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Did Adam and Eve Have Navels?: Debunking Pseudoscience (2000)

by Martin Gardner

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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385354,548 (3.63)7
A witty critique of New Age beliefs and scientific fraud. Topics debunked include paranormal events, Freud's theory of dreams, shamanism and UFOs. As well as providing laughter for sceptics, the book will also give solace and inspiration to those who prize logic and common sense.
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  miketroll | Mar 15, 2007 |
This collection of essays is an interesting criticism of popular pseudoscience, controversial in some areas. Gardner questions the arguments of popular and dubious science, and fringe religious teaching. Includes essays on creationists, astronomy, physics, medicine (reflexology and urine therapy), psychology, social science, UFOs, other fringe sciences, and religion. Criticisms of the Ba'hai, Jewish Caballah, and Islamic numerologists Louis Farrakhan and Dr. Rashad Khalifa, are likely to be controversial.
A healthy dose of scepticism, encouraging for those who prize logic and common sense. ( )
2 vote tripleblessings | Jul 14, 2006 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Gardner, Martinprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Welch, ChrisDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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To Kendrick Frazier, editor of the Skeptical Inquirer, friend, and leader in the never-ceasing battle against superstition, paranormal nonsense, and dubious science.
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Most of the chapters in this collection are attacks on far-out cases of pseudoscience.  (Introduction)
If you ever find yourself in the company of a fundamentalist, much pleasant argumentation can result if you ask him or her a simple question: Did Adam and Eve have belly buttons?
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A witty critique of New Age beliefs and scientific fraud. Topics debunked include paranormal events, Freud's theory of dreams, shamanism and UFOs. As well as providing laughter for sceptics, the book will also give solace and inspiration to those who prize logic and common sense.

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W.W. Norton

An edition of this book was published by W.W. Norton.

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