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Hatchepsut: The Female Pharaoh by Joyce A.…
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Hatchepsut: The Female Pharaoh

by Joyce A. Tyldesley

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Egypt's Queen--or, as she would prefer to be remembered, King--Hatchepsut ruled over an age of peace, prosperity, and remarkable architectural achievement (c. 1490 b.c.). Had she been born a man, her reign would almost certainly have been remembered for its stable government, successful trade missions, and the construction of one of the most beautiful structures in the world--the Deir el-Bahri temple at Luxor. After her death, however, her name and... ( )
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  Tutter | Feb 18, 2015 |
Ancient Egypt is another passion of mine. I'm thrilled to get a chance to read this book about "His Majesty Herself." Hatchepsut (or "Hats and Shoes" as she was called in a very funny 19th century mystery) was quite a historical figure and character.

I enjoyed this book thoroughly and read it at one sitting! It's quite a page turner. I found some of the authors conclusions to be rather quick given the spotty historical record of that time period but there is pleanty of citations and a lengthy bibliography for further reading. ( )
1 vote pussreboots | Aug 16, 2014 |
Although I learned much about the female King, Hatchepsut, I often found this book to be a little to slow at times. Therefore, it was difficult to maintain my interest in it. Hatchepsut was the daughter of King Tuthmosis I, the sister and wife of Tuthmosis II, and the stepmother and mother-in-law of Tuthmosis III. Because her stepson was young when Tuthmosis II died, she acted as regent for her stepson. She took on the role of King and tried to validate her position by linking herself to the gods. She even went so far as to wear a false beard to make herself resemble a man. She seems to have done a fair job of maintaining her position for some time, but eventually her stepson took over the role of King. For unknown reasons, someone tried to erase the memory of her role of King by defacing most of the statues and writing in which she appeared. Joyce Tyldesley pointed out that there were some other women who held the reigns of power in Egypt, but Hatchepsut seems to be the only one of which someone tried to erase her history. Whether that was her stepson or not, seems to be unclear. ( )
  gcamp | Sep 2, 2011 |
The author's excellent work on the daily life of ancient Egyptian women piqued my interest in her biography of this queen (more usually spelled Hatshepsut) who ruled as a King. I was not disappointed - though it has the hallmarks of a scholarly work, and the narrative flags from time to time, it was overall a quite entertaining story about a woman who was omitted from the Kings List for reasons still unknown. Tyldesley thoroughly debunks the notion that Hatshepsut's younger brother, who ruled after her, wiped her name from her temples and public works in a jealous rage. ( )
  KarenIrelandPhillips | Mar 31, 2011 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0140244646, Paperback)

Egypt?s Queen?or, as she would prefer to be remembered, King?Hatchepsut ruled over an age of peace, prosperity, and remarkable architectural achievement (c. 1490 b.c.). Had she been born a man, her reign would almost certainly have been remembered for its stable government, successful trade missions, and the construction of one of the most beautiful structures in the world?the Deir el-Bahri temple at Luxor. After her death, however, her name and image were viciously attacked, her monuments destroyed or usurped, her place in history systematically obliterated. At last, in this dazzling work of archaeological and historical sleuthing, Joyce Tyldesley rescues this intriguing figure from more than two thousand years of oblivion and finally restores the female pharaoh to her rightful prominence as the first woman in recorded history to rule a nation.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:20:13 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

Queen--or, as she would prefer to be remembered, King--Hatchepsut was a remarkable woman. Born the eldest daughter of King Tuthmosis I, married to her half-brother Tuthmosis II, and guardian of her young stepson-nephew Tuthmosis III, Hatchepsut, the Female Pharaoh, brilliantly defied tradition and established herself on the divine throne of the pharaohs to become the female embodiment of a man, dressing in male clothing and even sporting the pharaoh's traditional false beard. Her reign was a carefully balanced period of internal peace, foreign exploration and monumental building, and Egypt prospered under her rule. After her death, however, a serious attempt was made to obliterate Hatchepsut's memory from the history of Egypt. Her monuments were either destroyed or usurped, her portraits were vandalized and, for over two thousand years, her name was forgotten. The political climate leading to Hatchepsut's unprecedented assumption of power and the principal achievements of her reign are considered in detail, and the vicious attacks on Hatchepsut's name and image are explored in full. By combining archaeological and historical evidence from a wide range of sources, Joyce Tyldesley provides the reader with an intriguing insight into life within the claustrophobic Theban royal family in early 18th Dynasty Egypt. At last, the Female Pharaoh is restored.--Publisher description.… (more)

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Penguin Australia

An edition of this book was published by Penguin Australia.

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