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Fugitives and Refugees: A Walk in Portland,…
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Fugitives and Refugees: A Walk in Portland, Oregon (2003)

by Chuck Palahniuk

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Showing 1-5 of 15 (next | show all)
This was...ok. Its a book about Portland, giving his insider's view of it and it is interspersed with little memoir postcards. The memoir parts of it were good, very entertaining and a little twisted. I enjoyed them. However, they were slightly fleeting. The rest of the book reads way too much like your average tourist guide, no matter the "alternative" view of Portland he gives. It was interesting to read, and funny in places, but I thought he'd have put a little more creative spin on things. It kind of felt like a quickly tossed together thing to feed the flames of Palahnuik fandom. But I still think he's a really good writer. ( )
  SadieBabie | Jun 23, 2018 |
[a: Chuck Palahniuk|2546|Chuck Palahniuk|https://d.gr-assets.com/authors/1391203076p2/2546.jpg] seems much better suited to this non-fiction writing than his usual books. In [b: Fugitives and Refugees|22289|Fugitives and Refugees A Walk in Portland, Oregon|Chuck Palahniuk|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1429316063s/22289.jpg|141049] he manages to convey the heart and strange soul of Portland in a very human way. The oddities that he mentions he does so with a humble love and wry smirk that is difficult to not find utterly endearing. It made me want to visit Portland rather badly, though I unfortunately didn't quite have a chance.

The section on Santa Clause is particularly memorable. As is, always, the myriad of strange societies he seems to have taken part in. ( )
  Lepophagus | Jun 14, 2018 |
3.5, teetering towards a 4, out of 5. I've read enough interviews with Palahniuk and seen him enough times now to know one refrain of his perfectly: he wants to capture moments. That's his driving force, as a writer: to capture a moment for posterity. Maybe it's a perfect sentence, maybe it's a place he loves, maybe it's a person he knows or an anecdote they told. And that's what he does here, in an unadorned and beautiful way. Yes, this is a travel guide - but it's also a reflection on a time and a place and a man. Portland has changed a whole lot in the 10 years since this book came out and I'll bet it'll change more before I go back again... but it gave us the man who wrote all these wacky books. This was his chance to give a little something back.

More at RB: ( )
  drewsof | Sep 30, 2015 |
3.5, teetering towards a 4, out of 5. I've read enough interviews with Palahniuk and seen him enough times now to know one refrain of his perfectly: he wants to capture moments. That's his driving force, as a writer: to capture a moment for posterity. Maybe it's a perfect sentence, maybe it's a place he loves, maybe it's a person he knows or an anecdote they told. And that's what he does here, in an unadorned and beautiful way. Yes, this is a travel guide - but it's also a reflection on a time and a place and a man. Portland has changed a whole lot in the 10 years since this book came out and I'll bet it'll change more before I go back again... but it gave us the man who wrote all these wacky books. This was his chance to give a little something back.

More at RB: ( )
  drewsof | Sep 30, 2015 |
On a recent trip to Portland, Oregon (that eternal rival for Minneapolis’ title of “most bike friendly city”), I found that Fugitives and Refugees, Chuck Palahniuk's autobiographical travel guide to the iconic Pacific Northwest city was an invaluable companion to my visit. Describing the towns various quirks; the Voodoo Doughnuts, Shanghai Tunnels, and Powell’s City of Books (all of which I, tourist that I am, had to experience on my stopover), Palahniuk’s essays present a lot more than a mere travel guide. In spite of being more than a decade old at this point, Palahniuk’s personal tour through a few of the odder denizens and locations in a very odd city paints a vivid and affectionate portrait of the history and background of Portland, both in the grand scheme and in Palahniuk’s personal relationship with the city. Exploring the city’s seedy underbelly of sex shows and hauntings, Palahniuk’s ties his own experiences deeply into the culture of Portland through various “postcards” written from different periods of his life there.

Particularly useful was the glossary and list of slang and pronunciations so the visitor can blend in with the locals. In the years since this book has been written, as indicated the presence of the tv series Portlandia, Portland continued to rise in prominence as a home for America’s “fugitives and refugees” (as Palahniuk attributes to Geek Love and Portland-dweller Katherine Dunn) and as an urban renaissance “city that works. It is interesting to see in Palahniuk’s account the very beginnings of this growth of Portland as a city “young people go to retire,” a place more than just a grungy small Pacific Northwest town filled with weirdos, but as a poster city for such a movement. Portland, I must say, is on my short list of American cities were I ever to leave Minnesota, and Fugitives and Refugees, I feel, presents a thought provoking background. ( )
  Spoonbridge | Aug 27, 2014 |
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For my grandmother, Ruth Tallent 1920-2002
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"Everyone in Portland is living a minimum of three lives," says Katherine Dunn, the author of Geek Love.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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The author takes readers on a walking tour of Portland, Oregon, revealing the city's quirky, cheap, and wild side as he visits unusual museums, offbeat annual festivals, scenes of ghostly hauntings, and strange local customs.

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