HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Summa Theologiae by Thomas Aquinas
Loading...
MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
845415,935 (4.15)25
  1. 00
    The range of reason by Jacques Maritain (gmknowles)
  2. 00
    Sheer Joy by Matthew Fox (TedWitham)
    TedWitham: Most of us read only excerpts from the Summa Theologica, and gain the impression that Aquinas was primarily an abstract philosopher applying Aristotlean ideas to Christianity. While this has some truth, Matthew Fox's overview shows Aquinas' strength as a Biblical scholar.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 25 mentions

Showing 4 of 4
The Summa Theologica (Latin: "Summary of Theology" or "Highest Theology") is the most famous work of Thomas Aquinas (1225–1274). It was intended as a manual for beginners as a compilation of all of the main theological teachings of the time. It summarizes the reasoning of all points of Christian theology, which before the Protestant Reformation subsisted solely in the Roman Catholic Church. The Summa's topics follow a cycle: the existence of God; God's creation, Man; Man's purpose; Christ; the Sacraments; and back to God. It is famous for its five arguments for the existence of God, the Quinquae viae (Latin: five ways). Throughout his work, Aquinas cites Augustine of Hippo, Aristotle, and other Christian, Jewish, Muslim and ancient pagan scholars.

This is an electronic edition of the complete book and includes an author biography. This book features a table of contents linked to every chapter.
  tony_sturges | Jun 22, 2017 |
This is perhaps the best edition of Saint Thomas Aquinas's famous magnum opus. I was given this set as a very expensive, very generous gift from a friend, and I could not believe how exquisite it was. The original Latin is a nice touch, it offers a more intimate study simply by being present, even if one cannot understand the text. I truly love my eight-volume Summa Theologiæ, and it is the most prized book in my collection. ( )
  charlescf | Aug 8, 2015 |
Yes, I have indeed read almost the whole thing. That's what happens when you're raised in an isolated religious environment and you try to be a thinker. ( )
1 vote Hanuman2 | Dec 16, 2007 |
This giant work is worthy of the Great Ideas. However, if there's one entry for which a well-chosen sampling is sufficient, this is it. Aquinas lived in the middle part of the 1200's. He was born to better-than-average means and was often offered high places within the church. He declined the latter in order to teach. He was a defender of the Dominican sect, bringing a new rigor to the form of religious "science" and also great reputation for himself. He brings the dialectic format of Socrates and the precision of Aristotle to the ongoing refinement of religious doctrine. Within that context, his ideas and style were novel and for this he did indeed offer a new, great idea. He falls short, however, of offering the type of religious truth one might hope for. His premise begins with the Bible, existing Catholic doctrine, and a number of philosophers, those other than Aristotle primarily religious. He quotes the vulgate and Aristotle most frequently. With this base of "facts," it is hard for his great format to proceed to build anything other than a solid castle built on that which might not be. The new leap he made was the setting of a hypothesis, along with supporting evidence, followed by rejection based more evidence. He also argues a lot of points that, while surely important at the time, strike me as something I could just as well wait to find out (Whether God is the Same as His Essense, Whether the Human Soul Was Produced Before the Body, Whether the Body of Man was Given a Fitting Disposition, How Angels Move). I'm sure the church felt differently, having a strong scholarly drive and a need to be able to project a doctrine consistent within itself. ( )
1 vote jpsnow |
Showing 4 of 4
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Article 1. Whether, besides philosophy, any further doctrine is required?

Objection 1. It seems that, besides philosophical science, we have no need of any further knowledge. For man should not seek to know what is above reason: "Seek not the things that are too high for thee" (Sirach 3:22). But whatever is not above reason is fully treated of in philosophical science. Therefore any other knowledge besides philosophical science is superfluous.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0870610635, Hardcover)

The Summa Theologica, St. Thomas Aquinas' brilliant synthesis of Christian thought, has had a decisive and permanent impact on philosophy and religion since the thirteenth century. As the title indicates, is a summing up of all that can be known about God and humanity's relations with God. Divided into three parts, the work consists of 38 tracts, 631 questions, about 3000 articles, 10,000 objections and their answers. This complete edition of the work, published in five volumes, was translated into English by the Fathers of the Dominican Province and first appeared in 1911. A revised edition was published in London in 1920, and in America in 1947. The Christian Classics edition is a reproduction of the 1947 Benziger Brothers edition.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:16:21 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

The Summa Theologica (Latin: "Summary of Theology" or "Highest Theology") is the most famous work of Thomas Aquinas (12251274). It was intended as a manual for beginners as a compilation of all of the main theological teachings of the time. It summarizes the reasoning of all points of Christian theology, which before the Protestant Reformation subsisted solely in the Roman Catholic Church. The Summa's topics follow a cycle: the existence of God; God's creation, Man; Man's purpose; Christ; the Sacraments; and back to God. It is famous for its five arguments for the existence of God, the Quinquae viae (Latin: five ways). Throughout his work, Aquinas cites Augustine of Hippo, Aristotle, and other Christian, Jewish, Muslim and ancient pagan scholars.… (more)

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.15)
0.5
1 3
1.5
2 2
2.5
3 4
3.5 2
4 17
4.5
5 26

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 134,114,635 books! | Top bar: Always visible