HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

100 Things You're Not Supposed To Know by…
Loading...

100 Things You're Not Supposed To Know (2004)

by Russell Kick

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
203790,866 (3.41)2
Sheds light on those things that people in power--government, religious leaders, corporations, the rich and well connected--would just as soon wish you didn't know.

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 2 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
At times reaffirming, at other times informative and at still other times, questionable. 100 Things You're Not Supposed to Know is filled with information. Some of it I was aware of and knew to be true, other stuff I looked up to confirm and other stuff just bumped this from a higher rating to a lower because now I am more deeply questioning anything I haven't looked up yet.

There's the false assumption that if some states something as "fact" and backs it with some kind of citation that challenges a long-held belief, the long-held belief was wrong. But it doesn't work that way - it only works that way if the evidence strongly supports the repositioning of a belief. So, the lost nuclear warheads - it's been officially documented and there's no reason to not believe that since it's something the U.S. Government wouldn't benefit from saying. Other things like old laws still on the books are verifiable, just maybe not common knowledge. And still others have been shown to be true long after the publication of this book, giving Kick some good proof of his research.

However, quoting Dr. Mercola, the anti-vaccine proponent for a piece about how sunscreen causes cancer made me raise an eyebrow. Having researched Mercola and written an article about him, I don't find him as a dependable source. I do find him as an opportunist though, and it was disappointing to see Kick give him ink. It did have the silver lining of shaking me out of the mental complacency I mentioned earlier - believing something just because it's "authoritative" and contrary.

There's interesting information here and a lot if not most is true and accurate (and depressing) but I don't have faith that it's all true, so read with open eyes. ( )
  Sean191 | Jul 8, 2019 |
Years ago I was in Circus of Books on Sunset, probably on my way to a concert, and I happened across this book (or one of the two books its made up of) and I was totally interested. But I was poor, and didn't buy it. More recently, my fiance gave me this, and I love it. ( )
  AmberTheHuman | Aug 30, 2013 |
This is the kind of stuff that I love reading about, but then I get nightmares once I close my eyes...it's informative, but depressing. I made the mistake of reading its larger brother (_Everything You Know Is Wrong_) almost cover to cover on a weekend trip to Seattle...VERY depressing stuff, I tells ye! But good, if you can handle it :) ( )
  BinkaBonkaChair | Jun 18, 2012 |
I didn't find many of these 100 things to be overly surprising, though some were certainly interesting. I get the sense that the author wants us to get up in arms over some of the things our government is doing and hiding from us, but most of his facts come from mainstream media reports, so the events are not exactly hidden. It's more that the American public just doesn't care. And there wasn't anything in this book that made me want to jump up and protest, either, although maybe some of them should have. Guess we're all just too comfortable and jaded. It was a fun read and provided me with a few factoids to use in banter (for example, apparently 10% of the world's population was not fathered by the person they think is their dad). Basically just a bit of brain candy. ( )
  glade1 | Mar 26, 2011 |
Forced and awkward. Either unsurprising or uninteresting. Many points stretched way, way too far. Can find better hairbrained worries with a quick Google search. ( )
  Meerschaum | Aug 1, 2009 |
Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
Thanks to Anne, my parents, Ruthanne, Jennifer, Billy Dale, Brett & Cristy, Darrell, Terry & Rebekah, Mike, Matt, Gary, Richard, Alex, Rebecca, Disinfo, and others who've slipped my overstuffed mind at the moment.
First words
What turns a fact into something "you're not supposed to know"?
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

No library descriptions found.

Book description
From the jacket: Here's the big, not-so-secret secret. People in power--government and religious leaders, heads of big corporations, the rich and well connected--all have one major goal: to stay in power. And they'll do whatever it takes to make sure that happens. Sometimes this means suppressing the truth and covering up facts that might make the rest of us angry enough to challenge the powerful--or at least to have a good laugh at their expense.

That's why we need people like Russ Kick, dedicated to discovering and revealing all the juicy secrets that the vested interests have tried to bury.

Using careful research and impeccable sources, Kick uncovers the hidden truth. For example, while self-appointed censors warn constantly about the dangers of pornography, the fact is that pornography has existed since the first cave people carved dirty pictures into the walls--and civilization has managed to thrive all along.
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.41)
0.5
1
1.5 1
2 1
2.5
3 14
3.5
4 10
4.5
5 2

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 141,540,931 books! | Top bar: Always visible