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Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1962)

by Edward Albee

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
4,094592,227 (4.01)147
George, a disillusioned academic, and Martha, his caustic wife, have just come home from a faculty party. When a handsome young professor and his mousy wife stop by for a nightcap, an innocent night of fun and games quickly turns dark and dangerous. Long-buried resentment and rage are unleashed as George and Martha turn their rapier-sharp wits against each other, using their guests as pawns in their verbal sparring. By night's end, the secrets of both couples are uncovered and the lies they cling to are exposed. Considered by many to be Albee's masterpiece, "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" is a "brilliantly original work of art -- an excoriating theatrical experience, surging with shocks of recognition and dramatic fire" ("Newsweek").… (more)
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» See also 147 mentions

English (54)  Dutch (1)  Portuguese (1)  Italian (1)  German (1)  Spanish (1)  All languages (59)
Showing 1-5 of 54 (next | show all)
Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? by Edward Albee (1983)
  arosoff | Jul 10, 2021 |
‘'tis the refuge we take when the unreality of the world weighs too heavy on our tiny heads"

Libera me, Domine, de morte aeterna, in die illa tremenda 
Quando cœli movendi sunt et terra
 Dum veneris iudicare saeculum per ignem.

Tremens factus sum ego, et timeo, dum discussio venerit, atque ventura ira
Quando cœli movendi sunt et terra.

Dies illa, dies irae, calamitatis et miseriæ, dies magna et amara valde
Dum veneris iudicare saeculum per ignem.

Requiem aeternam dona eis, Domine: et lux perpetua luceat eis.

Latin for 'brilliant masterpiece'





( )
  mortalfool | Jul 10, 2021 |
a couple set on mutual destruction with unwilling witnesses
  ritaer | Jun 6, 2021 |
Note: Avoid the Signet version, or any other revised for Broadway edition, as it removes from the end of Act 2 a part that pretty much all the bigwigs think of as a key scene. ( )
  irrelephant | Feb 21, 2021 |
I read this play in one sitting, which is not a difficult task, as it isn’t a long book. There are just four characters, and it takes place in real time – both of these points appealed to me.

George and Martha are a middle aged couple who live on a New England university campus. George is a history lecturer and Martha is the Dean’s daughter. Although they have been married for years, and seem like they would be lost without each other, they also despise each other and both take pleasure in taunting the other.

Things take a sinister turn – although you suspect not for the first time – when a young Biology lecturer named Nick, who is new to the university visits them after a party one night, bringing his naive wife Honey with him. Nick and Honey become drawn into the older couple’s private war, and become pawns in their game.

In the third act, a secret is revealed about George and Martha which goes some way towards explaining their antagonism towards each other (no spoilers here).

It’s a bleak read, and somewhat dated now. Still, I am glad I read it, and would recommend it, but I actually prefer the film version with excellent performances from Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton. ( )
1 vote Ruth72 | Jan 30, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 54 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (14 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Edward Albeeprimary authorall editionscalculated
Braun, PinkasTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Capriolo, EttoreTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Collo, PaoloIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Reve, Gerard Kornelis van hetTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Set in darkness. Crash against front door. Martha's laughter heard. Front door opens, lights are switched on. Martha enters, followed by George. MARTHA: Jesus...
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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This LT work is the text edition of the play. Please do not combine the book with the movie. Thank you.
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George, a disillusioned academic, and Martha, his caustic wife, have just come home from a faculty party. When a handsome young professor and his mousy wife stop by for a nightcap, an innocent night of fun and games quickly turns dark and dangerous. Long-buried resentment and rage are unleashed as George and Martha turn their rapier-sharp wits against each other, using their guests as pawns in their verbal sparring. By night's end, the secrets of both couples are uncovered and the lies they cling to are exposed. Considered by many to be Albee's masterpiece, "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" is a "brilliantly original work of art -- an excoriating theatrical experience, surging with shocks of recognition and dramatic fire" ("Newsweek").

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George, a disillusioned academic, and Martha, his caustic wife, have just come home from a faculty party. When a handsome young professor and his mousy wife stop by for a nightcap, an innocent night of fun and games quickly turns dark and dangerous. Long-buried resentment and rage are unleashed as George and Martha turn their rapier-sharp wits against each other, using their guests as pawns in their verbal sparring. By night's end, the secrets of both couples are uncovered and the lies they cling to are exposed. Considered by many to be Albee's masterpiece.
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