HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

America's Boy: A Memoir by Wade Rouse
Loading...

America's Boy: A Memoir

by Wade Rouse

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
935204,486 (3.5)None
A journalist remembers his childhood struggles to gain acceptance from the jeans-wearing set, his envy of his admired older brother, his parent's atypical personalities, and the Fourth of July accident that ended his brother's life.

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Showing 5 of 5
Great book! ( )
  ownedbycats | Sep 1, 2013 |
I've had my eye out for this since I read Rouse's other memoir. This one covers some of the same ground, but starts much earlier in his life. His voice rings true. His family is interesting and flawed. The tragic & untimely death of Rouse's brother is a crucible for all the surviving family members. Worth a read, if memoirs are your thing. ( )
  satyridae | Apr 5, 2013 |
This book was more sad than I had expected. Wade is so funny in his other books. But it was a nice reminder that no one's life is all laughs that we all struggle. Wade's ability to overcome numerous challenges and sadnesses and maintain his sense of humor and to recognize what is important in life was very encouraging. ( )
  knitwit2 | Mar 10, 2013 |
This is probably one of the best memoirs I've read in a long time. The author describes what he went through growing up as an overweight, gay boy in small-town America during the 60's & 70's. Even after moving away and losing all the weight, he still struggled with who he was and how others perceived him. A very honest and heartfelt story. ( )
1 vote MTGirlAtHeart | Aug 21, 2009 |
Wade Rouse's slightly better than average memoir elucidates snippets from his life growing up fat and gay in the Missouri Ozarks. He lives in an exceedingly rural community with an overwhelmingly close but loving family and therefore spends most of his life pretending he is not gay (although, as he states several times, it's quite all right to be fat). Most of the stories are humorous, such as when Wade dresses up in his mother's bikini and crowns himself "Miss Sugar Creek," and others are heartbreaking, like the entire section regarding Wade's brother's death.
Rouse is an engaging and descriptive writer, and I enjoyed reading about his life. I was going to give this book a completely average review, but the final section of stories, about Wade finally coming to terms with his sexuality, completely redeem the rest of the exceedingly mediocre book. ( )
  EmScape | Jun 11, 2009 |
Showing 5 of 5
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.5)
0.5
1
1.5
2 3
2.5
3 9
3.5 1
4 5
4.5 2
5 3

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 142,625,123 books! | Top bar: Always visible