HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

The Blessing Way (1970)

by Tony Hillerman

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Leaphorn/Chee (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,025606,909 (3.74)217
Homicide is always an abomination, but there is something exceptionally disturbing about the victim discovered in a high lonely place, a corpse with a mouth full of sand, abandoned at a crime scene seemingly devoid of tracks or useful clues. Though it goes against his better judgment, Navajo Tribal Police Lieutenant Joe Leaphorn cannot help but suspect the hand of a supernatural killer. There is palpable evil in the air, and Leaphorn's pursuit of a Wolf-Witch is leading him where even the bravest men fear, on a chilling trail that winds perilously between mysticism and murder.… (more)
  1. 10
    The Shaman Sings by James D. Doss (ckNikka)
    ckNikka: Great mix of story telling - humor - culture and places
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 217 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 59 (next | show all)
I almost quit reading this after the first bit, because it was a lot of Indian folklore and superstition, which isn't really something I enjoy much of. I just wasn't really following it. There was one Indian called Horseman, another was The Wolf, and then there were the Wind People, etc.

So, I went back and reread/skimmed over the part I'd read in a written version instead of audio, and figured out what was happening; it was more than just stories about strange beliefs, chants and ghosts, although they were important to the story. The real story was that someone was killed, and there were strange things about the killing. The Horseman was actually simply the guy's last name, and he was a petty criminal on the run. The Wolf was some dude with a wolf skin over his head, which had meaning to The People (as the Navajo call themselves). The Wind People were just thrown in for color.

There were two main characters - one was Lt. Joe Leaphorn, from Navajo Law and Order, as they call the police there, and the other was Professor Bergen McKee, a white professor specializing in Indian folklore and primitive superstition in Alburquerque. He had previous contact with Leaphorn about his classes, and they were friends somewhat. He was waiting for an opportune time to go back for more information.

In this first book of the series, McKee was featured somewhat more than Leaphorn, although Leaphorn was shown to be a very capable investigator, and figured out most of what was going on.

After getting over the initial hump, I began to like this book a lot. It was exciting, plus it was educational about the Navajo ways. I look forward to reading more of this series. ( )
  MartyFried | Oct 9, 2022 |
These are like comfort food for me -- a mystery series that my Dad loves and shared with me years ago. I do appreciate the intricacy of Hillerman's presentation of Navajo culture, and his respectful writing. ( )
  jennybeast | Apr 14, 2022 |
This mystery introduces Joe Leaphorn, a police officer on a Navaho reservation in the Southwest. He is a Navaho who is also college educated and who served in the military with duty in Korea. His case this time deals with the death of Luis Horseman who was wanted for questioning after a knife fight. When his body was found 100 miles from where Joe expected him to be and his cause of death was unusual, Joe begins to visit people and ask questions.

Meanwhile, Joe's friend anthropologist Bergen McKee is summering on the reservation looking for information about Wolf-Witches for a paper he is planning to write. McKee is traveling with archaeologist J. R. Canfield who is exploring Anasazi ruins. McKee is also talking to people about rumors of witchcraft.

Joe's investigation and McKee's overlap since opinion on the reservation is that Horseman's death was caused by a witch. And both investigations find them encountering an unexpected villain with murderous intentions.

The mystery was interesting and well-plotted and took some unexpected turns. I enjoyed becoming immersed in Navaho culture and beliefs as I read this story. I liked the way Leaphorn fit into his environment and altered his investigative style to fit with the culture. Leaphorn was an interesting character that I would like to know more about. Luckily, this is the first of a long series. ( )
  kmartin802 | Feb 5, 2022 |
Interesting with lots of local color and Navajo background. Surprised at how little Leaphorn appeared in the story. ( )
  majkia | Jan 15, 2022 |
The Blessing Way is an odd story. It is difficult to follow. The title doesn't seem to match the story which deals with Navajo beliefs in witches and people taking advantage of their beliefs. There are murders, researchers, and a group looking for easy money. Because of the ambiguity of the story only three stars were awarded here. Not one of Mr. Hillerman's better stories. ( )
  lbswiener | Jan 13, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 59 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (4 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Tony Hillermanprimary authorall editionscalculated
Guidall, GeorgeNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Luis Horseman leaned the flat stone very carefully against the pinon twig, adjusted its balance exactly and then cautiously withdrew his hand.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Homicide is always an abomination, but there is something exceptionally disturbing about the victim discovered in a high lonely place, a corpse with a mouth full of sand, abandoned at a crime scene seemingly devoid of tracks or useful clues. Though it goes against his better judgment, Navajo Tribal Police Lieutenant Joe Leaphorn cannot help but suspect the hand of a supernatural killer. There is palpable evil in the air, and Leaphorn's pursuit of a Wolf-Witch is leading him where even the bravest men fear, on a chilling trail that winds perilously between mysticism and murder.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.74)
0.5
1 5
1.5 2
2 16
2.5 8
3 145
3.5 46
4 192
4.5 9
5 94

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 180,134,259 books! | Top bar: Always visible