HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Wait Until Spring, Bandini (1938)

by John Fante

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Bandini (2)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,0891414,820 (3.9)17
He came along, kicking the snow. Here was a disgusted man. His name was Svevo Bandini, and he lived three blocks down that street. He was cold and there were holes in his shoes. That morning he had patched the holes on the inside with pieces of cardboard from a macaroni box. The macaroni in that box was not paid for. He had thought of that as he placed the cardboard inside his shoes.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 17 mentions

English (8)  Italian (3)  Spanish (2)  French (1)  All languages (14)
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
The plot of this book is pretty much nonexistent, the characters never deviate from their stereotypes, and to top it off the dialogues gave me the impression that the whole thing played out like one of these crummy family 90s movies (where the realism?). Fante's dictionary is stunning, and as a non-native speaker, his work undoubtedly enriched mine, yet at some point I got genuinely fed up with his unusual and clunky style. The author could have benefited from a straightforward prose, but instead he stuck with his dull stream of consciousnesses revolving around a super hormonal dirt poor and dense kid's wishes to bang his classmate and his weird obsession for baseball players, not to mention his uncommon choice of fancy words. Bukowski had a thing for Fante, but this novel is and will always be nothing like Ham on Rye. I will look into his other works in the hope that Arturo Bandini will turn out to be less of a daydreaming imbecile as well, because that's one of the main things that turned my stomach throughout the novel. ( )
  Vertumnus | Jul 22, 2021 |
This was a simple story of Italian immigrants struggling to survive in Colorado’s harsh winters. It made me angry at the parents, both of them and sad for them and their sons.
My mom was an Italian immigrant living in NYC and the novel reminded me of stories she told of having bread for breakfast and a fried egg for lunch. How she was ridiculed by her classmates for wearing the same dress to school each and every day. Bothe the novel and my mom’s stories made me feel sad ( )
  AstridG | Mar 8, 2020 |
I was really surprised by how much I liked this book. The prose was unassuming but able to communicate the inner and outer lives of each character with seamless transition. Fante had such a natural command of voice and character that the novel's structure just sort of fell into place. He may dazzle with high modernist pretensions of language play and aureate description but those literary foundations are all here in humble, utilitarian expression. You could actually draw a line from Henry James to this novel if you wanted to be all highfalutin about it.

I highly recommend this book. It is a quick and unassuming read but the narrative machinations are sophisticated lessons in how to erase oneself as an author. ( )
  Adrian_Astur_Alvarez | Dec 3, 2019 |
I was really surprised by how much I liked this book. The prose was unassuming but able to communicate the inner and outer lives of each character with seamless transition. Fante had such a natural command of voice and character that the novel's structure just sort of fell into place. He may dazzle with high modernist pretensions of language play and aureate description but those literary foundations are all here in humble, utilitarian expression. You could actually draw a line from Henry James to this novel if you wanted to be all highfalutin about it.

I highly recommend this book. It is a quick and unassuming read but the narrative machinations are sophisticated lessons in how to erase oneself as an author. ( )
  Adrian_Astur_Alvarez | Dec 3, 2019 |
Like I have seen in a lot of other comments about this book, I discovered Fante via Bukowski. This, to date, is the only book I have read by him but I found it brilliant. Very absorbing and beautiful. I really ought to finish the quartet when I can as I have heard things really get going in The Road to Los Angeles and Ask the Dust. ( )
  rimbo90 | Mar 28, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (5 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Fante, Johnprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Ammaniti, NiccoloForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Corsi, CarloTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Flothuis, MeaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schouten, MartinAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Trevi, EmanueleContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
He came along, kicking the deep snow.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

He came along, kicking the snow. Here was a disgusted man. His name was Svevo Bandini, and he lived three blocks down that street. He was cold and there were holes in his shoes. That morning he had patched the holes on the inside with pieces of cardboard from a macaroni box. The macaroni in that box was not paid for. He had thought of that as he placed the cardboard inside his shoes.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.9)
0.5 1
1
1.5
2 7
2.5 4
3 53
3.5 19
4 98
4.5 7
5 57

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

Canongate Books

An edition of this book was published by Canongate Books.

» Publisher information page

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 170,011,064 books! | Top bar: Always visible