |
LibraryThing Review:

Words cannot describe the beauty of both the message and the illustrations of this book. When a young boy is hurt/harmed by nasty comments of school mates regarding the shape of his eyes that are not "round," he seeks guidance from his loving father who, upon arriving at home, stood with him in front of a mirror and said "Your eyes rise to the skies and speak to the stars. The comets and constellations show you their secrets, and your eyes can foresee the future. Just like mine."

As they go outside and his father runs with him on his shoulders telling his that he will soar above the clouds if he lifts his arms. And, as they fly while holding kites that rise upward, they are joined by his grandfather, "Agong." The author notes that he feels his Agong's eyes rise to the skies and speak to the stars. It is on this particular page that the illustrations are so very "eye catchingly" beautiful while expressing that the voices of those who have gone on before them are whispering.

His baby brother joins the circle of love, and his eyes are just like his eyes, and those of his father, and his Agong. The paes that follow are so stunningly beautiful that they are breathtaking.

This is a book of solidarity, and of love that reaches through the ages. I found this in my local library. Now, I will purchase a copy for my large, ever-expanding collection of illustrated books.

I find such joy in this genre! These books are a wonderful way for artists to exhibit their incredible talent!
  TallyChan5 | Dec 9, 2022 |
Words cannot describe the beauty of both the message and the illustrations of this book. When a young boy is hurt/harmed by nasty comments of school mates regarding the shape of his eyes that are not "round," he seeks guidance from his loving father who, upon arriving at home, stood with him in front of a mirror and said "Your eyes rise to the skies and speak to the stars. The comets and constellations show you their secrets, and your eyes can foresee the future. Just like mine."

As they go outside and his father runs with him on his shoulders telling his that he will soar above the clouds if he lifts his arms. And, as they fly while holding kites that rise upward, they are joined by his grandfather, "Agong." The author notes that he feels his Agong's eyes rise to the skies and speak to the stars. It is on this particular page that the illustrations are so very "eye catchingly" beautiful while expressing that the voices of those who have gone on before them are whispering.

His baby brother joins the circle of love, and his eyes are just like his eyes, and those of his father, and his Agong. The paes that follow are so stunningly beautiful that they are breathtaking.

This is a book of solidarity, and of love that reaches through the ages. I found this in my local library. Now, I will purchase a copy for my large, ever-expanding collection of illustrated books.

I find such joy in this genre! These books are a wonderful way for artists to exhibit their incredible talent!

Another five-star read! ( )
1 vote Whisper1 | Sep 23, 2022 |
American author Joanna Ho and Vietnamese illustrator Dung Ho, who previously collaborated on the lovely Eyes That Kiss in the Corners return in this second picture-book, once again exploring the beauty of Asian eyes, and the importance of family love and relationships. When a young boy is hurt by a school friend's depiction of him, with two slanted lines as eyes, his father tells him that his eyes "rise to the skies and speak to the stars." Interacting with his father, agong (grandfather) and di-di (younger brother), the boy gains strength and appreciation for his eyes, and for the members of his family.

Having greatly enjoyed Eyes That Kiss in the Corners I picked up Eyes That Speak to the Stars with a great deal of anticipation, and I was not disappointed. Although I wouldn't say that Joanna Ho's narrative here was quite as accomplished as in her first book, it was still immensely appealing, with a poetic quality and a warm-hearted tone that was very pleasing. The artwork from Dung Ho, on the other hand, is every bit as beautiful here as in the earlier book, with a lovely color palette, and wonderfully expressive depictions of the characters. I particularly enjoyed the two-page spreads featuring a backdrop of mythological creatures, from the dragon to the goddess Mazu, and the page on which the narrator appears in front of the constellations was just gorgeous. With a heartwarming look at family love and connection, and a reassuring message about the worth of Asian eyes, there's a lot here to appreciate. Recommended to picture-book audiences in need of the message here, as well as to any that enjoy stories celebrating the beauty of human diversity. ( )
  AbigailAdams26 | Sep 10, 2022 |
A young Chinese American boy discovers himself, his roots, and his potential.

In this poetic celebration of body diversity, family, and Chinese culture, the author picks up on themes introduced in her New York Times bestselling picture book, Eyes That Kiss in the Corners (2021). While the previous title centered female family members, this offering focuses on three generations of male kindred. After a classmate draws an offensive and hurtful picture depicting the boy with slits for eyes, he finds comfort in his father’s affirming words: “Your eyes rise to the skies and speak to the stars. / The comets and constellations / show you their secrets, and your eyes can / foresee the future. / Just like mine.” The boy narrates that his father’s eyes “shine like runway lights” and are just like the eyes of his grandfather, who “holds the wisdom of generations.” He describes how his little brother, Di Di, has eyes just like the male family members who came before him. By finding a mirror in the loved ones whom he so adores and admires, the narrator begins to see that his eyes are powerful and visionary: “My eyes shine like sunlight rays / that break through dark and doubt.” The idea of “looking up” is a repeated textual and visual motif—sophisticated digital illustrations full of flowing lines imply upward movement, and scenes from the grandfather’s memories and his retellings of Chinese tales, as well as scenes of the family spending time together, feature aerial objects like comets and Chinese kites and sky lanterns. The circular narration emphasizes the reassuring similarities between blood relatives and the continuity of family tradition.

A beautifully validating book that builds on the necessary work of its predecessor.
  CDJLibrary | Apr 29, 2022 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Joanna Hoprimary authorall editionscalculated
Ho, DungIllustratorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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New York Times bestselling team Joanna Ho and Dung Ho present Eyes That Speak to the Stars, companion to the acclaimed Eyes That Kiss in the Corners. "A brilliant treatise to love of self and heritage." --School Library Journal (starred review) "A beautifully validating book that builds on the necessary work of its predecessor." --Kirkus "Affirmative poetry about a child's eyes and the tale they tell about him. An uplifting read." --Booklist A young boy comes to recognize his own power and ability to change the future. When a friend at school creates a hurtful drawing, the boy turns to his family for comfort. He realizes that his eyes rise to the skies and speak to the stars, shine like sunlit rays, and glimpse trails of light from those who came before--in fact, his eyes are like his father's, his agong's, and his little brother's, and they are visionary. Inspired by the men in his family, he recognizes his own power and strength from within. This extraordinary picture book redefines what it means to be truly you. Eyes That Kiss in the Corners received three starred reviews and was embraced as "breathtaking," "lyrical," and "poignant." This companion volume is sure to be welcomed with equal joy. January/February 2021 Kids' Indie Next List An Amazon January Best Book of the Month

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