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Working Effectively with Legacy Code

by Michael Feathers

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553531,127 (4.29)3
Get more out of your legacy systems: more performance, functionality, reliability, and manageability Is your code easy to change? Can you get nearly instantaneous feedback when you do change it? Do you understand it? If the answer to any of these questions is no, you have legacy code, and it is draining time and money away from your development efforts. In this book, Michael Feathers offers start-to-finish strategies for working more effectively with large, untested legacy code bases. This book draws on material Michael created for his renowned Object Mentor seminars: techniques Michael has used in mentoring to help hundreds of developers, technical managers, and testers bring their legacy systems under control. adding features, fixing bugs, improving design, optimizing performance Getting legacy code into a test harness Writing tests that protect you against introducing new problems Techniques that can be used with any language or platform--with examples in Java, C++, C, and C# Accurately identifying where code changes need to be made Coping with legacy systems that aren t object-oriented Handling applications that don t seem to have any structureThis book also includes a catalog of twenty-four dependency-breaking techniques that help you work with program elements in isolation and make safer changes. (c) Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.… (more)
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Showing 5 of 5
If you write software with other people, for fun or money, you should read this book. It's the best writing on how to get messy, awful software on the road to sanity, step by incremental step. ( )
  thegreatape | Jan 7, 2020 |
A very detailed manual on how to stop worrying and to get your code under tests. It should say "don't panic" on the cover. It really covers a lot of techniques with their drawbacks and benefits. I can imagine referring back to this book as a reference in hard cases. I did not fully internalize all the methods yet, but what I read in this book is already helping me daily and keeping me more confident about my code as a result. ( )
  valdanylchuk | Aug 26, 2015 |
Great book, but get's kinda tedoius. Abstract interface, abstract implementation, so on and so on. However, I consider it to be a must read for programmers who don't work at startups (ie inevitably deal w/ legacy code). ( )
  sangahn | Aug 20, 2009 |
This book provides some great insight into writing testable code even if you are not dealing with a "legacy" code base. His style is great and it really is an interesting and comfortable read. ( )
  mgholls | Oct 30, 2008 |
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For Ann, Deborah, and Ryan, the bright centers of my life. —Michael
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Get more out of your legacy systems: more performance, functionality, reliability, and manageability Is your code easy to change? Can you get nearly instantaneous feedback when you do change it? Do you understand it? If the answer to any of these questions is no, you have legacy code, and it is draining time and money away from your development efforts. In this book, Michael Feathers offers start-to-finish strategies for working more effectively with large, untested legacy code bases. This book draws on material Michael created for his renowned Object Mentor seminars: techniques Michael has used in mentoring to help hundreds of developers, technical managers, and testers bring their legacy systems under control. adding features, fixing bugs, improving design, optimizing performance Getting legacy code into a test harness Writing tests that protect you against introducing new problems Techniques that can be used with any language or platform--with examples in Java, C++, C, and C# Accurately identifying where code changes need to be made Coping with legacy systems that aren t object-oriented Handling applications that don t seem to have any structureThis book also includes a catalog of twenty-four dependency-breaking techniques that help you work with program elements in isolation and make safer changes. (c) Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

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