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Wake Up, Sir! by Jonathan Ames
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Wake Up, Sir! (2004)

by Jonathan Ames

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Showing 1-5 of 19 (next | show all)
I wish Jeeves were more omnipotent and omniscient. ( )
  gregrr | Oct 30, 2018 |
Ames can capture P. G. Wodehouse's writing style quite well, and often he exceeds Wodehouse's humor. However, where Wodehouse's plots were either genuinely innovative or the stuff of pulp novels, Ames tries too hard to be quirky and unexpected. In the end, the wackiness just doesn't add up to much, story- or character-wise. ( )
  mrgan | Oct 30, 2017 |
Wake Up, Sir! by Jonathan Ames
1.5 stars, rounded to 2

Although this book got off to a rollicking start and it seemed as though it would be 3 or 4 stars like most of the Wooster and Jeeves books this is a play on, and although there were some funny scenes, it just wasn't for me due to some of the key differences between the two fools, Bertie Wooster in the original and Alan Blair in this book.

Alan Blair is an American agnostic Jew, a struggling writer who received a quarter of a million dollars in a lawsuit and so hired a personal valet, Jeeves, and certainly he notes that he likes the name because of Wodehouse's books. I am not going to give a plot summary. Suffice to say that the reason this book failed for me is because much of the humour was darker, playing off of Blair's depression, neuroses and deep alcoholism, and while in the TV show Monk's neuroses were funny, I just don't find depression or alcoholism funny, nor drunk people. Although there was a marijuana scene I found rather funny, which was a bit of a surprise, but I don't want to say why in case this is a book you like.

Jonathan Ames can certainly write humour, it just wasn't my cup of tea. ( )
  Karin7 | Jan 20, 2016 |
A pitch perfect style-parody of P. G. Wodehouse, or more specifically of Bertie Wooster, "Wake Up, Sir!" is a book with a target audience so vanishingly small that it's a wonder it was every published. But being a member of that target audience, I enjoyed every syllable.

The juxtaposition of the modern setting and sexual topics with the Wodehousian prose afforded not a little enjoyment. Ames has an ear for the well placed metaphor which, if not the rival of Wodehouse, is at least in the same style.

I keep comparing to Wodehouse, but "Wake Up, Sir!" is a story in its own right, with an engaging cast of characters and some interesting embedded philosophy. It's a bit scattered, and feels like a selection of a much longer story, or perhaps that's just because it is a slice of a much longer life. Either way, this has made me likely to pick up something else by Ames in the future, although I will be a bit disappointed when I get a voice other than Bertie Wooster's.

Highly recommended for Wodehouse fans. For anyone else, you'll have to make up your own mind. ( )
  shabacus | Aug 11, 2015 |
This is not an attempt to make another Jeeves and Wooster book. Jeeves is a device for the hero of the book to cope with his alcoholism and there is a Wodehouse style to the dialogue but don't think you are getting a Jeeves adventure here. If that is what you are after you will be disappointed. However if you are after a good comedy yarn then this should definitely satisfy. Quirky and enjoyable. ( )
  polarbear123 | Aug 5, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 19 (next | show all)
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Epigraph
"Live and don't learn - that's my motto." (Alan Blair)
Dedication
"For Blair Clark and Alan Jolis (in memory)"
First words
"'Wake up, sir. Wake up,' said Jeeves."
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 074344907X, Paperback)

Alan Blair, the hero of Wake Up, Sir!, is a young, loony writer with numerous problems of the mental, emotional, sexual, spiritual, and physical variety. He's very good at problems. But luckily for Alan, he has a personal valet named Jeeves, who does his best to sort things out for his troubled master. And Alan does find trouble wherever he goes. He embarks on a perilous and bizarre road journey, his destination being an artists colony in Saratoga Springs. There Alan encounters a gorgeous femme fatale who is in possession of the most spectacular nose in the history of noses. Such a nose can only lead to a wild disaster for someone like Alan, and Jeeves tries to help him, but...

Well, read the book and find out!

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:21:38 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

Alan Blair is a ne'er-do-well New Jerseyite who has failed to follow his first novel, "I Pity I," published seven years ago, with a second. At thirty, he's alcoholic, afraid of confronting the bellicose uncle with whom he lives, and would be penniless but for an accident settlement. His most treasured possessions are a collection of dubious sports coats and a valet, who just happens to be named Jeeves. As you'd expect, Jeeves is circumspect, judicious, and ready at hand; what he may not be is real.… (more)

» see all 3 descriptions

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