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Pegasus Bridge: June 6, 1944 (1985)

by Stephen E. Ambrose

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1,0181815,158 (3.9)14
In the early morning hours of June 6, 1944, a small detachment of British airborne troops stormed the German defense forces and paved the way for the Allied invasion of Europe. Pegasus Bridge was the first engagement of D-Day, the turning point of World War II. This gripping account of it by acclaimed author Stephen Ambrose brings to life a daring mission so crucial that, had it been unsuccessful, the entire Normandy invasion might have failed. Ambrose traces each step of the preparations over many months to the minute-by-minute excitement of the hand-to-hand confrontations on the bridge. This is a story of heroism and cowardice, kindness and brutality--the stuff of all great adventures.… (more)
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English (17)  Dutch (1)  All languages (18)
Showing 1-5 of 17 (next | show all)
I read this book because I was interested in the glider aspect; I hadn't realized gliders had been utilized in World War II. While light on the aviation side, this book was nonetheless pretty fascinating even though I'm really not into war stories. ( )
  lemontwist | May 9, 2021 |
WWII taking of bridge during D-Day. ( )
  addunn3 | Nov 22, 2020 |
Not going to say much, I even find it strange giving a book about real life events stars. This is immensely interesting and makes you realise how brave were these men. Thank you Major Howard and his men and thank you Stephen E. Ambrose for bringing their stories to the world. ( )
  GWReviewDabbler | Aug 8, 2020 |
Detallada y fluida narración de los primeros momentos de la liberación de Europa. Muy recomendable. ( )
  LuisBermer | Sep 2, 2018 |
Short book which focuses on the British 6th Airborne Division's task of securing the D-Day inland bridges around the city of Caen, Northern France. Not the most exciting book but it does give the reader a reason for the 50th anniversary of the D-Day Invasion which took place in 1984. The German leader of the Panzer corp in Normandy says that Rommel himself said the war was lost once the Afrika Corps was chased from Northern Africa. Hitler was insane and couldn't be counted on to war a military campaign. That conversation might have happened but we have to rely on on the German armor leader for that opinion. Brave men are given their due as the airborne troops were wasted by not being reinforced until the units were totally devastated. Blame is not assigned but it was the Montgomery who would return to waste more airborne troops in another fiasco later in the war.
The thing which I hadn't known previously was the order of battle which brought the invasion forces in in three phases. First, the Pathfinders paratroopers who jumped in alone to light directional fires for the tow and glider planes. Then the glider forces, and lastly the airborne troops jumping from low altitude. German indecision among the tank force allowed the airborne British to take the initative before the Panzer tanks could seal off the landing beaches from the troops assauting the beach. For military buffs only or relatives of the airborne troopers themselves. These glider forces and paratroopers are now part of military history legend as if they all survived the Longest Day of battle. That was not the case, and this book memorializes those who didn't make it back home while still marveling at the courage it took to accomplish their mission.
  sacredheart25 | Jan 8, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 17 (next | show all)
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For Hugh, with whom I've watched so many John Wayne movies, here is another adventure story – except that this time it is all true
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In the early morning hours of June 6, 1944, a small detachment of British airborne troops stormed the German defense forces and paved the way for the Allied invasion of Europe. Pegasus Bridge was the first engagement of D-Day, the turning point of World War II. This gripping account of it by acclaimed author Stephen Ambrose brings to life a daring mission so crucial that, had it been unsuccessful, the entire Normandy invasion might have failed. Ambrose traces each step of the preparations over many months to the minute-by-minute excitement of the hand-to-hand confrontations on the bridge. This is a story of heroism and cowardice, kindness and brutality--the stuff of all great adventures.

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