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The Canary Trainer by Nicholas Meyer
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The Canary Trainer (1993)

by Nicholas Meyer

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Nicholas Meyer's Sherlock Holmes (3)

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» See also 5 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 10 (next | show all)
Didn't like the way Erik was portrayed. I understand this was more a Sherlock story, but with that portrayal and the changing of a few other characters from POTO, I just can't get into it. Also with a small jab at the end of Leroux's work.............its on my "Trade Only" list as opposed to the "Buy" list.

It was an OK read, much more Sherlock and Watson, their portrayal was spot on. Plenty of great atmosphere and gothic/Victorian/Paris feel.

Great for Sherlock fans not so much for Phantom fans. For both like me, not so good.

Much prefer Angel Of The Opera. ( )
  LGandT | Feb 1, 2018 |
Didn't like the way Erik was portrayed. I understand this was more a Sherlock story, but with that portrayal and the changing of a few other characters from POTO, I just can't get into it. Also with a small jab at the end of Leroux's work.............its on my "Trade Only" list as opposed to the "Buy" list.

It was an OK read, much more Sherlock and Watson, their portrayal was spot on. Plenty of great atmosphere and gothic/Victorian/Paris feel.

Great for Sherlock fans not so much for Phantom fans. For both like me, not so good. ( )
  LGandT | Jan 25, 2018 |
The thidr in the Meyer series of pseudo-Holmes books irritates me by taking the real Watsonian reference to a "canary trainer" to be a trainer of opera singers and making Holmes' opponent a version of the Phantom of the Opera. Naturally in an opera setting Holmes meets again his favorite opera singer, Irene Aidler. ( )
  antiquary | Oct 16, 2016 |
My first experience with Nicholas Meyer's take on Sherlock Holmes when I saw The Seven-per-Cent Solution on cable at my grandmother's. Later I came into possession of the book and its sequel, The West End Horror. But I didn't have the final one, The Canary Trainer so I put it on my wishlist.

When it was time to pick up The Canary Trainer at the library, I had some time while I waited for my kids to finish what they were doing. So I sat on one of the comfy couches in the children's wing and I started to read. By the second page I was struck with how similar the book was to the opening of The Beekeeper's Apprentice by Laurie R. King.

Sherlock Holmes is in the public domain now. After re-reading The Beekeeper's Apprentice I realized that they had to be pulling from an Arthur Conan Doyle book I hadn't read. So I did some poking around and realized I'd missed two: The Return of Sherlock Holmes and His Last Bow. They are often published together and I have them now on my to be read pile.

So that takes me back to The Canary Trainer. It begins with Sherlock keeping bees. But he is pulled back into his profession, this time not by a fourteen year bookworm but by his old friend Watson.

The game a foot relates to Holmes's time when was away (namely between the time that Doyle killed him off and was forced by angry fans to resurrect him). The tale he tells shares points of similarity again with King's vision of things as related in The Language of Bees. This time, though, Meyer takes the story and weaves it into another contemporaneous story, The Phantom of the Opera.

Being a fan of The Phantom of the Opera (the book and the original film, not the stage play nor more recent film), I had fun imagining Holmes in the middle of it all. He was trying to get away from being a detective, being there instead to play violin. Mysteries though always have a way of finding a detective, especially those who don't want to be found! ( )
  pussreboots | Aug 5, 2013 |
Original post - In French - on my blog: http://moncoinlecture.over-blog.com/article-sherlock-holmes-et-le-fantome-de-l-o...

I love Sherlock Holmes. And I love the Phantom. I couldn't resist to a book that is about both. I think Nicholas Meyer has written a few Sherlock Holmes pastiches (but I haven't read them except) and this one is set in Paris during the lost years of Sherlock Holmes.

It was a fun read but not a great one. Sherlock is entangled in the mystery of the Phantom of the opera and the great detective himself narrates the story to Watson, which can account for the differences in style and perception. My problem with this novel is that - obviously - Meyer had to change elements from the Phantom's plot. And since I know quite well - ok, very well - it kind of disturbed me. I think I would have liked it better if it had been very, very different.

A nice read. I'm curious to read the other pastiches, though... ( )
  Moncoinlecture | Apr 4, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 10 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Meyer, Nicholasprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Beth Tondreau DesignDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kass, FrancineCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Werner, HoniCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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"It is certainly a most mysterious business, Watson. What do you make of it?"
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Book description
Meyer's third novel based on Sherlock Holmes finds the celebrated sleuth entangled in mysterious events involving the Phantom of the Opera.
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Located by a computer in the bowels of a major university where it had collected dust for over half a century, this missing manuscript by the biographer of Sherlock Holmes reveals for the first time a hitherto unknown episode in the life of the Great Detective. Holmes, master sleuth, was also an accomplished violinist. Following his discharge from therapy with Sigmund Freud (see The Seven-Per-Cent Solution), we now learn that he journeyed to Paris and there found employment as a pit musician at the Paris Opera. The year is 1891, Paris is the capital of the western world, and its opera house is full of surprises. First and by no means least is the sudden reappearance of the great love of Holmes's life, an accomplished singer from Hoboken, New Jersey. Second is the series of seemingly bizarre accidents--each more sinister than the last--allegedly arranged by the "Opera Ghost, " an opponent who goes by many names and is more than equal to Holmes. Alone in a strange and spectacular city, with none of his normal resources, Holmes is commissioned to protect a vulnerable young soprano, whose beautiful voice obsesses a creature no one believes is real, but whose jealousy is lethal. In this dazzling, long-awaited sequel to The Seven-Per-Cent Solution, the detective pits wits against a musical maniac, and we are treated to an adventure unlike any other in the archives of Sherlock Holmes.… (more)

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