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The Pragmatic Programmer: From Journeyman to Master (2000)

by Andrew Hunt

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2,591284,671 (4.32)8
Written as a series of self-contained sections and filled with entertaining anecdotes, thoughtful examples, and interesting analogies, The Pragmatic Programmer illustrates the best practices and major pitfalls of many different aspects of software development. Whether you're a new coder, an experienced programmer, or a manager responsible for software projects, use these lessons daily, and you'll quickly see improvements in personal productivity, accuracy, and job satisfaction. You'll learn skills and develop habits and attitudes that form the foundation for long-term success in your career. You'll become a Pragmatic Programmer.… (more)
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» See also 8 mentions

English (24)  Hungarian (2)  German (2)  Italian (1)  All languages (29)
Showing 1-5 of 24 (next | show all)
The Pragmatic Programmer is still quote current despite the fact that it was published in 1999. The book contains all sorts of useful advice for programmers. Most people, especially those with a *nix background, have probably heard a lot of what they have to say. However, this book emphasizes a lot of good software engineering techniques, describes why the techniques are important, and manages to do this in a readable package.
  eri_kars | Jul 10, 2022 |
A very good generalist book full of ideas meant to make your work more robust, easier, and cleaner. Very pragmatic, indeed. If anyone needs the summary (either to find out new information or, if you've read it already, review the ideas), just let me know. ( )
  luciarux | Jul 3, 2022 |
I am still reading the book. It is a nice book. Till now I can just sum it up in one phrase - Awesome non-technical book addressed to technical people. ( )
  palakmathur | Feb 11, 2022 |
As an experienced dev I agreed with most of the book (or rather the first third, at which point I stopped reading). However, it felt like there was very little actionable information for me and I'm not sure younger me would have known how to apply the recommendations. ( )
  damnnicks | Jul 31, 2021 |
Here's a book for coders without much code, and still valid after nearly 20 years and several generations of software. It's a catalog of productivity practices, not only in coding but also in setting agendas, learning new methods, writing use cases and requirements, making estimates, fixing rather than doing workarounds, automating, documenting and other common project elements. Maybe it's not just for coders after all.
  rynk | Jul 11, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 24 (next | show all)
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For Ellie and Juliet,
Elizabeth and Zachary,
Stuart and Henry
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This book will help you become a better programmer.
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First, we want to make our systems highly configurable. Not just things such as screen colors and prompt text, but deeply ingrained items such as the choice of algorithms, database products, middleware technology, and user-interface style.
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Written as a series of self-contained sections and filled with entertaining anecdotes, thoughtful examples, and interesting analogies, The Pragmatic Programmer illustrates the best practices and major pitfalls of many different aspects of software development. Whether you're a new coder, an experienced programmer, or a manager responsible for software projects, use these lessons daily, and you'll quickly see improvements in personal productivity, accuracy, and job satisfaction. You'll learn skills and develop habits and attitudes that form the foundation for long-term success in your career. You'll become a Pragmatic Programmer.

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Book description
Contents

Foreword xii

Preface xvii

1 A Pragmatic Philosophy 1

1. The Cat Ate My Source Code 2

2. Software Entropy 4

3. Stone Soup and Boiled Frogs

4. Good-Enough Software 9

5. Your Knowledge Portfolio 12

6. Communicate! 18

2 A Pragmatic Approach 25

7. The Evils of Duplication 26

8. Orthogonality 34

9. Reversibility 44

10. Tracer Bullets 48

11. Prototypes and Post-it Notes 53

12. Domain Languages 57

13. Estimating 64

3 The Basic Tools 71

14. The Power of Plain Text 73

15. Shell Games 77

16. Power Editing 82

17. Source Code Control 86

18. Debugging 90

19. Text Manipulation 99

20. Code Generators 102

4 Pragmatic Paranoia 107

21. Design by Contract 109

22. Dead Programs Tell No Lies 120

23. Assertive Programming 122

24. When to Use Exceptions 125

25. How to Balance Resources 129

5 Bend, or Break 137

26. Decoupling and the Law of Demeter 138

27. Metaprogramming 144

28. Temporal Coupling 150

29. It's Just a View 157

30. Blackboards 165

6 While You Are Coding 171

31. Programming by Coincidence 172

32. Algorithm Speed 177

33. Refactoring 184

34. Code That's Easy to Test 189

35. Evil Wizards 198

7 Before the Project 201

36. The Requirements Pit 202

37. Solving Impossible Puzzles 212

38. Not Until You're Ready 215

39. The Specification Trap 217

40. Circles and Arrows 220

8 Pragmatic Projects 223

41. Pragmatic Teams 224

42. Ubiquitous Automation 230

43. Ruthless Testing 237

44. It's All Writing 248

45. Great Expectations 255

46. Pride and Prejudice 258

Appendices

A Resources 261

Professional Societies 262

Building a Library 262

Internet Resources 266

Bibliography 275

B Answers to Exercises 279

Index 309
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

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Penguin Australia

An edition of this book was published by Penguin Australia.

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