HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Henry and the Clubhouse (1962)

by Beverly Cleary

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Henry Huggins (5)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,759147,413 (4.04)17
For Henry Huggins and his friends Robert and Murph, a clubhouse is a place where they can do as they please, without being bothered by girls. The sign that says NO GIRLS ALLOWED -- THIS MEANS YOU especially means Ramona Quimby. Lately Ramona has been following Henry on his newspaper route, embarrassing him in front of Henry's customers. The day Ramona follows Henry to the clubhouse, she wants to teach him girls aren't so bad, but she almost puts an end to his newspaper career forever.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 17 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 13 (next | show all)
00001282
  lcslibrarian | Aug 13, 2020 |
00001563
  lcslibrarian | Aug 13, 2020 |
Another lovely book about Henry Huggins. I wish I had read these as a child, they are wonderfully written. Ramona becomes more and more an important character in these stories. Everything Henry tries to do to keep her from bugging him, ends up getting her more involved in his adventures. ( )
  Marse | Mar 11, 2019 |
Henry has trouble balancing his paper route, construction on his clubhouse, and dealing with Ramona the Pest.
Charlie is such a fan of Henry Huggins. I love that he loves these books. ( )
  scaifea | Sep 26, 2017 |
One of our favorite one's. Good old Romana—she manages to be a pest and save the day all at the same time. Henry proves to be a capable newspaper boy, get his clubhouse built, and through a good deed, also manages to get his sleeping bag. More laughs along the way for Rebekah and I. One more book in the series to go—Ribsy—and then we will start the Romana books. ( )
  memlhd | Jan 23, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 13 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (6 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Beverly Clearyprimary authorall editionscalculated
Darling, LouisIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Henry Huggins had a lot of good ideas that fall when he first had his paper route, but somehow his ideas had a way of not turning out as he had planned.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (3)

For Henry Huggins and his friends Robert and Murph, a clubhouse is a place where they can do as they please, without being bothered by girls. The sign that says NO GIRLS ALLOWED -- THIS MEANS YOU especially means Ramona Quimby. Lately Ramona has been following Henry on his newspaper route, embarrassing him in front of Henry's customers. The day Ramona follows Henry to the clubhouse, she wants to teach him girls aren't so bad, but she almost puts an end to his newspaper career forever.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (4.04)
0.5
1
1.5
2 3
2.5
3 10
3.5 7
4 29
4.5 3
5 21

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 162,292,232 books! | Top bar: Always visible