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What Hath God Wrought: The Transformation of…
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What Hath God Wrought: The Transformation of America, 1815-1848 (2007)

by Daniel Walker Howe

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» See also 54 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 20 (next | show all)
Another solid entry in the Oxford History of the United States series. I didn't know a lot about the antebellum period and this 900 page tome was very enlightening and never dull. From politics to technology and social and religious movements there was a lot going on in this 33 year period which had a momentous effect on later events. I learned how Martin Van Buren invented the political party and how really horrid a human being Andrew Jackson was (and how he reminds me in a lot of ways of Trump). ( )
  jjwilson61 | Mar 1, 2017 |
Interesting social and political coverage of the time between the end of the War of 1812 and the 1848 end of the Mexican War. Interesting in that it focuses on social events not always included in these type of histories, such as the role and conditions of women, slaves, and religions, not just the political sphere. ( )
1 vote cyclops1771 | Nov 10, 2014 |
A thorough and insightful review of period of American history that is usually overlooked. ( )
  Doondeck | Jul 3, 2013 |
I'm listening to this on Audible. It comes in four parts and I'm in part 4 now; I no longer understand why the Democratic Party keeps celebrating Jefferson-Jackson Day -- especially Jackson. (And although the Whigs are said to be the forerunners of the Republican Party, most of the current Republicans would not feel they had much in common with John Quincy Adams or the young Abe Lincoln.)

This book is part of the Oxford History of the United States series. I decided I should read/listen to it before tackling [b:Battle Cry of Freedom|35100|Battle Cry of Freedom The Civil War Era|James M. McPherson|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1168575255s/35100.jpg|35039] because my grasp on this period of American history was rather weak. Until recently, the only bad thing I could remember about Andrew Jackson was the Trail of Tears; now I fear I've lost all respect for him.

I enjoyed this book also because Howe brought in a lot of information about daily life, religious and social movements, and technological advances of the period. I would recommend it to anyone who feels a gap in his/her knowledge of this important era. The reading was well done, however, if there are illustrations in the book it would be worth taking a look at that format. ( )
  auntieknickers | Apr 3, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 20 (next | show all)
[An] exemplary addition to the Oxford History of the United States.
 
One of the chief merits of “What Hath God Wrought” is Howe’s earnest effort, and great success, at chronicling changes of all sorts, from rates of childhood mortality to the gross national product, from the frequency of bathing to the firepower of cannons.
 

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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Howe, Daniel Walkerprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Cullen, PatrickNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Perkins, RachelCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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To the Memory of John Quincy Adams
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On the twenty-fourth of May 1844, Professor F.B. Morse, seated amidst a hushed gathering of distinguished national leaders in the chambers of the United States Supreme Court in Washington, tapped out a message on a device of cogs and coiled wires: WHAT HAS GOD WROUGHT
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0195078942, Hardcover)

The Oxford History of the United States is by far the most respected multi-volume history of our nation. In this Pulitzer prize-winning, critically acclaimed addition to the series, historian Daniel Walker Howe illuminates the period from the battle of New Orleans to the end of the Mexican-American War, an era when the United States expanded to the Pacific and won control over the richest part of the North American continent.

A panoramic narrative, What Hath God Wrought portrays revolutionary improvements in transportation and communications that accelerated the extension of the American empire. Railroads, canals, newspapers, and the telegraph dramatically lowered travel times and spurred the spread of information. These innovations prompted the emergence of mass political parties and stimulated America's economic development from an overwhelmingly rural country to a diversified economy in which commerce and industry took their place alongside agriculture. In his story, the author weaves together political and military events with social, economic, and cultural history. Howe examines the rise of Andrew Jackson and his Democratic party, but contends that John Quincy Adams and other Whigs--advocates of public education and economic integration, defenders of the rights of Indians, women, and African-Americans--were the true prophets of America's future. In addition, Howe reveals the power of religion to shape many aspects of American life during this period, including slavery and antislavery, women's rights and other reform movements, politics, education, and literature. Howe's story of American expansion culminates in the bitterly controversial but brilliantly executed war waged against Mexico to gain California and Texas for the United States.

Winner of the New-York Historical Society American History Book Prize

Finalist, 2007 National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction

The Oxford History of the United States
The Oxford History of the United States is the most respected multi-volume history of our nation. The series includes three Pulitzer Prize winners, a New York Times bestseller, and winners of the Bancroft and Parkman Prizes. The Atlantic Monthly has praised it as "the most distinguished series in American historical scholarship," a series that "synthesizes a generation's worth of historical inquiry and knowledge into one literally state-of-the-art book." Conceived under the general editorship of C. Vann Woodward and Richard Hofstadter, and now under the editorship of David M. Kennedy, this renowned series blends social, political, economic, cultural, diplomatic, and military history into coherent and vividly written narrative.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:07:05 -0400)

Publisher's description: The newest volume in the renowned Oxford History of the United States-- A brilliant portrait of an era that saw dramatic transformations in American life. The Oxford History of the United States is by far the most respected multi-volume history of our nation. The series includes two Pulitzer Prize winners, two New York Times bestsellers, and winners of the Bancroft and Parkman Prizes. Now, in What Hath God Wrought, historian Daniel Walker Howe illuminates the period from the battle of New Orleans to the end of the Mexican-American War, an era when the United States expanded to the Pacific and won control over the richest part of the North American continent. Howe's panoramic narrative portrays revolutionary improvements in transportation and communications that accelerated the extension of the American empire. Railroads, canals, newspapers, and the telegraph dramatically lowered travel times and spurred the spread of information. These innovations prompted the emergence of mass political parties and stimulated America's economic development from an overwhelmingly rural country to a diversified economy in which commerce and industry took their place alongside agriculture. In his story, the author weaves together political and military events with social, economic, and cultural history. He examines the rise of Andrew Jackson and his Democratic party, but contends that John Quincy Adams and other Whigs--advocates of public education and economic integration, defenders of the rights of Indians, women, and African-Americans--were the true prophets of America's future. He reveals the power of religion to shape many aspects of American life during this period, including slavery and antislavery, women's rights and other reform movements, politics, education, and literature. Howe's story of American expansion culminates in the bitterly controversial but brilliantly executed war waged against Mexico to gain California and Texas for the United States. By 1848 America had been transformed. What Hath God Wrought provides a monumental narrative of this formative period in United States history.… (more)

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