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Earth Logic by Laurie J. Marks
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Earth Logic

by Laurie J. Marks

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Elemental Logic (book 2)

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Showing 4 of 4
The Elemental Logic series is shaping up to be one of those book series where I’m a fan of the characters and the world but not at all of the plot.

Earth Logic is the second in the Elemental Logic series, a fantasy series set in a world without sexism or heteronormativity. If you’re unfamiliar with the series, you should probably start with the first book, Fire Logic.

This is usually the point in the review where I give a basic plot synopsis. However, I’m not really sure what the plot of Earth Logic is? Karis is the G’deon, and it’s her responsibility to rule and care for the nation of Shaftal, which is currently invaded by foreigners, the Sainnites. The occupation needs to be ended, but the entire plan for this revolves around vague prophecies which make no sense to me. Have I mentioned how much I hate fantasy books where the entire plot is based off prophecy?

Anyway, the prophecy says that if Shaftal is to be saved, Zanja must be dead. That’s literally all the information given, and the characters decide to act on this? I have no idea how the entire Zanja plot line is at all relevant to the book!

In reflection, it felt like not a lot happened in Earth Logic, especially when it comes to the chapters concerning the characters from Fire Logic. There’s some angsting over what to do about the Zanja prophecy. There’s lots of sitting around and talking. There’s lots of Karis doing nothing. Is it any surprise that my favorite character in this book was one of the new POV characters, Clement, who seemed like the only person in the book actually doing things?

Clement is a high placed officer of the Sainnites who was brought to the country of Shaftal by her adoptive soldier mother when she was a child. She also is one of the few people who know just how bad thing are looking for the Sainnites. Basically, demographics are not in their favor. Since all of the Sainnites are soldiers, they have very few children. And what children they do manage to raise up inevitably become new soldiers and tend to get killed in rather short order.

I still like the characters of this series. I still like that it’s set in a world where queer relationships are normal and no one raises an eye at women doing things or holding positions of authority. But while I really liked Fire Logic, I found Earth Logic disappointing. I don’t know if I’ll be continuing with this series.

Originally posted on The Illustrated Page. ( )
  pwaites | Nov 15, 2016 |
I actually liked this, the second book in the Elemental Logic trilogy, better than the first, which is a nice surprise. In Fire Logic, Marks introduced a country formerly known for its hospitality and philosophy that was invaded by warriors from across the ocean. Colonialism, culture appropriation, genocide and mixed-race children are all hugely important to the plot; the entire thing, in fact, is about culture clash. It is very much a fantasy series—most characters have magic of some kind—but an exceedingly thoughtful one.
The first book followed the rebels against Saiinite rule; this book follows a Saiinite leader, Lt.Gen. Clement. I really enjoyed seeing the characters through their foes' eyes, but even more I loved the Saiinite herself. ( )
  wealhtheowwylfing | Feb 29, 2016 |
There are so many things in this book! It is very thingful. And thingful books are my favorite. ( )
  JenneB | Apr 2, 2013 |
http://nwhyte.livejournal.com/1559494.html

I was recommended this fantasy novel, the second in a four-part series, some time ago as a fictional treatment of peace processes. Unfortunately it is the kind of immersive fantasy that doesn't really grab me, so I've given up after 130 pages. ( )
  nwhyte | Oct 30, 2010 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Laurie J. Marksprimary authorall editionscalculated
Bell, JulieCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jennings, KathleenCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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For the people of Melrose, Massachusetts--especially the baristas, poets, counselors, babies, delivery people, firemen, illegal parkers, students, parents, photographers, coffee drinkers, jaywalkers, and neighbors. And also for the people who love snow, plant flowers, hang Christmas lights, and refuse to put vinyl siding on their beautiful Victorian houses. And for their dogs and cats, and for the crabby snapping turtle I rescued from the middle of the road one afternoon, and for the flocks of geese that fly by overhead.
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One day, Raven was bored.
Quotations
What has always distinguished the Shaftali people is their hospitality. The great historians have written of it repeatedly: of the effort the Shaftali people go through, to treat every stranger as a member of the family. They say, perhaps rightly, that this tradition has an element of self-interest, for to feed and shelter the homeless wanderer prevents crime and theft. But in fact this custom goes much deeper than self-interest.

The Land of Shaftal is unforgiving, a place of harsh winters and brief summers, where sometimes only luck might decide the difference between death and survival. That once was the case, long ago, in the time of the first G'deon, Mackapee. But as Mackapee sat in his isolated cave by a peat fire, watching over his sheep, he imagined Shaftal as a community based on mercy. Kindness and generosity, he wrote, can never be earned and will never be deserved. Hospitality is not an act of justice, but of mercy--a mercy beneficial to everyone, by making it possible to depend on and trust each other.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0765348381, Mass Market Paperback)

A sweeping drama of war, intrigue, magic, and love

With Earth Logic, Laurie J. Marks continues the epic of her stunningly imagined world of Shaftal, which she first introduced in Fire Logic.

Shaftal has a ruler again, a woman with enough power to heal the war-torn land and expel the invading Sainnites from Shaftal. Or it would have a ruler if the earth witch Karis G'deon consented to rule. Instead, she lives in obscurity with the fractious family of elemental talents who gathered around her in Fire Logic. She is waiting for some sign, but no one, least of all Karis herself, knows what it is.

Then the Sainnite garrison at Watford is attacked by a troop of zealots claiming to speak for the Lost G'deon, and a mysterious and deadly plague attacks the land, killing both Sainnites and Shaftali. Karis must act or watch her beloved country fall into famine and chaos. And when Karis acts, the very stones of the earth sit up and take notice.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:08:14 -0400)

"Shaftal has a ruler again, a woman with enough power to heal the war-torn land and expel the invading Sainnites from Shaftal. Or it would have a ruler if the earth witch Karis G'deon consented to rule. Instead, she lives in obscurity with the fractious family of elemental talents who gathered around her in Fire Logic. She is waiting for some sign, but no one, least of all Karis herself, knows what it is." "Then the Sainnite garrison at Watfield is attacked by a troop of zealots claiming to speak for the Lost G'deon, and a mysterious and deadly plague attacks the land, killing both Sainnites and Shaftali. Karis must act or watch her beloved country fall into famine and chaos. And when Karis acts, the very stones of the earth sit up and take notice."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

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