HomeGroupsTalkExplore
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

If Not, Winter: Fragments of Sappho (2002)

by Sappho

Other authors: Anne Carson (Translator)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,2562413,386 (4.29)28
A bilingual edition of the work of the Greek poet Sappho, in a new translation by Anne Carson. Sappho lived on the island of Lesbos from about 630 b.c. She was a musical genius who devoted her life to composing and performing songs. Of the nine books of lyrics Sappho is said to have composed, none of the music is extant and only one poem has survived complete. All the rest are fragments. InIf Not, WinterCarson presents all of Sappho’s fragments in Greek and in English. Brackets and space give the reader a sense of what is absent as well as what is present on the papyrus. Carson’s translation illuminates Sappho’s reflections on love, desire, marriage, exile, cushions, bees, old age, shame, time, chickpeas and many other aspects of the human situation.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 28 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 24 (next | show all)
"Eros, that slackener of limbs, twirls me again---
bittersweet, untamable, crawling thing.

but you, Atthis, hate the thought of me,
and go flying off to Andromeda"


The poetry of Sappho is incomparably erotic and undeniably beautiful even in small fragments. ( )
  jwhenderson | Nov 27, 2022 |
3.5 ⭐️

I have been wanting to read this book for so long and now I have. Of the fragments that I could understand, or at least make some sense of, I thought that this collection was beautiful. I dearly wish more of Sappho’s poetry and songs had survived because her writings are wonderful. I feel that she has a lot to say about love and other human desires and I just wish I could read more of her work. I am grateful that Anne Carson has translated these pieces of poetry so well and I hope to read some of Carson’s own work at some point too. This is definitely a poetry collection worth the read! ( )
  EvelynNygren | Nov 17, 2022 |
Like an ancient Greek ee cummings. Concupiscent and sumptuous. ( )
  invisiblecityzen | Mar 13, 2022 |
Like an ancient Greek ee cummings. Concupiscent and sumptuous. ( )
  invisiblecityzen | Mar 13, 2022 |
How spellbinding and redolent Sappho's fragments are. In their spaces, incompleteness, and briefness lie the beauty of a thousand interpretations and perceptions. Indeed, it's quite a waste to think that most of her works are lost forever and that we must rely on our imagination in envisioning this stunning arrangement of words ("sweetworded desires", "goldsandaled Dawn", "piercing breezes") sung accompanied by the gentleness of the lyre — wooing, proclaiming, praising. Other than Sappho's indubitable genius as a poet, Anne Carson's translation is not to be missed. Each "]" that designates parts of a papyrus indecipherable / destroyed hints of a much grandeur whole. All is felt and guessed. Moreover, Carson's section for Notes provides fascinating insight on some of her literary decisions regarding the translation, some points theorise for what / for whom perhaps a certain fragment is for. I also marvelled on some of the influences included.

"I don't know what to do
two states of mind in me"
— FRAGMENT 51

"you came and I was crazy for you
and you cooled my mind that burned with longing"
— FRAGMENT 48

Throughout the course of reading this, I tend to forget what's missing due to their sheer brilliance alone ("mingled with all kinds of colors", "both you and my servant Eros", "may you sleep on the breast of your delicate friend"). I'd like to think the lost / destroyed papyri have been sieved; a matrimony with the earth. Oh how much more in their wholeness? Currently, this book is resting on my bed and I sleep beside it. All these nights I leaf through it, more so when sleep would not come, comforting myself with pictures they form in my head; an intimate commune I built for Sappho and me. What an experience. ( )
2 vote lethalmauve | Jan 25, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 24 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Sapphoprimary authorall editionscalculated
Carson, AnneTranslatorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Information from the Russian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Epigraph
Dedication
For Emmett Robbins,
Beloved Teacher
/
With Special Thanks to
Dorota Dutsch
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

A bilingual edition of the work of the Greek poet Sappho, in a new translation by Anne Carson. Sappho lived on the island of Lesbos from about 630 b.c. She was a musical genius who devoted her life to composing and performing songs. Of the nine books of lyrics Sappho is said to have composed, none of the music is extant and only one poem has survived complete. All the rest are fragments. InIf Not, WinterCarson presents all of Sappho’s fragments in Greek and in English. Brackets and space give the reader a sense of what is absent as well as what is present on the papyrus. Carson’s translation illuminates Sappho’s reflections on love, desire, marriage, exile, cushions, bees, old age, shame, time, chickpeas and many other aspects of the human situation.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
If Not, Winter irresistibly combines the ancient mysteries of Sappho with the contemporary wizardry of acclaimed poet and classicist Anne Carson in what is sure to become the standard translation of Sappho for our time. Presented with the Greek on facing pages, her verses appear here as if on the ragged scraps of papyrus that preserve them. Together with Carson’s introduction and notes, they provide a tantalizing window into Sappho’s genius.
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (4.29)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2
2.5 3
3 18
3.5 8
4 71
4.5 10
5 80

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 183,023,553 books! | Top bar: Always visible