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Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood

by Marjane Satrapi

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Persepolis (Omnibus 1-2)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
7,770307945 (4.18)360
An intelligent and outspoken only child, Satrapi--the daughter of radical Marxists and the great-granddaughter of Iran's last emperor--bears witness to a childhood uniquely entwined with the history of her country. Originally published to wide critical acclaim in France, where it elicited comparisons to Art Spiegelman's Maus, Persepolis is Marjane Satrapi's wise, funny, and heartbreaking memoir of growing up in Iran during the Islamic Revolution. In powerful black-and-white comic strip images, Satrapi tells the story of her life in Tehran from ages six to fourteen, years that saw the overthrow of the Shah's regime, the triumph of the Islamic Revolution, and the devastating effects of war with Iraq. The intelligent and outspoken only child of committed Marxists and the great-granddaughter of one of Iran's last emperors, Marjane bears witness to a childhood uniquely entwined with the history of her country. Persepolis paints an unforgettable portrait of daily life in Iran: of the bewildering contradictions between home life and public life and of the enormous toll repressive regimes exact on the individual spirit. Marjane's child's-eye-view of dethroned emperors, state-sanctioned whippings, and heroes of the revolution allows us to learn as she does the history of this fascinating country and of her own extraordinary family. Intensely personal, profoundly political, and wholly original, Persepolis is at once a story of growing up and a stunning reminder of the human cost of war and political repression. It shows how we carry on, through laughter and tears, in the face of absurdity. And, finally, it introduces us to an irresistible little girl with whom we cannot help but fall in love.… (more)
Recently added byjaynic9, FenrirJH, private library, Bixidu, bioport, gvclibrarian, euxikufi
  1. 110
    Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic by Alison Bechdel (teelgee)
  2. 80
    Maus II: A Survivor's Tale: And Here My Troubles Began by Art Spiegelman (Tjarda)
  3. 30
    Journey from the Land of No: A Girlhood Caught in Revolutionary Iran by Roya Hakakian (cransell)
    cransell: A complementary (non-graphic) look at growing up in Iran during the Revolution.
  4. 30
    A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini (Eustrabirbeonne)
  5. 30
    Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir in Books by Azar Nafisi (Eustrabirbeonne)
  6. 20
    Psychiatric Tales: Eleven Graphic Stories About Mental Illness by Darryl Cunningham (vnovak)
    vnovak: In the introduction to Psychiatric Tales, Darryl Cunningham said that he was inspired to write it after reading Persepolis. They share a spare, black and white style and a empathetic view of difficult topics.
  7. 20
    The Rabbi's Cat: The Bar Mitzvah / Malka of the Lions / Exodus by Joann Sfar (Eustrabirbeonne)
  8. 20
    The House of the Mosque by Kader Abdolah (souloftherose)
    souloftherose: Both books show the effects of the Iranian Revolution of 1979 on Iranian families. The House of the Mosque shows its effect on a Muslim family whereas Persepolis shows its effect on a more secular family. Both authors are writing from their own experience… (more)
  9. 20
    Stitches: A Memoir by David Small (jlparent)
    jlparent: Another wonderfully done graphic novel memoir about a difficult childhood.
  10. 10
    Epileptic by David B. (yabyak)
  11. 10
    Blankets by Craig Thompson (Hibou8)
  12. 10
    Nylon Road: A Graphic Memoir of Coming of Age in Iran by Parsua Bashi (ijustgetbored)
    ijustgetbored: Another coming-of-age memoir in Iran.
  13. 10
    Forget Sorrow: An Ancestral Tale by Belle Yang (bogreader)
  14. 10
    My Father's Notebook by Kader Abdolah (Tjarda)
  15. 00
    The Heartbreak Diet: A Story of Family, Fidelity, and Starting Over by Thorina Rose (k00kaburra)
    k00kaburra: Another autobiographical graphic novel :-p that's a mouthful!
  16. 00
    The Arab of the Future: A Childhood in the Middle East, 1978-1984: A Graphic Memoir by Riad Sattouf (TomCat14)
  17. 00
    Die Birnen von Ribbeck by Friedrich Christian Delius (EerierIdyllMeme)
    EerierIdyllMeme: Life at a personal level under various political regimes, told in an unconventional way.
  18. 11
    Mostly Miniatures: An Introduction to Persian Painting by Oleg Grabar (Eustrabirbeonne)
  19. 00
    When I Was Puerto Rican by Esmeralda Santiago (jilld17)
  20. 00
    Memed, My Hawk by Yasar Kemal (Eustrabirbeonne)

(see all 20 recommendations)

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» See also 360 mentions

English (297)  Danish (2)  Italian (2)  Japanese (1)  Swedish (1)  Dutch (1)  Spanish (1)  Finnish (1)  All languages (306)
Showing 1-5 of 297 (next | show all)
My review of this book can be found on my YouTube Vlog at:

https://youtu.be/jmVBqYzFNHo

Enjoy! ( )
  booklover3258 | Aug 29, 2022 |
Persepolis is a memoir about Marjane Satrapi’s life since her childhood until her adulthood. The first half is about her childhood in Tehran, Iran, and addresses the Islamic Revolution and the devastating effects of war with Iraq. The second half is about her teenage and young adult years and addresses mostly the struggles of adult life and of being an immigrant.

This graphic novel was very informative, emotional and occasionally funny. I like how the author kept to the most important events in her life and didn’t omit her flaws. If I have one complain is that some words are outdated. This was a very educational and insightful read. ( )
  elderlingfae | Aug 11, 2022 |
I came back to this book after reading it in my ninth grade English class. It was just as heart-breaking and impactful as I remembered it to be. Such an insightful and honest look into the life of a young woman growing up in a war zone. The most impactful part of the story comes from the illustrations. They so accurately depict the mood and simplicity of life.
  Mom_of_Moriarty | Jul 27, 2022 |
Wonderful comic book, reminiscent of Maus and the Hernandez brothers work in its honesty, humanity and stark, simple visual style. ( )
  whatmeworry | Apr 9, 2022 |
This graphic memoir tells the story of the artists’ childhood in Iran starting just before the 1979 revolution, when Marjane was 10, to her departure from Iran at age 14 to study in Vienna. Marjane’s parents allowed her as much freedom as they could, and she felt empowered to stand up for her beliefs. As a 10-year-old, she was reading comics about dialectical materialism, with conversations between Descartes and Marx. She bonded with her uncle, who had been a political prisoner for his communist beliefs. She also loved pop culture like jeans, makeup, and pop music (Iron Maiden and Kim Wilde were favorites). These pleasures provided an outlet from the constant threat of bombs from the Iran/Iraq war and from the revolutionary government and its strict enforcement of Islamic behavior, which for women meant being properly veiled, among other things.

The Iranian revolution and the hostage crisis were a part of my teenage years. My knowledge of these events mostly comes from the daily news broadcasts as the events unfolded. It was interesting to view these events from an insider’s perspective. The bold black and white illustrations perfectly suit the story Satrapi tells. Recommended. ( )
  cbl_tn | Apr 2, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 297 (next | show all)
Satrapi’s style is almost primitive, consisting of flat figures with simple shapes and features. It’s more sophisticated than a child’s creations, but it superficially resembles them, an approach that supports the presentation of memories from that period of life.
 
Marjane Satrapi's ''Persepolis'' is the latest and one of the most delectable examples of a booming postmodern genre: autobiography by comic book.
 

» Add other authors (16 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Satrapi, Marjaneprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Aarne, TainaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Deluze, EveLetteringsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ferris, BlakeTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gasparini, GianluigiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Merrien, CelineAdditional hand letteringsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ripa, MattiasTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sparagana, CristinaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Dedication
To my parents
First words
This is me when I was 10 years old. This was in 1980.
Quotations
EXCEPT FOR MY GRANDMOTHER I WAS OBVIOUSLY THE ONLY ONE WHO BELIEVED IN MYSELF.
IT WAS FUNNY TO SEE HOW MUCH MARX AND GOD LOOKED LIKE EACH OTHER. THOUGH MARX'S HAIR WAS A BIT CURLIER.
TO EACH HIS OWN WAY OF CALMING DOWN.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Persepolis was originally published in 4 volumes. Some later editions, especially in the U.S., combined volumes 1-2 into one work Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood; volumes 3-4 were combined into Persepolis: The Story of a Return. Keep this in mind when combining/separating.
Please determine if your item is a videorecording of the film adaptation Persepolis, a copy of the first of four Persepolis graphic novels published in France, a copy of the English edition Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood, or a copy of the Complete Persepolis. Then please separate it and combine it with the appropriate item.
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An intelligent and outspoken only child, Satrapi--the daughter of radical Marxists and the great-granddaughter of Iran's last emperor--bears witness to a childhood uniquely entwined with the history of her country. Originally published to wide critical acclaim in France, where it elicited comparisons to Art Spiegelman's Maus, Persepolis is Marjane Satrapi's wise, funny, and heartbreaking memoir of growing up in Iran during the Islamic Revolution. In powerful black-and-white comic strip images, Satrapi tells the story of her life in Tehran from ages six to fourteen, years that saw the overthrow of the Shah's regime, the triumph of the Islamic Revolution, and the devastating effects of war with Iraq. The intelligent and outspoken only child of committed Marxists and the great-granddaughter of one of Iran's last emperors, Marjane bears witness to a childhood uniquely entwined with the history of her country. Persepolis paints an unforgettable portrait of daily life in Iran: of the bewildering contradictions between home life and public life and of the enormous toll repressive regimes exact on the individual spirit. Marjane's child's-eye-view of dethroned emperors, state-sanctioned whippings, and heroes of the revolution allows us to learn as she does the history of this fascinating country and of her own extraordinary family. Intensely personal, profoundly political, and wholly original, Persepolis is at once a story of growing up and a stunning reminder of the human cost of war and political repression. It shows how we carry on, through laughter and tears, in the face of absurdity. And, finally, it introduces us to an irresistible little girl with whom we cannot help but fall in love.

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Book description
Originally published to wide critical acclaim in France, where it elicited comparisons to Art Spiegelman's Maus, Persepolis is Marjane Satrapi's wise, funny, and heartbreaking memoir of growing up in Iran during the Islamic Revolution. In powerful black-and-white comic strip images, Satrapi tells the story of her life in Tehran from ages six to fourteen, years that saw the overthrow of the Shah's regime, the triumph of the Islamic Revolution, and the devastating effects of war with Iraq. The intelligent and outspoken only child of committed Marxists and the great-granddaughter of one of Iran's last emperors, Marjane bears witness to a childhood uniquely entwined with the history of her country.

Persepolis paints an unforgettable portrait of daily life in Iran: of the bewildering contradictions between home life and public life and of the enormous toll repressive regimes exact on the individual spirit. Marjane's child's-eye-view of dethroned emperors, state-sanctioned whippings, and heroes of the revolution allows us to learn as she does the history of this fascinating country and of her own extraordinary family. Intensely personal, profoundly political, and wholly original, Persepolis is at once a story of growing up and a stunning reminder of the human cost of war and political repression. It shows how we carry on, through laughter and tears, in the face of absurdity. And, finally, it introduces us to an irresistible little girl with whom we cannot help but fall in love.
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