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Sketching User Experiences: Getting the Design Right and the Right Design

by Bill Buxton

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389253,410 (3.94)None
Hardly a day goes by that we don't see a new product or technology that is going to make our lives easier, solve some or all of our problems, or simply make the world a better place. However, the reality is that few new products survive, much less deliver on their promise. But do designers learn from these expensive mistakes? Rather than rethink the underlying process that brings these products to market, the more common strategy is the shotgun approach: keep blasting away in the hope that one new invention will hit the bull's eye.This book's goal is to solve this problem: to inspire a… (more)
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Buxton develops a clearly articulated design perspective on the creation of digital products, based firmly in the seminal activity of sketching. The core part of the book is an inventory of sketching techniques, presented through well-chosen examples and illustrating a breadth of approaches to the key question of how to sketch temporal behavior and interactivity. Buxton lays out two parallel threads to frame the sketching examples – a discussion of professional product development, and a scholarly perspective on the history and significance of sketching in design – which makes the book a highly valuable resource for professional interaction designers as well as teachers and students.
  jonas.lowgren | Dec 11, 2010 |
Some great examples of design and design processes, not too preaching although Buxton believes in the cause. ( )
  miha | Apr 1, 2010 |
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The industrial age is over.
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Hardly a day goes by that we don't see a new product or technology that is going to make our lives easier, solve some or all of our problems, or simply make the world a better place. However, the reality is that few new products survive, much less deliver on their promise. But do designers learn from these expensive mistakes? Rather than rethink the underlying process that brings these products to market, the more common strategy is the shotgun approach: keep blasting away in the hope that one new invention will hit the bull's eye.This book's goal is to solve this problem: to inspire a

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