HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Killing of the Tinkers by Ken Bruen
Loading...

The Killing of the Tinkers (2002)

by Ken Bruen

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3801442,137 (3.67)94

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 94 mentions

English (12)  Spanish (1)  French (1)  All languages (14)
Showing 1-5 of 12 (next | show all)
Slightly less coherent than the first Jack Taylor with some genuinely bizarre choices. Bruen gives generous shout outs to other writers that he admires name-checking McBain and Lawrence Block and nodding to George Pelecanos at least 3 different times in the book. Oddly, though, every time he mentions Pelecanos, he spells it differently. This is not one of the characters spelling it badly, its the narrator. This may well be the worst edited book i have ever read. In many ways it feels completely unproofed and similar to a self-published manuscript. Weird.

There are huge inconsistencies and leaps of logic and an ending that is supposed to be nihilistic, but is just bonkers. I can almost forgive the whole affair for giving me suggestions for other books to read and for quoting chunks out of things like Chandler's Simple Act of Murder, but this one has me worried. I'll give Bruen another chance, but if that's as poorly presented as this, I'm done. ( )
  asxz | Mar 13, 2019 |



“The Killing of the Tinkers” is a lonely book.

I used to read a fair amount of crime fiction. A lot, actually. In the last years I've found myself reading less of it, and in the last years I find that the novels I give up on the soonest are crime novels. Why? Well. For several reasons. For starters the term "noir" is being used today as something of a buzzword. It’s used with the same promiscuity as the snack food industry uses ketchup. I’ve lost count on the number of books I’ve given up on because of that. I don’t want to read an author that just likes to play a noir game. I want an author that really pays attention to reality and logic. Ken Bruen is one of the happy few that despite a few wobbles, and missteps, has been able to avoid tumbling into oblivion (I’m still reading the early Bruen. I’m still withholding judgment on the late Bruen).

After having a taste of Jack Taylor in "The Guards", I was ready for some more. Ken Bruen has a noir writing style that perfectly captures the flavour of the local underground in which the characters live, including the drugs that often exist but are rarely written about in mainstream fiction. Ken Bruen is stylistically in a class of his own. Right from the first page, Bruen hits a faultless noir mood and doesn’t let go until the very last page. The book is full of despair and it takes a special author to be able to find something beautiful and honest in such unrelenting despair, and Bruen is the guy to do it.

If Jack Taylor is your run-of-the-mill detective, what isn’t definitely standard, is Bruen's prose. Not only are you hammered on the head with the Queen’s English, but Bruen has a unique writing style in which he sometimes uses poetry that fits the prose pitch-perfect, even in the middle of a paragraph, or when using a list. Raw poetical prose at its finest.

“The Killing of the Tinkers” isn’t overly concerned with detailing the detection process, and the mysteries are actually easily solved, but that's beside the point. Noir is all-pervasive throughout the book. And maybe that’s why Jack Taylor drinks so much, maybe to stop himself from seeing, not only the worst parts of the world around him, but also himself.

As I said in another review, Bruen is an acquired taste.
" ( )
  antao | Dec 10, 2016 |
Ken Bruen is an author of few words. His Jack Taylor books are short, succinct and directly to the point, and let me tell you, a lot happens in between the covers of his books. Jack Taylor is my new favourite anti-hero. He's a hard drinking, hard-scrabble and surprisingly literary PI who lives in Galway, Ireland. This is the second book in the series and Jack is coming back to Galway after a year in London. He left because his life was in a real mess and he had many people after his blood. He comes back to Galway still a raging alcoholic but he's also a cocaine addict. His life is a mess and he can't seem to get out of his downward spiral. As he sits in one of his favourite watering holes shortly after returning, a big gypsy walks into the bar and asks Jack for his help. Someone is killing young gypsy men in his clan. Jack comes out of his alcoholic haze and recognizes a man who seems just like himself and he agrees to help. The pace of this book will blow you away and even though it's short we get more than enough characterization and plot to keep a reader wildly turning pages. Jack is a train wreck and he'd be the first to admit it, but he is the most insightful, quick-witted PI you're ever likely to meet. It makes me wonder how spectacular he'd be if he was sober. ( )
  Romonko | Oct 8, 2015 |
Jack Taylor might be a train-wreck, but somehow remains appealing - evident even after a thrashing. As expected in a story involving an alcoholic - and now he's on cocaine too - it can be irreverent, brutal, revolting. But this is Jack Taylor and we can forgive him. The character-driven series is enhanced by Bruen's spare style of writing giving it a poetic quality. It would be a good idea to keep pencil and paper handy to make notes about Taylor's reading and music choices. I enjoyed this a lot and look forward to following the series. ( )
1 vote VivienneR | Jul 1, 2015 |
I did not particularly enjoy this book. The plot was rather unremarkable and the whole thing played out like paint-by-numbers noir. ( )
  ktp50 | Mar 27, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 12 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Es führt kein Weg zurück

Thomas Wolfe
Dedication
Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Für Cathi Unsworth
First words
Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Der Bub ist wieder in der Stadt.
Quotations
Last words
Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0312339283, Paperback)

When Jack Taylor blew town at the end of The Guards his alcoholism was a distant memory and sober dreams of a new life in London were shining in his eyes. In the opening pages of The Killing of the Tinkers, Jack's back in Galway a year later with a new leather jacket on his back, a pack of smokes in his pocket, a few grams of coke in his waistband, and a pint of Guinness on his mind. So much for new beginnings.

Before long he's sunk into his old patterns, lifting his head from the bar only every few days, appraising his surroundings for mere minutes and then descending deep into the alcoholic, drug-induced fugue he prefers to the real world. But a big gypsy walks into the bar one day during a moment of Jack's clarity and changes all that with a simple request. Jack knows the look in this man's eyes, a look of hopelessness mixed with resolve topped off with a quietly simmering rage; he's seen it in the mirror. Recognizing a kindred soul, Jack agrees to help him, knowing but not admitting that getting involved is going to lead to more bad than good. But in Jack Taylor's world bad and good are part and parcel of the same lost cause, and besides, no one ever accused Jack of having good sense.

Ken Bruen wowed critics and readers alike when he introduced Jack Taylor in The Guards; he'll blow them away with The Killing of the Tinkers, a novel of gritty brilliance that cements Bruen's place among the greats of modern crime fiction.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:10:53 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

"When Jack Taylor blew town at the end of The Guards, his alcoholism was a distant memory and sober dreams of a new life in London were shining in his eyes. In the opening pages of The Killing of the Tinkers, Jack's back in Galway a year later with a new leather jacket on his back, a pack of smokes in his pocket, a few grams of coke in his waistband, and a pint of Guinness on his mind. So much for new beginnings." "Before long he's sunk into his old patterns, lifting his head from the bar only every few days, appraising his surroundings for mere minutes, and then descending deep into the alcoholic, drug-induced fugue he prefers to the real world. But a big gypsy walks into the bar one day during a moment of Jack's clarity and changes all that with a simple request. Jack knows the look in this man's eyes, a look of hopelessness mixed with resolve topped off with a quietly simmering rage; he's seen it in the mirror. Recognizing a kindred soul, Jack agrees to help him, knowing but not admitting that getting involved is going to lead to more bad than good. But in Jack Taylor's world, bad and good are part and parcel of the same lost cause, and besides, no one ever accused Jack of having good sense."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

» see all 4 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.67)
0.5 1
1 3
1.5
2 11
2.5 4
3 21
3.5 17
4 54
4.5 11
5 18

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 133,556,694 books! | Top bar: Always visible