HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Eight Black Horses (1985)

by Ed McBain

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: 87th: Deaf Man (4), 87th Precinct (38)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3641055,553 (3.71)6
Finding a dead body was not unusual for an autumn night in the 87th Precinct. But this young woman's body was naked--and potentially related to the series of odd missives received at the station house. All signs point to the Deaf Man's return, this time with a plot more diabolical than even the jaded policemen could imagine. He's been sending them mysterious pictures of police equipment: nightsticks, helmets, black horses, and more. But what did they mean? Detective Steve Carella would be one of the first to find out, but only after he discovered that the Deaf Man was impersonating him, which leads to more violence. Now, Carella and his fellow officers must face down the Deaf Man in a lethal confrontation: a confrontation more surprising, shocking, and explosive than anything the cops of the 87th Precinct have ever experienced. Eight Black Horses is an inventive, tightly woven 87th Precinct novel--and it's Ed McBain at his incomparable best.… (more)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 6 mentions

English (9)  German (1)  All languages (10)
Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
The Deaf Man is back, and is sending messages to the 87th Street Precinct, starting with a dead, nude blonde in the park across the street from the station house. As always he is plotting a sensational theft and revenge on the detectives who always seem to foil his plans. Once again, through some luck and some clumsiness, major calamity is avoided. ( )
  skipstern | Jul 11, 2021 |
“The Deaf Man arrived, and suddenly the circus was back in town.” And I’m back for the Deaf Man vs. the 87th Precinct - Part 4! And I'm also back for the writing, like the first sentence in the book, "The lady was extraordinarily naked." and this line, "Mean, though, still as mean as a hooker's snatch." … Right? Raw, descriptive, and enjoyably unique!
This was a fun read, good crisp writing, and quickly devoured by me! Set against the 12 days of Christmas, the Deaf Man sends cryptic clues to the 87th in advance of his latest criminal escapade. And they attempt to defeat him. And so it goes...
4 good reads in a row with this lineup, and I'm looking forward to the last two! ( )
  Stahl-Ricco | Jan 12, 2019 |
Steve Carella and Arthur Brown catch the murder of young white woman found in a park naked and with a bullet wound in her neck. Meanwhile, the Deaf Man has come back into their lives by sending in the mail sheets of paper of police items such as badges, hats, batons and guns plus horses. As they stew over what these hints to a big crime might mean, another woman is killed . Are the murders and Deaf Man's plans connected?

Meanwhile, the Deaf Man is planning a big robbery plus an even bigger coup against Carella and the 87th which decimate their numbers. ( )
  lamour | Apr 23, 2018 |
I’ve read a lot of Ed McBain and since the special Kindle sale a while back that offered some 40 of his titles for .99 each, I know have a lot more to read. Not in any order.

I have often wondered about McBain’s (nee Evan Hunter) sexual experience. If you’ve read Candyland, for example, his familiarity with massage parlors struck me as coming from personal experience. Then again, his portrayal of police procedures seem quite real, also. Nevertheless, the Deaf Man’s libidic (probably not a word, but I like it) prowess in this book with a woman he has designs upon, made me a little uncomfortable. It shouldn’t have, and I hope I’ve not getting Victorian in my dotage.

Never has Isola’s characteristics been so prominently displayed. And it so resembles New York. “The center of the city, Isola, was an island; hence its name: isola means “island” in Italian. In actual practice the entire city was referred to as Isola, even though the other four sections were separately and more imaginatively named. Riverhead came from the Dutch, though not directly. The land up there had once been owned by a patroon named Ryerhurt, and it had been called Ryerhurt’s Farms, which eventually became abbreviated and bastardized to Riverhead. No one knew why...”

I really like McBain, but the ones which feature the Deaf Man are my least favorite. His personal animus toward Carella and brilliance seem phantasmagorical. The personal animus displayed by a criminal toward a policeman always seems very artificial, although to McBain’s credit, the Deaf Man manipulates the police department into becoming part of his schemes. “At first Carella had supposed this to be evidence of a monumental ego, but he had come to learn that the Deaf Man used the police as a sort of second pickup gang, larger than the nucleus group, but equally essential to the successful commission of the crime. That he had been thwarted on three previous occasions was entirely due to chance. He was smarter than the police, and he used the police, and he let the police know they were being used.” ( )
  ecw0647 | Sep 30, 2013 |
i always enjoy returning to the 87th precinct. a fun, easy read. ( )
  overlycriticalelisa | Apr 2, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (8 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Ed McBainprimary authorall editionscalculated
Negretti, AndreinaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Information from the Italian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Finding a dead body was not unusual for an autumn night in the 87th Precinct. But this young woman's body was naked--and potentially related to the series of odd missives received at the station house. All signs point to the Deaf Man's return, this time with a plot more diabolical than even the jaded policemen could imagine. He's been sending them mysterious pictures of police equipment: nightsticks, helmets, black horses, and more. But what did they mean? Detective Steve Carella would be one of the first to find out, but only after he discovered that the Deaf Man was impersonating him, which leads to more violence. Now, Carella and his fellow officers must face down the Deaf Man in a lethal confrontation: a confrontation more surprising, shocking, and explosive than anything the cops of the 87th Precinct have ever experienced. Eight Black Horses is an inventive, tightly woven 87th Precinct novel--and it's Ed McBain at his incomparable best.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.71)
0.5
1 1
1.5 1
2 1
2.5
3 15
3.5 6
4 21
4.5 1
5 9

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 164,524,051 books! | Top bar: Always visible