HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Pietr the Latvian (1931)

by Georges Simenon

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Maigret (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,0255017,265 (3.38)117
The first novel which appeared in Georges Simenon's famous Maigret series, in a gripping new translation by David Bellos. Inevitably Maigret was a hostile presence in the Majestic. He constituted a kind of foreign body that the hotel's atmosphere could not assimilate. Not that he looked like a cartoon policeman. He didn't have a moustache and he didn't wear heavy boots. His clothes were well cut and made of fairly light worsted. He shaved every day and looked after his hands. But his frame was proletarian. He was a big, bony man. His firm muscles filled out his jacket and quickly pulled all his trousers out of shape. He had a way of imposing himself just by standing there. His assertive presence had often irked many of his own colleagues. In Simenon's first novel featuring Maigret, the laconic detective is taken from grimy bars to luxury hotels as he traces the true identity of Pietr the Latvian. Penguin is publishing the entire series of Maigret novels in new translations. This novel has been published in previous translations as The Case of Peter the Lettand Maigret and the Enigmatic Lett. 'Compelling, remorseless, brilliant' John Gray 'One of the greatest writers of the twentieth century . . . Simenon was unequalled at making us look inside, though the ability was masked by his brilliance at absorbing us obsessively in his stories' Guardian 'A supreme writer . . . unforgettable vividness' Independent… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 117 mentions

English (36)  French (3)  Dutch (2)  Italian (2)  Spanish (2)  Portuguese (1)  Danish (1)  German (1)  Finnish (1)  All languages (49)
Showing 1-5 of 36 (next | show all)
That didn't impress me much.
Maigret is on the job, and he doesn't want no stinkin' champagne:
"Most people here were in formal attire, but there were also a few foreigners in lounge suits. Maigret waved away a hostess who tried to sit at his table. A bottle of champagne was put in front of him, automatically. There were streamers all about. Puffer balls flew through the air. One landed on maigret's nose, and he glowered at the old lady who'd aimed it at him."

Maigret gets shot at outside the theater/Cafe, but he can't stop now. He gets in a cab and returns to the hotel where pietr and the mortimers are, And where his partner has a stakeout:
"at last he caught sight of the Mortimers' Suiye and beside it, the door of the room where Torrance was to be found. He got to the door, walking slightly crabwise, pushed it open....
He had to try three times over. As soon as he took his hand off his wound, blood spurted out of it at an alarming rate. Finally he took the towel that was lying on the table and wedged it under his waistcoat, which he fastened as tight as he could. The smell in the room made him nauseous.
He lifted one end of the settee with weak arms and swung it around on two of its legs. It was what he expected: Torrance, all crumpled up with his shoulder twisted round as if he had his bones broken to make him fit into a small space...
Torrance with dead! Magrette twisted his lips and clenched his fists. His eyes clouded over and he uttered a terrible oath in the shut and silent room."

Maigret tries to understand how the Latvian can look like two different people:
"maigret was two heads taller than Pietr. They were both facing the mirror, and gazed at each other in that pewter-tinted screen.
The latvian's face began to decompose, starting with his eyes. He snapped his white dry-skinned fingers, then wiped his forehead with his hand. A struggle then slowly began on his face. In the mirror maigret saw now the guest of the majestic, now the face of anna gorskin's tormented lover.
But the second visage didn't emerge in full. It kept getting pushed back by immense muscular effort. Only the eyes of pietr's Russian self stayed stable. He was hanging onto the edge of the counter with his left hand. His body was swaying."

"The Two Pietrs:
Maigret had never seen a man get drunk at such lightning speed. It's true he had also never seen anyone fill a tumbler to the brim with whiskey, knock it back, refill it, knock the second glass back, then do the same a third time before shaking the bottle over his mouth to get the last few drops of 104° proof Spirit down his throat.
The effect was impressive. Pietr went crimson and the next minute he was as white as a sheet, with blotches of red on his cheeks. His lips lost their color. He steadied himself on the low table, staggered about, then said with the detachment of a true drunk:
'this is what you wanted, isn't it?...'
He laughed uncertainly, expressing a whole range of things: fear, irony, bitterness and maybe despair. He tried to hold onto a chair but knocked it over, then wiped his damp brow....
what he was watching was the same transformation he'd seen that morning, but on a scale 10 times, a hundred times greater."
( )
  burritapal | Oct 23, 2022 |
This, the first of 75 Maigret novels, is a strangely unsympathetic introduction to the character that emphasizes his flaws more than his skills as a detective.

It’s written in a minimalist staccato style that gives the prose a constant underlying sense of urgency, even in scenes where not much is happening. Unfortunately that same constant rhythm robs some of the more dramatic elements of their impact.

The plot itself sort of meanders through its twists and turns, and has a somewhat anticlimactic ending.

Not an auspicious start, but I will probably still dip into a couple more Maigrets from later in the run to see how they progress. A insert in the book highlights six titles as Simeon’s “great novels” so I’ll try one of those next. ( )
  gothamajp | Aug 23, 2022 |
Interesting to revisit Inspector Maigret. Read some of these mysteries in college long ago in a mystery literature class. Some of the stereotypes stick out more clearly now. The mystery was a bit hard to follow at times but was quite adequately explained at the end and was all good. The writing style was slightly odd. I don’t know if that was because it’s an 88 year old book or because it’s translated.

All in all I like Maigret. ( )
  Luziadovalongo | Jul 14, 2022 |
An early Maigret, a bit less plausible than the later obes ( )
  ffortsa | Jul 1, 2022 |
Georges Simenon created a series of mystery novels featuring Detective Chief Inspector Maigret of the Paris police. I've read only a few of them, but I'm always on the lookout for more. On the back cover of [Pietr the Latvian], Maigret is described in a passage in the second chapter:

Not that he looked like a cartoon policeman. He didn't have a mustache and he didn't wear heavy boots. His clothes were well cut and made of fairly light worsted. He shaved every day and looked after his hands.
  But his frame was proletarian. He was a big bony man. Iron muscles shaped his jacket sleeves and quickly wore through new trousers.
  He had a way of imposing himself just by standing there. His assertive presence had often irked many of his own colleagues.

Pietr the Latvian was published in 1930, the first Maigret novel. In it, the Inspector and investigators across Europe are seeking an elusive swindler who connects with wealthy sorts, befriends them, then somehow steals, extorts, and/or defrauds them of their riches. As the story begins, Maigret meets a train that traveled from the north into Paris. Methodically he scans the passengers getting off and focuses on a particular well-dressed man who is trailed by a trio of porters. Maigret knows this fellow from detailed descriptions filed by agents in many European cities. Since he knows the fellow's destination, he doesn't follow. But he does respond to an alarm about a dead man found in the toilet of a train carriage. Curiously, the man closely resembles the fugitive. He's been shot in the chest at close range. Miagret takes particular note that the man's shoes are cheaply made and very worn. When uniformed policemen arrive, Maigret instructs them on the disposition of the body, then departs.

The ensuing investigation involves almost endless surveillance of an attractive woman believed to be the Latvian's wife and another woman believed to be a girlfriend, as well as a wealthy couple believed to be the Latvian's current target. By the end, Maigret has literally gotten into bed with his suspect.

You should read it. If you are like me, you'll be hooked. Don't worry. Before his death, Simenon wrote 75 Maigret novels and 28 stories.
  weird_O | Jun 24, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 36 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (4 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Simenon, Georgesprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bellos, DavidTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bruna, DickCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cañameras, F.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jordá, JoaquínTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Marchi, EnaEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mélaouah, YasminaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Monreal, José RamónTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
N. Broes van GroenauTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pinotti, GiorgioEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tlarig, M.Cover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Woodward, DaphneTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Interpol to Sûreté, Paris:
Xuvust Cracovie vimontra m ghks triv psot uv Pietr-le-Letton Breme vs tyz btolem.
Detective Chief Inspector Maigret of the Flying Squad raised his eyes.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
In the French original, Pietr-le-Letton (1931).

Variously published in English as:
(i) The Strange Case of Peter the Lett (1933) (trans. Anthony Abbot);
(ii) "The Case of Peter the Lett," (trans. Anthony Abbot) in Inspector Maigret Investigates (1933);
(iii) Maigret and the Enigmatic Lett (1963), and in Maigret Meets a Milord (1983) (trans. Daphne Woodward) and;
(iv) Pietr the Latvian (2013) (trans. David Bellos).
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

The first novel which appeared in Georges Simenon's famous Maigret series, in a gripping new translation by David Bellos. Inevitably Maigret was a hostile presence in the Majestic. He constituted a kind of foreign body that the hotel's atmosphere could not assimilate. Not that he looked like a cartoon policeman. He didn't have a moustache and he didn't wear heavy boots. His clothes were well cut and made of fairly light worsted. He shaved every day and looked after his hands. But his frame was proletarian. He was a big, bony man. His firm muscles filled out his jacket and quickly pulled all his trousers out of shape. He had a way of imposing himself just by standing there. His assertive presence had often irked many of his own colleagues. In Simenon's first novel featuring Maigret, the laconic detective is taken from grimy bars to luxury hotels as he traces the true identity of Pietr the Latvian. Penguin is publishing the entire series of Maigret novels in new translations. This novel has been published in previous translations as The Case of Peter the Lettand Maigret and the Enigmatic Lett. 'Compelling, remorseless, brilliant' John Gray 'One of the greatest writers of the twentieth century . . . Simenon was unequalled at making us look inside, though the ability was masked by his brilliance at absorbing us obsessively in his stories' Guardian 'A supreme writer . . . unforgettable vividness' Independent

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.38)
0.5
1 6
1.5 1
2 24
2.5 6
3 97
3.5 35
4 61
4.5 3
5 29

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 180,180,739 books! | Top bar: Always visible