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Planet X by Michael Jan Friedman
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415940,886 (3.01)4
Another title in the Star Trek - The Next Generation series.

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» See also 4 mentions

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I am embarrassed to say that I read this, but it looked short and funny and I just finished reading a whole bunch of Xmen comics. For what it is, which is pretty much just fan-fic crossover, it's not that bad.

So the Xmen somehow end up in the Star Trek universe. How this happens, not really explained and apparently this has happened before. At the same time there is a planet that is currently producing mutants. Shocking coincidence. This planet decides to lock up the mutants, or transformed as they call themselves, which they promptly escape. Aliens show up to steal the transformed. The reasoning behind all this is briefly summed up in the last few pages and it really isn't important. This book was written so that Wolverine and Worf could beat up aliens together.

I would recommend this book to those who REALLY like Star Trek and X-Men. If you are just a fan of their one, probably not the book you are looking for. ( )
  nmorse | Dec 3, 2019 |
Michael Jan Friedman’s Star Trek: The Next Generation/X-Men: Planet X is a delightful crossover that shouldn’t work, but somehow does and will entertain fans of both franchises who can remember the heyday of 1990s nerd culture. It appeared when both Star Trek and the X-Men were at the heights of their respective franchises’ popularity and captures the essence of what made both great. The story itself takes place during the Dominion War, with the Enterprise-E on its way to Starbase 42 for a conference between the Federation and their Klingon allies. Lt. Commander Worf joins the Enterprise along the way for his expertise (pg. 20), but the ship must divert when the X-Men appear on Starbase 88. When last the Enterprise crew met them, they were transported to the X-Men’s timeline shortly after the events of Star Trek: First Contact due to the effects of the time-traveling Kang the Conqueror’s timehook (pg. 53). While the Enterprise and her crew returned to their proper time, the X-Men found themselves pulled along in the time wake, arriving twelve months later. Now, the X-Men may be able to help the Federation as people on Xhaldia are mutating upon reaching the age of 22. Meanwhile, an unknown alien race called the Draa’kon has attacked the planet, seeking to capture the transformed people of Xhaldia. The Enterprise crew and the X-Men will have to combine their respective unique talents and personalities to save the transformed from the Draa’kon and from Xhaldian persecution.

Friedman clearly has fun thinking up interactions between the X-Men and the Enterprise crew. For example, Storm and Captain Jean-Luc Picard have something of a flirtationship (pgs. 50-57), Worf and Wolverine bond as warriors (pgs. 70-74), and Data can harmonize with Banshee (pg. 99). He also works in references to “The Inner Light” (pg. 56), “Hide and Q” (pg. 222), Q, the Traveler, the Founders, and more (pg. 48). Further, he includes references to two of the great Marvel creators by naming members of Worf’s away team Ditko and Kirby (pg. 167). Though Professor Xavier does not appear in this story, Dr. Beverly Crusher creates a holographic simulation of him to consult with about the transformed Xhaldians, noting the “resemblance” between the Professor and Captain Picard (pg. 199). Best of all, Friedman made this connection two years before Patrick Stewart portrayed Professor X in the first X-Men film.

This is the third Star Trek/X-Men crossover. The first was a 1996 comic written by Scott Lobdell and featured the X-Men meeting Captain Kirk and the crew of the original Enterprise during its five-year mission. In the second, Dan Abnett and Ian Edginton described the crew of the Enterprise-E meeting the X-Men after the events of Star Trek: First Contact. These stories were made possible by Marvel’s brief Paramount Comics line, under which they published their licensed Star Trek comics based on the various series and original titles like Starfleet Academy and Early Voyages. Here, Friedman concludes the crossovers with the X-Men, with an epilogue that’s particularly fitting for both franchises. Strange as this Star Trek/X-Men crossover may seem, Trek has since crossed over with DC’s Legion of Superheroes in 2011-2012, with Doctor Who in 2012, with Planet of the Apes in 2014-2015, with DC’s Green Lantern twice in 2015, and with the Transformers franchise in 2018-2019, though all of the crossovers after the X-Men occurred exclusively in comic book form and were facilitated by IDW holding the Star Trek comic license. ( )
  DarthDeverell | Aug 6, 2019 |
When I read this as a kid, I was blown away. I became obsessed with the X-Men. (Yes, this obscure Star Trek novel was my introduction to the X-Men and contributed to my eventual love of comics in a not-insignificant way). Reading it again as an adult, well... meh. Most of the book is the mutants and crewmembers talking to each other. So, it's a nice expansion of the usual comic-book crossover stuff where you never get enough of that, but the plot is bland with no suspense, and because the characters have to go back to their own realities, there's not actually any point to all this relationship-building. I liked that it tied into the previous crossover comics, though. ( )
  FFortuna | Oct 5, 2017 |
I really wasn't equipped to read this book, my only experience with the "X-Men" being the first of the movies starring Patrick Stewart as Professor Xavier. I am a die-hard Next Gen fan. With this little to go on, I felt like the book was an excuse to get the two worlds together. Were I to be well-versed in both, I'm sure I would have been excited by this venture. As it was, the plot felt thin. I did, however, enjoy the twist at the end (only half of which I understood, of course: Q showing up and taking credit for the exploits of the characters). ( )
  dysmonia | Apr 15, 2014 |
I really wasn't equipped to read this book, my only experience with the "X-Men" being the first of the movies starring Patrick Stewart as Professor Xavier. I am a die-hard Next Gen fan. With this little to go on, I felt like the book was an excuse to get the two worlds together. Were I to be well-versed in both, I'm sure I would have been excited by this venture. As it was, the plot felt thin. I did, however, enjoy the twist at the end (only half of which I understood, of course: Q showing up and taking credit for the exploits of the characters). ( )
  dysmonia | Apr 15, 2014 |
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"I will be a new person," Erid Sovar told his friends, savoring the warmth of the afternoon sun on his face.
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