HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Trilogy

by H.D.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
372659,733 (3.93)4
As civilian war poetry (written under the shattering impact of World War II). Trilogy's three long poems rank with T.S. Eliot's "Four Quartets" and Ezra Pound's "Pisan Cantos." The first book of the Trilogy, "The Walls Do Not Fall," published in the midst of the "fifty thousand incidents" of the London blitz, maintains the hope that though "we have no map; / possibly we will reach haven,/ heaven." "Tribute to Angels" describes new life springing from the ruins, and finally, in "The Flowering of the Rod"—with its epigram "...pause to give/ thanks that we rise again from death and live."—faith in love and resurrection is realized in lyric and strongly Biblical imagery.… (more)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 4 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
Depth of the sub-conscious spews forth
too many incongruent monsters


The day is quadrant of agonizing beauty. Damage was inflicted last night. Self care was errant. But the day has bounded with joy. So strange then to immerse in the gilded pain of H.D. While I was out walking I considered easily disparate natures of this triptych and how "incongruent monsters " found a harmony in my aching head.

I think I will wait on her Helen. The cicadas are a sufficient charm at present. I can reach for her fear but it remains imprinted, folded. ( )
  jonfaith | Feb 22, 2019 |
Trilogy is a compilation of three of H.D.'s major works: The Walls Do Not Fall; Tribute to the Angels; The Flowering of the Rood.

The Walls Do Not Fall reflects on H.D's experience of witnessing the bombings of London during WWII and surviving those bombings. Through this poem, H.D. is trying to connect the bombings in London with her history--her personal history as a woman as well as her personal history as a poet in addition to connecting it to History as well. As with much of H.D.'s poetry, this poem is tinged with her search for her voice in, particularly at the time she was writing, a male dominated world.

Tribute to the Angels connects to The Walls Do Not Fall in that it is an exploration of his-story in ancient and Biblical times. The poem is H.D.'s search for herself, her voice, and her salvation.

The Flowering of the Rood is both a creation story, a crucifixion story, and a resurrection story, but it focuses principle on Mary Magdalene and her "salvation" and "resurrection"--a resurrection of the self.

H.D.'s work is always a fascinating exploration of language and words, especially the multiple meanings of language. Potential readers of this text will fine it much more approachable if they, themselves, are fairly knowledgeable in the areas of mythology, ancient history, and biblical history. ( )
  slpwhitehead | Jan 17, 2016 |
Trilogy is a compilation of three of H.D.'s major works: The Walls Do Not Fall; Tribute to the Angels; The Flowering of the Rood.

The Walls Do Not Fall reflects on H.D's experience of witnessing the bombings of London during WWII and surviving those bombings. Through this poem, H.D. is trying to connect the bombings in London with her history--her personal history as a woman as well as her personal history as a poet in addition to connecting it to History as well. As with much of H.D.'s poetry, this poem is tinged with her search for her voice in, particularly at the time she was writing, a male dominated world.

Tribute to the Angels connects to The Walls Do Not Fall in that it is an exploration of his-story in ancient and Biblical times. The poem is H.D.'s search for herself, her voice, and her salvation.

The Flowering of the Rood is both a creation story, a crucifixion story, and a resurrection story, but it focuses principle on Mary Magdalene and her "salvation" and "resurrection"--a resurrection of the self.

H.D.'s work is always a fascinating exploration of language and words, especially the multiple meanings of language. Potential readers of this text will fine it much more approachable if they, themselves, are fairly knowledgeable in the areas of mythology, ancient history, and biblical history. ( )
  slpwhitehead | Jan 16, 2016 |
Takes a while to 'hear' what she's up to, but when you get the hang of the fact that she uses time in very long blocks ('cosmic' time rather than single-human time) things start to chime. ( )
  motleystu | Sep 7, 2013 |
Of all of H.D.'s work, next to Notes on Thought and Vision (which proves a good key or legend to understanding Trilogy) this is my favorite and I suspect her most important epic poem (though I am fond of Helen in Egypt and Hermetic Definitiontoo).Trilogy consists of three books: These Walls Do Not Fall; Tribute to the Angels; and The Flowering of the Rod. Each of these divisions is made up of 43 parts or poems, the poems divided only by the number they bear, the 43 adding up to the mystical number 7. Mystical numbers and allusions abound here, just like the three books of Trilogy allude to the Trinity. The three books were written during World War II and the London blitz which seems to have triggered a psychic breakdown or trauma that enabled H.D.'s intense and intricate vision captured here, a vision that speaks to a new world H.D. envisioned as inevitable after the mass destruction and horror of the war.These Walls Do Not Fall is the earliest of the three books, written during the air raids and battles over London in 1942. H.D. lived in London at this time, the stress and destruction of the bombings present in the poetry. Poem 1 opens with “An incident here and there, / and rails gone (for guns) / from your (and my) old town square” (1:1-3). The incidents refer to the air battles over London, transportation impossible as the rails have been torn up to make guns, while the repetition of here and there, or there and here in the poems, “there, as here, ruin opens / the tomb, the temple; enter, / there as here, there are no doors:” (1:10-12) relates London to the ancient city of Karnak as H.D.’s epigraph reveals: "for Karnak 1923 from / London 1942." H.D. visited Karnak in 1923, and likens the ruins she saw to the ruins of the London she lives in. This conflation of space opens, in a way that’s akin to invoking a muse, a creative space of imaginative and mythic potential: the shrine lies open to the sky, the rain falls, here, there sand drifts; eternity endures: (1:13-15)Stranded in London, the old town squares gone, inaccessible, these modern day ruins become a shrine, like the ruined temple at Karnak, its roof, and thus boundaries, gone. In London, rain falls through the opened roof space, while in Egypt sand drifts through a similar space. H.D. follows this comparison with the phrase “eternity endures,” showing how ruins persist: as in Karnak so in London. Also, since the phrase is followed by a colon, the next stanza seems to be an example of enduring eternity: ruin everywhere, yet as the fallen roof leaves the sealed room open to the air, so through our desolation, thoughts stir, inspiration stalks us through gloom: (1:16-21)As the ruins lie open to the sky, so do H.D.’s thoughts, the ruins inspiring her to ascend through the opened space, to reach new imaginative heights.Poem 1 not only sets the historic scene and impetus for H.D.’s project, but also serves as an introduction to the book itself. H.D. marvels at how “the bone-frame was made for / no such shock knit within terror, / yet the skeleton stood up to it:” (1:43-45) referring to the incessant bombing of the Germans on a literal, physical level locating the trauma within her body and yet how it endures. She moves to the metaphor in the next stanza: “the flesh? it was melted away, / the heart burnt out, dead ember, / tendons, muscles shattered, outer husk dismembered,” (1:46-48) painting a graphic picture of the body consumed and destroyed, which metaphorically speaks to a necessary death, a burning away of the layers to get back at the skeleton, at the framework: “yet the frame held: / we passed the flame: we wonder / what saved us? what for?” (1:49-51). This first poem ends with these important questions, questions that allow the creation of the poems that are to follow, poems that will demand answers through their very process of being written. H.D. will find whatever “Presence” or “Spirit” saved her, and in finding the benefactor, learn why she was saved, for what purpose she was spared. These questions also keep the reader reading, to find out what spirit or being spared H.D. and her companions as they hid out in shelters. It also poses the “what for?” question, which would speak to the skeletal frame that remains. H.D.’s project is to create a new religion, one stripped of its recent history and baggage. She seeks to return to the beginning of all myths, and marry them by finding or forcing connections between their stories.For instance, H.D. has a tendency to conflate mythologies and god figures, such as the Egyptian Amen and the Christian Christ. In poem 18 she writes: “The Christos-image / is most difficult to disentangle // from its art-craft junk-shop / paint-and-plaster medieval jumble // of pain-worship and death-symbol,” (18:1-5) referring obviously to the Christian, or more appropriately Roman Catholic cult of pain and death that surrounds Christ. The “art-craft junk-shop” refers to the iconography and religious art that has arisen through the ages, especially frescoes, the “paint-and-plaster medieval jumble.” She disentangles this Christ image to conflate him with Amen, the Egyptian Sun God: “for now it appears obvious / that Amen is our Christos” (18:11-12). H.D. writes, in language reminiscent of the Bible, “let us light a new fire / and in the fragrance // of burnt salt and sea-incense / chant new paeans to the new Sun” (17:11-14) the “sun” a pun on both Sun and Son. The new Sun is “of regeneration;” the territory of the Egyptian God Amen: “we have always worshipped Him, / we have always said, / forever and ever, Amen” (17:16-18). H.D. takes the Christian ending to a prayer “amen” and raises it to the level of a God’s name from another culture, Amen. The endnotes by Barnstone remind us how “Amen is a variation in name of Amon or Ammon. Amon’s most important shrine was the Temple of Amon at Luxor in ancient Thebes” (Reader’s Notes 179). The temple-city of Luxor is at Karnak, housing the Temple of Amon or Amen. Amen is also associated with Ra, the Egyptian Sun God, who is Apollo in the Greek pantheon, patron of poets and art. The move on H.D.’s part is to create a God of the Arts, the “mage” as she calls him, who later reveals himself as Kaspar in The Flowering of the Rod, and as Christ and Venus in Tribute to the Angels.The key word to understand this conflation project is “palimpsest”, a word she uses throughout These Walls Do Not Fall which signifies an ancient manuscript of parchment or papyrus which was written over more than once, the earlier writing still legible beneath the new writing. H.D. writes in section 31, “jottings on a margin, / indecipherable palimpsest scribbled over” (31:3-4) which perfectly describes how her new words incorporate the words of ancient texts. Yet she also uses this word in an imagined accusation against her project: “how can you scratch out // indelible ink of the palimpsest / of past misadventure?” (2:26-28). The accusation seems to come from within her as she doubts her project, though textually it comes in the form of the “they” that haunts these poems as the audience of her project. Since the ink is indelible or unable to be erased, the question is, how in good faith can she scratch out as a form of erasure? And what words on the palimpsest is she scratching out? The words written over the original by those who have misinterpreted the original meaning, the interpretations of “past misadventure”? Or the original words themselves? In would seem the former, the misinterpretations, though her project is in the same interpretative vein as she writes new words over the originals, her additions seeking to also add new meaning.I always have more to say about H.D. and this book (in particular where Notes on Thought and Vision intersects with this project), but on a personal note I've always found the book in many ways a Christmas poem, especially the last section The Flowering of the Rod, as it was written during December 18-31 in 1944. This section uses the language of the Nativity and of the Three Magi, or wise men, especially Kaspar, in its vision of poetry’s power for the future (the poet as secret initiate, the chosen prophet to destroy the old gods and make way for the new god of art, of poetry, the Mage, Amen). It is the most “Christian” of the three books, with Tribute to the Angels coming in second as a Spring poem, and thus heavily involved with rebirth as it was composed in the last days of May (17-31) in 1944. Tribute to the Angels is shorter in length, though still made up of the requisite 43 poems, and is probably the most difficult of the three books to decipher in its use of the book of Revelation to speak of seven angelic figures as they conflate with gods and goddesses from other cultures.But the reason I call it a Christmas poem stems from a strong affinity that I can only explain as the shared rooted-ness of also having been born and raised in Bethlehem, PA. I must confess I have read Trilogy every year on Christmas Eve for the past five years now when I am at home visiting my parents in the Christmas City. ( )
  MatthewHittinger | Dec 29, 2008 |
Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

As civilian war poetry (written under the shattering impact of World War II). Trilogy's three long poems rank with T.S. Eliot's "Four Quartets" and Ezra Pound's "Pisan Cantos." The first book of the Trilogy, "The Walls Do Not Fall," published in the midst of the "fifty thousand incidents" of the London blitz, maintains the hope that though "we have no map; / possibly we will reach haven,/ heaven." "Tribute to Angels" describes new life springing from the ruins, and finally, in "The Flowering of the Rod"—with its epigram "...pause to give/ thanks that we rise again from death and live."—faith in love and resurrection is realized in lyric and strongly Biblical imagery.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Legacy Library: H.D.

H.D. has a Legacy Library. Legacy libraries are the personal libraries of famous readers, entered by LibraryThing members from the Legacy Libraries group.

See H.D.'s legacy profile.

See H.D.'s author page.

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.93)
0.5
1
1.5 1
2 2
2.5 1
3 10
3.5 1
4 20
4.5
5 15

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 180,187,400 books! | Top bar: Always visible