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A Vision (1925)

by W. B. Yeats

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324280,943 (3.69)9
Contents: a packet for Ezra Pound; stories of Michael Robartes and his friends: an extract from a record made by his pupils; phases of moon; great wheel; completed symbol; soul in judgment; great year of ancients; dove or swan; all soul's night, an epilogue. With many figures and illustrations.
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French (1)  English (1)  All languages (2)
I have read portions of Yeats' "A Vision" quoted online, seeking to determine what and how Yeats learned ancient source texts.
Apparently Yeats wanted to look into cabbalistic texts
to derive his system of personality, but never actually did. Instead, it looks like Yeats stopped at the language barrier and depended on others to digest source material. Thus it seems Yeats' system is based on his understanding of his aquaintances' translations/interpretations to him.

In a similar situation, James Joyce actually learned the languages of original cabbalistic texts. Joyce's written works after his cabbala are, linguistically, remarkably different than before. At least a great change in Joyce's writing is approximately close enough to his own language study, learning to read Hebrew and Aramaic, to speculate that the material in original languages added to his reading, influenced him toward the subjective shorthand he adopted in his writing style. Joyce became the adopted "bohemian" or son-in-law mentioned in my comments and reveiews of Sir Walter Scott and Robert Louis Stevenson/
  AndAllThat | Sep 18, 2008 |
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"This way of publishing introductions to books , that are God knows when to come out, is either wholly new, or so long in practice that my small reading cannot trace it."- Swift
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The other day, Lady Gregory said to me : "You are a much better educated man than you were ten years ago and much more powerful in argument".
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Contents: a packet for Ezra Pound; stories of Michael Robartes and his friends: an extract from a record made by his pupils; phases of moon; great wheel; completed symbol; soul in judgment; great year of ancients; dove or swan; all soul's night, an epilogue. With many figures and illustrations.

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