HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Does My Head Look Big In This? (2005)

by Randa Abdel-Fattah

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,3017711,834 (3.63)51
Year Eleven at an exclusive prep school in the suburbs of Melbourne, Australia, would be tough enough, but it is further complicated for Amal when she decides to wear the hijab, the Muslim head scarf, full-time as a badge of her faith--without losing her identity or sense of style.
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 51 mentions

English (74)  Swedish (1)  Italian (1)  German (1)  All languages (77)
Showing 1-5 of 74 (next | show all)
Funny and thoughtful novel about a teen who decides to begin to wear a head scarf for religious reasons.
  Lake_Oswego_UCC | Feb 6, 2022 |
Book for muslim women which emphasize the struggles of a muslim women
  AbeerShameem | Oct 20, 2021 |
Regardless of its contents, I think I'd have considered this book worthwhile simply because of how great it is to see a YA book with the covergirl wearing the hijab. I can't even begin to comprehend just how invalidating it must feel for so many teenagers to head to the YA section of a library or book shop just to be faced by cover after endless cover of white, skinny models with no indication whatsoever of cultural or religious diversity. (And I am not going to go into the whitewashing of characters by publishers or film-makers here, because it's all just too depressing and anger-making.)

I have to say, though, that my hopes for Does My Head Look Big In This? weren't entirely met. I think the main issue for me was that it felt extremely fragmented. It was like the author wanted to deal with a hundred different plot points and, instead of choosing a few to concentrate one, decided to put them all in. Because of this, everything felt a little shallow and unfinished. There was so much room for conflict and resolution in many of the plot points raised (for example, the whole Amal/Adam storyline, which gave a wonderful opportunity for Amal to confront temptation and examine the reality of her choices, but instead just kind of flopped), but even the dramatic story surrounding Leila and her family felt rushed and a little forced.

In the end, this meant that I liked this book a lot more for what it represents than what it actually is. I think it's so very important that teenagers of all races, cultures and religions feel represented in mainstream fiction. As a work of fiction, however, it left me feeling decidedly apathetic.
  Tara_Calaby | Jun 22, 2020 |
Aaah, så fräsch och även så lärorik. ( )
  autisticluke | Nov 14, 2019 |
I did not love this book at all. I found the main character to be very whiney and naive. I felt like it had the potential to be a coming of age story, but in the end it just felt like I was re-living teenager hood through the eyes of another person. I enjoyed listening to the perspectives on difficult cultures, and I believe that was a great angle for a story. I do not understand what people of other cultures go through, nor do I understand what racism looks like in other countries. Unfortunately, I felt that that was clouded by annoying characters. ( )
  startwithgivens | Dec 4, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 74 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (4 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Randa Abdel-Fattahprimary authorall editionscalculated
Ganslandt, KatarinaÜbersetzersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
To Mum and Dad for your faith in me. To Nada, my sister, for encouraging me. To Ibrahim, my husband, for supporting me.
First words
It hit me when I was power walking on the treadmill at home, watching a Friends rerun for about the nineteenth time.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Year Eleven at an exclusive prep school in the suburbs of Melbourne, Australia, would be tough enough, but it is further complicated for Amal when she decides to wear the hijab, the Muslim head scarf, full-time as a badge of her faith--without losing her identity or sense of style.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.63)
0.5 2
1 5
1.5
2 17
2.5 7
3 80
3.5 30
4 111
4.5 18
5 39

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 171,549,096 books! | Top bar: Always visible