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Auschwitz and the Allies

by Martin Gilbert

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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1776119,481 (3.56)2
When Hitler announced that the result of the war in Europe would be 'the complete annihilation of the Jews', he did so in 1942, not only in public, but before an enormous crowd in Berlin. The Allies heard, but, astonishingly, they did not listen. In 1944, Allied reconnaissance pilots, searching out industrial targets in the area, repeatedly photographed Auschwitz. The pictures, apparently overlooked by the Allies, were routinely filed in government archives and not examined until 1979. First-hand reports on the horrors of the death camps came to the West by 1944 in the person of two escaped Auschwitz prisoners. Their testimonies, and those of subsequent escapees, were either ignored or dismissed. Despite the fact that, the same year, Churchill himself had ordered feasibility studies for air strikes on Auschwitz, the RAF not only did nothing, but eventually passed the buck to the Americans, who also did nothing. This book explains the reasons why.… (more)
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» See also 2 mentions

English (4)  Italian (2)  All languages (6)
Showing 4 of 4
Acquired 2014
  jgsgblib | Feb 23, 2015 |
A documented account of Auschwitz ( )
  GlenRalph | Jul 19, 2009 |
This is a really good book on how the Allies, specifically the United States, did (or in many cases, did not do) about information they were getting throughout WWII about the Holocaust. The author makes some really good conclusions, not all that I agree with. However, it's a really good book and I definitely recommend it. ( )
  Angelic55blonde | Jun 29, 2007 |
A very eminent British historian - now Sirt Martin - gives his answer to the question, what did the Western Allies really know about the holocaust when it was happening.

The book is full of things people really do not know or do not want to know.

The author is very careful to avoid all sensationalism and all sweeping generalisationsa.
  jukke | Nov 24, 2006 |
Showing 4 of 4
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Gilbert, MartinAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Siber, Karl HeinzTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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When Hitler announced that the result of the war in Europe would be 'the complete annihilation of the Jews', he did so in 1942, not only in public, but before an enormous crowd in Berlin. The Allies heard, but, astonishingly, they did not listen. In 1944, Allied reconnaissance pilots, searching out industrial targets in the area, repeatedly photographed Auschwitz. The pictures, apparently overlooked by the Allies, were routinely filed in government archives and not examined until 1979. First-hand reports on the horrors of the death camps came to the West by 1944 in the person of two escaped Auschwitz prisoners. Their testimonies, and those of subsequent escapees, were either ignored or dismissed. Despite the fact that, the same year, Churchill himself had ordered feasibility studies for air strikes on Auschwitz, the RAF not only did nothing, but eventually passed the buck to the Americans, who also did nothing. This book explains the reasons why.

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