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The Works of Rudyard Kipling (1995)

by Rudyard Kipling

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563332,659 (4.15)7
Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: THE STORY OF URIAH Now there were two men in one city; the one rich, and the other poor. Jack Barrett went to Quetta Because they told him to. He left his wife at Simla On three-fourths his monthly screw. Jack Barrett died at Quetta Ere the next month's pay he drew. Jack Barrett went to Quetta, He didn't understand The reason of his transfer From the pleasant mountain-land: The season was September, And it killed him out of hand. Jack Barrett went to Quetta And there gave up the ghost: Attempting two men's duty In that very healthy post; And Mrs. Barrett mourned for him Five lively months at most. Jack Barrett's bones at Quetta Enjoy profound repose; But I shouldn't be astonished If now his spirit knows The reason of his transfer From the Himalayan snows. And, when the Last Great Bugle Call Adown the Hurnai throbs, When the last grim joke is entered In the big black Book of Jobs, And Quetta graveyards give again Their victims to the air, I shouldn't like to be the man, Who sent Jack Barrett there. THE POST THAT FITTED Though tangled and twisted the course of true love, This ditty explains No tangle's so tangled it cannot improve If the Lover has brains. Ere the steamer bore him Eastward, Sleary was engaged to marry An attractive girl at Tunbridge, whom he called my little Carrie. Sleary's pay was very modest; Sleary was the other way. Who can cook a two-plate dinner on eight paltry dibs a day? Long he pondered o'er the question in his scantly furnished quarters ? Then proposed to Minnie Boffkin, eldest of Judge Boffkin's daughters. Certainly an impecunious Subaltern was not a catch, But the Boffkins knew that Minnie mightn't make another match. So they recogn...… (more)
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    The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman (Anonymous user)
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» See also 7 mentions

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Somebody down below this entry (didn't leave a name, and that's good) said (he or she?) can't bear to read Kipling's poetry because he sometimes lapses into what we might call "baby talk". I say that's perfectly true. Kipling does indeed burble and coo when addressing the very young. So I'm 70 years old, a man grown, a former sergeant of Marines, and I burble and coo when I talk to my loving cat, Sam (who probably is smarter than most human infants).

But I wonder if the anonymous writer has read the Kipling lines that combat solders often quote:

"When you're wounded and left on Afghanistan's plains,
And the women come down to cut up what remains,
Just roll to your rifle and blow out your brains,
And go to your God like a soldier."

That sure doesn't sound like sissy stuff or baby talk to me. What it tells me is that Kipling had been there. Kipling saw it all and felt what he saw. He was a tough old buzzard.

Some folks don't like Kipling. As for me, I love everything I've read by Kipling thus far, and I wish Rikki Tikki Tavi would come and sleep with me and my cat Sam in our bed. Kipling wrote some of the most astounding fiction I've ever read. Those who don't like Kipling should try George MacDonald Fraser. If you think Kipling was a liar, try Flashman's account of the Sepoy Mutiny, the Rani of Jhansi or of the battle at Cawnpore Well. WOW!

If you think George MacDonald Fraser was a liar, you should know he crawled through the jungle on his belly and fought the Japanese banzai boys from one end of Burma to the other. Every once in a while, though, he liked to stop, build a fire, and "brew up". He died a couple of years ago and the world is a lesser place for that. Most of what he wrote is outrageously funny even for being some of the grittiest stuff I've ever read.

Fraser is (was) a rare talent. So was Mr. Kipling. ( )
  NathanielPoe | Feb 19, 2019 |
A compilation of Kipling's stories, novels, and verse. Shows him at his best.
  Fledgist | Dec 27, 2009 |
I'm sure it's very petty of me and that I'm missing the point as usual, but I can hardly ever get past the rum-titty-tum rhythms of Kipling's verse. That combined with the tiresome cockneyisms makes everything sounds like a music hall song. And while I like a good old knees up as much as anyone, I don't particularly want to sit down and read the lyrics to "Boiled Beef and Carrots". ( )
  stilton | Dec 24, 2006 |
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Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: THE STORY OF URIAH Now there were two men in one city; the one rich, and the other poor. Jack Barrett went to Quetta Because they told him to. He left his wife at Simla On three-fourths his monthly screw. Jack Barrett died at Quetta Ere the next month's pay he drew. Jack Barrett went to Quetta, He didn't understand The reason of his transfer From the pleasant mountain-land: The season was September, And it killed him out of hand. Jack Barrett went to Quetta And there gave up the ghost: Attempting two men's duty In that very healthy post; And Mrs. Barrett mourned for him Five lively months at most. Jack Barrett's bones at Quetta Enjoy profound repose; But I shouldn't be astonished If now his spirit knows The reason of his transfer From the Himalayan snows. And, when the Last Great Bugle Call Adown the Hurnai throbs, When the last grim joke is entered In the big black Book of Jobs, And Quetta graveyards give again Their victims to the air, I shouldn't like to be the man, Who sent Jack Barrett there. THE POST THAT FITTED Though tangled and twisted the course of true love, This ditty explains No tangle's so tangled it cannot improve If the Lover has brains. Ere the steamer bore him Eastward, Sleary was engaged to marry An attractive girl at Tunbridge, whom he called my little Carrie. Sleary's pay was very modest; Sleary was the other way. Who can cook a two-plate dinner on eight paltry dibs a day? Long he pondered o'er the question in his scantly furnished quarters ? Then proposed to Minnie Boffkin, eldest of Judge Boffkin's daughters. Certainly an impecunious Subaltern was not a catch, But the Boffkins knew that Minnie mightn't make another match. So they recogn...

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Book description
Contains:
Introduction by Gail Harvey
"If"
"The Ballad of East and West"
"L'Envoi"
"Evarra and His Gods"
"The Last of the Light Brigade"
"Gunga Din"
"Tommy"
"Danny Deever"
"The Widow at Windsor"
"Mandalay"
"Tomlinson"
"The Long Trail"
"When Earth's Last Picture is Painted"
"The Last Chantey"
"To the True Romance"
"The Three-Decker"
"The Miracles"
"The Day"
"The Vampire"
"The Recessional"
"The Explorer"
"Dirge of Dead Sisters"
"The Broken Men"
"The Settler"
"Chant-Pagan"
"The Second Voyage"
"Piet"
"Ford o'Kabul River"
"The Files (the Subeditor Speaks)"
"The Gipsy Trail"
"The Veterans"
"'Mary, Pity Women!'"
"A Charm"
"'For All We Have and Are'"
"My Boy Jack"
"The Holy War"
"Mesopotamia"
"The Benefators"
"Epitaths of the War"
Haiku summary

Legacy Library: Rudyard Kipling

Rudyard Kipling has a Legacy Library. Legacy libraries are the personal libraries of famous readers, entered by LibraryThing members from the Legacy Libraries group.

See Rudyard Kipling's legacy profile.

See Rudyard Kipling's author page.

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