HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

One of Our Thursdays Is Missing

by Jasper Fforde

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Thursday Next (6)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
2,1951155,571 (3.95)2 / 214
It is a time of unrest in the BookWorld. Only the diplomatic skills of ace literary detective Thursday Next can avert a devastating genre war. But a week before the peace talks, Thursday vanishes. Has she simply returned home to the RealWorld or is this something more sinister?
Recently added bycoreenm, private library, ADMeaux, cmcqueen20, becabooks, cattermune, j4ckstraw, reneeg
  1. 21
    Shades of Grey: The Road to High Saffron by Jasper Fforde (Kerian)
    Kerian: Though Shades of Grey stands apart from Fforde's other works for not at all being about books, he's most proud of it, the book keeps with his humor, and it should likewise be very enjoyable for fans of Fforde.
  2. 00
    Libriomancer by Jim C. Hines (TomWaitsTables)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

English (113)  Dutch (1)  Catalan (1)  All languages (115)
Showing 1-5 of 113 (next | show all)
So meta! It started slowly and really grew on me. I hope the Fforde Fiesta in Swindon is lots of fun. I love that he's made his crummy little hometown a hotbed of intrigue in his books. ( )
  Je9 | Aug 10, 2021 |
Endlessly imaginative, inventive and amusing. A book that loves books and is about the inside world of books. ( )
  Stephen.Lawton | Aug 7, 2021 |
Very slow going as compared to all of the others in the series. ( )
  JessBass87 | Jul 4, 2021 |
I really like the characterization in this one. ( )
  wetdryvac | Mar 2, 2021 |
If you happen to be a book nerd who likes fantasy, mystery, satire and a healthy dose of metafiction, the Thursday Next series will be right up your alley. It quickly became one of my favorite series after I read the first five books in a mad rush over the last year. However, after finishing the sixth installment, One of Our Thursdays is Missing, I’m unsure how I feel about the future of the Thursday Next books.

On one hand, One of Our Thursdays is Missing is a reboot with a different viewpoint character, but on the other hand it’s also the most self-referential of the entire series so far, and probably the worst possible place to jump into the series as a whole. Also, because it’s a Jasper Fforde book, telling you that there is a new viewpoint character is a huge oversimplification.

If you’re unfamiliar with the series, it’s about Thursday Next, a police detective in an alternate universe who is able to leap into fiction and uses her powers to solve mysteries both in the “RealWorld” and the “BookWorld”. That’s only scratching the surface, however; Fforde overstuffs the books with an insane number of alternate-world details and odd little touches. It makes the books almost impossible to accurately summarize.

The short version is that Thursday’s adventures were novelized by ghost writers in her world. What this means is that there is a “real” Thursday and a “fictional” Thursday. The fictional Thursday is sort of a cross between an actor and a clone of the real Thursday. Fictional Thursday only has to perform when someone in the RealWorld is reading one of her books. However, readership numbers are dropping and she finds herself with too much free time on her hands. When she hears rumors that the real Thursday may have disappeared, fictional Thursday begins a surreptitious investigation, and almost immediately finds herself in over her head.

Much like her RealWorld counterpart, fictional Thursday is driven to solve this mystery at all costs. However, she isn’t exactly like the real version; in the book series, her husband, Landen, was killed off in the first book to “raise the stakes”, and she finds herself envious of the real Thursday’s family. She also doesn’t consider herself quite as talented a detective, especially since she flunked her entrance exam for the BookWorld police force.

The overall portrayal of fictional Thursday is my main problem with this book. When we were initially introduced to this fictional version of Thursday in the fifth book, she was portrayed as a hippie do-gooder who is too much of a pacifist for proper police work. However, in this book she mostly just behaves like a less confident version of the real Thursday. She tells us that she would probably solve problems by hugging everyone, but it felt like I never really saw the differences in her personality in action. Mostly she just seemed like a diminished version of the real thing. Fforde takes away a lot of the real Thursday’s defining characteristics and doesn’t give us anything truly compelling in their stead.

Also, a word of warning: Fforde really likes to throw in little metafictional jokes. Some of the stuff in this book relies on a fairly thorough knowledge of previous events in the series. It was definitely a huge help that I’d read all of the books in short succession. I’m not sure I would have caught all of the little details that Fforde throws in otherwise. However, even with all of that knowledge, I was occasionally a bit confused by events, and wondered if Fforde knew what he was doing. My best advice is just to try to relax and enjoy the ride.

Ultimately, I have to say that this is my least favorite of the Thursday Next books. A lot of what I love about Fforde’s books is present – his incisive touch for satire, madcap plotting, and crackpot world-building – but it just didn’t have the same heart as the previous installments. I never really warmed up to the fictional Thursday Next as a protagonist. In my opinion, she doesn’t rise above her status as a stand-in for the real deal.

As for the future of the series, I’m not quite sure where it will go from here. The first four books are a sort of loose quartet, and when I finished the fifth it seemed likely that he was setting up another trilogy or quartet. Instead, Fforde made a complete left turn and gave us this book, which doesn’t really follow up on the fifth book and mostly ends up being a bit of a standalone story and/or narrative cul-de-sac. My hope is that Fforde has further adventures planned for the real Thursday Next, or that he at least does more to make the fictional Thursday’s perspective distinct if she returns in future volumes. ( )
  unsquare | Feb 16, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 113 (next | show all)
Even those new to the Nextian universe must admire the audacity of the world Fforde has created, with its Steampunk-influenced contraptions, double entendre literary landmarks and skewering of the publishing industry, even the popularity of "the ghostwriter's" books. Ironically, this abundance of material may also make this latest installment, remade world notwithstanding, a bit bewildering for those new to the series.
 
There is no denying Fforde’s supersized imagination, linguistic agility and love of books, Books, BOOKS. One of Our Thursdays is Missing is crowded with both classical references (he tweaks Russian literature for its of clusters of impossible to distinguish names) and bestseller citings (Shreve Plaza and Picoult Junction are suggestively close). Dickens and the great, deleted Samuel Pepys; Hemingway and FitzGerald; Ludlum and Grisham; Lord of the Rings and I, Robot — no era or genre or style of books gets left out.
 
Read the earlier books, then read One Of Our Thursdays Is Missing. It is pure, inspired lunacy and the funniest book you will see this year.
 
With places like Our Blessed Lady of the Lobster, a designated love interest and diabolical wordplays, puns and hilarious illustrations including one captioned “Don’t anyone move…I think we’ve driven into a mimefield” complete with a license plate reading ISBN, this madcap tale delivers great good fun.
 

» Add other authors (4 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Fforde, Jasperprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Allen, ThomasCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Meconis, DylanIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Miceli, JayaCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mudron, BillIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
For Tif Loehnis
To whom I owe my career
and my consequence
much else besides
First words
Everyone remembers where they were when the BookWorld was remade.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

It is a time of unrest in the BookWorld. Only the diplomatic skills of ace literary detective Thursday Next can avert a devastating genre war. But a week before the peace talks, Thursday vanishes. Has she simply returned home to the RealWorld or is this something more sinister?

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.95)
0.5 1
1 2
1.5
2 12
2.5 8
3 105
3.5 60
4 275
4.5 42
5 129

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

Recorded Books

An edition of this book was published by Recorded Books.

» Publisher information page

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 165,959,800 books! | Top bar: Always visible