HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Check out the Pride Celebration Treasure Hunt!
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

In the Skin of a Lion by Michael Ondaatje
Loading...

In the Skin of a Lion (1987)

by Michael Ondaatje

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,370344,003 (3.94)172
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 172 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 34 (next | show all)
I gave it 4 stars and then thought I should give it 3, and, at times while reading it, I wanted to give it 1...I loved it, liked it and just tolerated it...It is an experience I am glad I gave myself. Not a book I would "recommend" but definitely a book I would encourage others to experience... ( )
  jslantz1948 | Sep 15, 2018 |
I gave it 4 stars and then thought I should give it 3, and, at times while reading it, I wanted to give it 1...I loved it, liked it and just tolerated it...It is an experience I am glad I gave myself. Not a book I would "recommend" but definitely a book I would encourage others to experience... ( )
  jslantz1948 | Sep 15, 2018 |
I didn't really engage with this book. The historical research seems solid enough, and I enjoyed the Caravaggio escape story, but I never cared very much about the main character. And the technical details about the bridge-building, the tannery and the waterworks were just not all that interesting to me. It feels like a very masculine book - not something I'd normally think about, but that's just the impression I'm left with. ( )
  AJBraithwaite | Aug 14, 2017 |
My English teacher loved Ondaatje and loved the students who shared that love. Three or four years ago I attended a talk, [a:Joseph Boyden|88550|Joseph Boyden|https://d.gr-assets.com/authors/1253557607p2/88550.jpg] interviewing Ondaatje, neither of whom I'd read. I just liked hearing two writers talking to each other about craft and habits and everything like that. Ondaatje read a bit from his latest book, [b:The Cat's Table|11076177|The Cat's Table|Michael Ondaatje|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1327934764s/11076177.jpg|15238056], and that seems exemplary of my acquaintance with Ondaatje. I've heard him quoted. I've read a stray poem. I can talk about him but always feel like a bit of a sham because I hadn't read one of his novels till now.

This book wasn't a perfect novel for me (though it's undoubtedly a good book). I didn't like the present tense. I thought this was because I don't like present tense generally, but now I think it's because it gave such a transience to much of the novel that, apart from a few very sharp and memorable images, the pages bleed into one another and the text begins to fade because the present moment never lasts. I think that might be intentional. Even though there's a firmly established time period and this is all 'the past,' which we would like to perceive as concrete, the lives recorded fall out of history. They're impossible to fully grasp. A photo from the archive, the blueprint of a building, or a posthumous child might be all the remains of a person, all we have from which to reconstruct some narrative. But it's elusive and unpolished and incomplete.

What I'm saying is that obviously I thought a lot about this novel as I went through it and after and if that's what you want in a book then go for it and you might have an even richer experience. Reading Ondaatje finally justifies the respect I always held for him, but I'm not yet an adorer. ( )
  likecymbeline | Apr 1, 2017 |
Read it for the writing, even if you don't care for the story. The writing reminds me of the way one can blur their vision in order to take in the essence of a too bright day - when you take away your focus you can hear the birds and smell the pavement or fields or sea, you can feel the slight breeze or the oppressive air, you can see the palette of colors without the detail of the picture.

As another reviewer said, "Many of the passages are understandable on a level beyond the words. The ideas almost seep into a stream of consciousness which are not directly linked with the actual sentence." This is exactly it. It is magical. It is messy. It is utterly transfixing. ( )
  libbromus | Oct 20, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 34 (next | show all)
"In the Skin of a Lion stands alone, lovely and strange ... the book's special strength and delight is the exuberant but wonderfully controlled poetry of Ondaatje's workers."
added by GYKM | editLost Angeles Times
 
"It's an exotic blend of fact and fiction, bringing together real people and events and a cast of colourful fictional characters.... There is romance, lust and mystery."
added by GYKM | editProvince (Vancouver)
 
"Nearly every page reveals another example of Ondaatje's precise, beautiful and startlingly original language."
added by GYKM | editAtlanta Journal-Constitution
 
"In the Skin of a Lion has the scope and wealth of incident of a popular novel and the destiny and texture of a prose poem."
added by GYKM | editWashington Post Book World
 
"Intoxicatingly immediate."
added by GYKM | editSunday Times
 

» Add other authors (7 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Michael Ondaatjeprimary authorall editionscalculated
BascoveCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
The joyful will stoop with sorrow, and when
you have gone to the earth I will let my hair
grow long for your sake, I will wander through
the wilderness in the skin of a lion.

THE EPIC OF GILGAMESH

Never again will a single story be told as though it were only one.

JOHN BERGER
Dedication
This book is in memory of Michel Lambeth,
Sharon Stevenson, and Bill and Michael Acres

And for Linda, and Sarah Sheard and David Young
First words
IF HE IS AWAKE early enough the boy sees the men walk
past the farmhouse down First Lake Road.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Original language
Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0679772669, Paperback)

Bristling with intelligence and shimmering with romance, this novel tests the boundary between history and myth. Patrick Lewis arrives in Toronto in the 1920s and earns his living searching for a vanished millionaire and tunneling beneath Lake Ontario. In the course of his adventures, Patrick's life intersects with those of characters who reappear in Ondaatje's Booker Prize-winning The English Patient. 256 pp.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:14:38 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

Bristling with intelligence and shimmering with romance, this novel tests the boundary between history and myth. Patrick Lewis arrives in Toronto in the 1920s and earns his living searching for a vanished millionaire and tunneling beneath Lake Ontario. In the course of his adventures, Patrick's life intersects with those of characters who reappear in Ondaatje's Booker Prize-winning The English Patient.… (more)

» see all 5 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.94)
0.5
1 9
1.5
2 32
2.5 7
3 77
3.5 26
4 175
4.5 19
5 152

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 135,494,317 books! | Top bar: Always visible