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Gone for Soldiers (2000)

by Jeff Shaara

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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1,1111218,527 (3.93)13
Fiction. Literature. Thriller. Historical Fiction. HTML:In Gone for Soldiers, Jeff Shaara carries us back 15 years before the momentous conflict he has so brilliantly chronicled, to a time when the Civil War's most familiar names are fighting for another cause, junior officers marching under the same flag in an unfamiliar land, experiencing combat for the first time in the Mexican-American War.
In March 1847, 8,000 soldiers landed on the beaches of Vera Cruz, led by the army's commanding general, Winfield Scott-a heroic veteran of the War of 1812, short tempered, vain, and nostalgic for the glories of his youth. At his right hand is Robert E. Lee, a forty year-old engineer, a dignified, serious man who has never seen combat.
In vivid prose that illuminates the dark psychology of soldiers trapped behind enemy lines, Jeff Shaara brings to life the familiar characters, the stunning triumphs and soul-crushing defeats of this fascinating, long-forgotten war.
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Showing 1-5 of 12 (next | show all)
Another fine historical novel by Jeff Shaara, whom I always enjoy. And how many novels about the Mexican-American War are there?! Are there any?! (And remember The Alamo took place long before the War). Most of the chapters are about Winfield Scott (as should be) and Robert E Lee, then a youngish engineer. He became a member of Scott's staff and his chief scout, having a large influence on Scott. There are other characters, including several future Civil War leaders. The story is interesting and well-written, as all of Shaara's books are, as well as historically accurate. Very little is written about the Mexican-American War, and this makes you want to read up more on it. I'm sure most people today don't even know that there was a war between the U.S. and Mexico. This is one of Shaara's earlier books (from 2000), but I recommend finding a copy and enjoying it. And previous knowledge of the War is not necessary! ( )
  CRChapin | Jul 8, 2023 |
This book is good and I learned a lot about the Mexican War from it but I think his other books are better. Just in general though I don't think he reaches the level his dad did in Killer Angels. ( )
  mcsp | Jan 25, 2021 |
Such ANGST! Robert E. Lee was an engineer who graduated from West Point. Why does he sound like a 15-year-old girl? And why does he keep blushing for gods sake?

Another reviewer recommends [b:The Class of 1846: From West Point to Appomattox: Stonewall Jackson, George McClellan, and Their Brothers|477519|The Class of 1846 From West Point to Appomattox Stonewall Jackson, George McClellan, and Their Brothers|John C. Waugh|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1320413537s/477519.jpg|465732] which sounds worth pursuing.

Sticking with fiction, you could get more than enough of the same general time period from [b:The Gates of the Alamo|1063298|The Gates of the Alamo|Stephen Harrigan|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1347223847s/1063298.jpg|1049937] and more fun (with less angst) in [b:The Borderland|519026|The Borderland|Edwin Shrake|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1348269970s/519026.jpg|506942]. ( )
  R0BIN | Apr 27, 2013 |
Very interesting account of the US - Mexican war that took place just before our own civil war. I especially enjoyed the author's accounting of what happened to each of the principal characters afterwards. I was a bit surprised there was nothing mentioned of the famous "boy heroes", Mexican cadets, that lost their lives when Chapultepec fell. ( )
  repb | Apr 23, 2013 |
What a great book about the "Generals to be" in the American Civil War. Shaara discusses the impact of Robert. E. Lee on important battles with Mexico. He also mentions Grant and the possible meeting of the two men. They mention the Irish Brigade who sided with the Mexicans, as a result of their feelings toward the British and their taking of North Ireland, and when captured were shot for dissertion. A great read about early Imperialism of the USA.
  hslone1 | Sep 3, 2011 |
Showing 1-5 of 12 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Shaara, Jeffprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Davis, JonathanNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hearn, GeorgeReadersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Reich, AdamPhotographersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Walker, JamesCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Where have all the young men gone? Gone for soldiers, every one...

-Pete Seeger
"Where Have All the Flowers Gone?"
Dedication
To my friend Ralph Johnson, who for thirty years has been my Winfield Scott
First words
In 1844 the United States is very much a nation feeling its youth. (Introduction)
They had sailed early, cutting southward through the quiet water, the rugged coastline barely visible to the west.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Fiction. Literature. Thriller. Historical Fiction. HTML:In Gone for Soldiers, Jeff Shaara carries us back 15 years before the momentous conflict he has so brilliantly chronicled, to a time when the Civil War's most familiar names are fighting for another cause, junior officers marching under the same flag in an unfamiliar land, experiencing combat for the first time in the Mexican-American War.
In March 1847, 8,000 soldiers landed on the beaches of Vera Cruz, led by the army's commanding general, Winfield Scott-a heroic veteran of the War of 1812, short tempered, vain, and nostalgic for the glories of his youth. At his right hand is Robert E. Lee, a forty year-old engineer, a dignified, serious man who has never seen combat.
In vivid prose that illuminates the dark psychology of soldiers trapped behind enemy lines, Jeff Shaara brings to life the familiar characters, the stunning triumphs and soul-crushing defeats of this fascinating, long-forgotten war.

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