HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
Have you checked out SantaThing, LibraryThing's gift-giving tradition?
dismiss
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Between Planets (1951)

by Robert A. Heinlein

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Heinlein Juveniles (5)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,679228,016 (3.59)45
When war threatens to break out between Venus and Earth, a boy with citizenship on both planets, attending school on Earth but whose home is on Mars, finds himself in an awkward situation.
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 45 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 22 (next | show all)
Between Planets
By: Robert A. Heinlein
Narrated by: Andrew Eiden

Don was born in free fall. Not on Earth, or Mars, or Venus. He's mom was born on Venus and his dad from Earth. When the book starts, Don starts on Earth at a school but he has lived on Venus before. He gets a message to get to Mars now! There's a war coming. Venus and the Federation (Earth) were about go at it. The message said to stop and say goodbye to his uncle first. He doesn't have an uncle but his parents have a friend so he assumes it means him.

This is where things get crazy! He gives a ring to Don to bring to his parents. Now, everyone is after him! The war starts and he can't get to Mars but he makes it to Venus. On the way he meets a dragon and saved his life. Comes to find out he is someone very important. He speaks dragon from living on Venus before.

It's an exciting and fun book! A rebellion, friendships, honor, and it has plenty of action! Loved it! Read it as a kid and enjoyed it again now that I'm old! ( )
  MontzaleeW | May 29, 2021 |
A bit of a divergence in the Scribern's Juvenile "series" The martins described here are significantly different than the one's described in the earlier "red planet"

Our protagonist Don is almost ready to graduate from his remote private high school but is summoned away to Mars apparently to avoid a pending war. As a space born with no allegiance to any particular planet it seems best.

On the way to Mars the venetian rebels take over.

Don ends up going to Venus and trying to make ends meet as a dishwasher and falls in love with the girl at the Telegraph shop.

The romance is the best part of this. The Native Venetian dragons are also interesting, but for the most part it is an evil war story. ( )
  fulner | Mar 29, 2021 |
Another delightful Heinlein juvenile. Compulsively readable, picked it up when by 10 year old finished, and then blazed through it. As with much Heinlein, both shallow/light (interplanetary war! talking dragons! lost civilizations!) and surprisingly deep. I can't recall a kids book from the past decade where characters matter-of-factly accept that you need to kill yourself before being captured by the secret police. ( )
  ben_a | Mar 28, 2021 |
This is one of Heinlein's juvenile novels. That said, there's a couple of somewhat more adult portions, so I'd recommend that younger children shouldn't read it. At least not without having some an interesting discussion or two. But, since the main character is a older teenager, it's more aimed towards that age range.

It was written in 1951 and it certainly bears some of the hallmarks of that. Most notably in the fact that there is very little for the women in this novel to do. That said, the main love interest does express an interest in joining the women's corps in the military when the planet is at war, although it comes across as more along the lines as their participation in WWII, than full participation.

It's basically a boy's adventure novel like most of his juveniles (with the exception of [b:Podkayne of Mars|50839|Podkayne of Mars|Robert A. Heinlein|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1309211249s/50839.jpg|2534895] which has a female protagonist). It's a decent novel, and explores themes that he'd revisit in later novels. Here we have a colony world (Venus) rebelling against the Earth regime, very much like [b:The Moon is a Harsh Mistress|16690|The Moon is a Harsh Mistress|Robert A. Heinlein|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1348768309s/16690.jpg|1048525] which had Luna rebelling against Earth.

I think a number of his juveniles perform a useful service in raising issues for young people to consider in a safe environment. It also helps in preparing them for other themes that will arise in his later novels (e.g., [b:Starship Troopers|17214|Starship Troopers|Robert A. Heinlein|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1348024291s/17214.jpg|2534973] which could be misconstrued) as well as themes in more weighty texts.

I listened to the Full-Cast Audio production which is kind of a mix of a book and a radio play. It's the full text of the book, but they use different people to play (i.e., read) the individual parts, along with the main narrator. I've quite liked their productions of Heinlein juveniles in the past and they once again did an excellent job here. Overall, it's a decent novel, but not a great one. If one is an adult interested in starting to read Heinlein, I'd really recommend his [b:The Moon is a Harsh Mistress|16690|The Moon is a Harsh Mistress|Robert A. Heinlein|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1348768309s/16690.jpg|1048525] as a starting point. But, for the YA audience, I think the juveniles would work fairly well and this certainly isn't a bad one. ( )
  tjl | Jan 2, 2020 |
It’s been a few years since I read this one for the first time, but I'm quite sure that one of the first SF books I ever read was "Between Planets". Why do I know this? Because I didn't know what a Geiger counter was when I first read it. It seems quite strange by today’s standards to remember the pre-Internet Universe of the 80s where I might be interested in what a Geiger counter was and had no practical way to find out! I could have searched in an encyclopedia the next time I was in the library, but I was too young to think that, and I'd have slipped my mind anyway. In the early 80s, as a teenager I gobbled up his stuff like manna from the skies. I just wanted to be a part of the Lazarus Long family, and have some hot chick offer herself to me for “Many Hours of Pleasure…” I also thought Valentine Michael Smith had the dream life! Literally tons of dough sitting around the house, and women who were so into sex they'd starting 'doing it' right on the living room couch in front of everyone who happened to be there. Who wouldn't want that? I sure did! And being more than a little nerdy at the time, I found myself captivated by giant Rolling Roads, Star Beasts, Martians, Waldos, and larger-than-life magnates who gambled it all to go to the Moon to wreak havoc. I read and re-read many of his books well into my 20s and 30s, so entranced by those aspects (I still do as you can see by reading the reviews I wrote in 2018 and now 2019). Heinlein is usually bashed to the extent that people are bashing Shakespeare when they point out that “The Merchant of Venice” is anti-Semitic or that “The Taming of the Shrew” is misogynistic. If that is fair cultural criticism, so is talking about Heinlein's “weird” women issues which is also nonsense (vide “The Pleasant Profession of Robert A. Heinlein by Farah Mendlesohn for a good analysis on Heinlein’s Women). ( )
  antao | Jun 8, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 22 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (30 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Heinlein, Robert A.primary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bal, RuudTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Burns, JimCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Eiden, AndrewNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fonseca, EuricoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Freitas, Lima deCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gabrielsson, BjörnTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Geary, CliffordCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Holmberg, John-HenriAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kukalis, RomasCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Nagel, HeinzTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Patterson, WilliamIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Savage, SteeleIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Savage, SteeleCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sweet, DarrellIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sweet, Darrell K.Cover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Taylor, TravisForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
For Scott and Kent
For SCOTT and KENT
First words
"Easy, boy, easy!"
Quotations
Instead pay it forward to some other brother who needs it.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

When war threatens to break out between Venus and Earth, a boy with citizenship on both planets, attending school on Earth but whose home is on Mars, finds himself in an awkward situation.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Don Harvey, der in den USA auf ein Internat geht, erhält eines schönen Tages einen Brief. Darin wird er aufgefordert, umgehend zu seinen Eltern zu fliegen -- auf den Mars! Vorher soll er allerdings noch seinem mysteriösen "Onkel" Jefferson einen Besuch abstatten. Bald stellt der findige Junge fest, dass er von zweifelhaften Gestalten verfolgt wird, die anscheinend für die Erdregierung arbeiten. Und Jefferson kann nur durch Selbstmord verhindern, dass der Geheimdienst von der Bedeutung des Päckchens erfährt, dass er seinem "Neffen" gegeben hat. Ehe Don sich versieht, gerät er mitten in eine Auseinandersetzung zwischen den Bewohnern der Venus und der Erde.
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.59)
0.5
1 2
1.5 1
2 17
2.5 5
3 74
3.5 21
4 93
4.5 7
5 29

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 164,304,265 books! | Top bar: Always visible