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Fleshmarket Close by Ian Rankin
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Fleshmarket Close (2004)

by Ian Rankin

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1,944405,226 (3.81)54
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English (36)  Swedish (2)  Dutch (1)  Spanish (1)  All languages (40)
Showing 1-5 of 36 (next | show all)
It's annoying when titles get changed when books and films cross the Atlantic. It's baffling why Fleshmarket Close became Fleshmarket Alley in the US; American readers should feel cheated! Fleshmarket Close is a real Edinburgh thoroughfare, right by the North Bridge and Waverley Station. Fleshmarket Alley isn't. Fleshmarket Close also has a symbolic meaning; at the core of this book is the exploitation of illegal immigrants.

It's been sitting on my shelf for years, waiting for me to catch up with some of the earlier Rebus books which I have never caught up with. So I plunged in. It's clear straight away that Rebus's world has become much more complicated than it was in the early books in the series. This is a rather sprawling piece involving a missing teenager, skeletons unearthed by pub renovations, a murdered Kurdish journalist, a rapist newly out of Barlinnie, a dodgy fringe estate, an even dodgier detention centre for asylum seekers and a suave, self-important immigration officer from London. All of which are somehow linked. It all feels a bit improbable on reflection, but it's a good, satisfying read all the same.
( )
  enitharmon | Jan 14, 2019 |
It's annoying when titles get changed when books and films cross the Atlantic. It's baffling why Fleshmarket Close became Fleshmarket Alley in the US; American readers should feel cheated! Fleshmarket Close is a real Edinburgh thoroughfare, right by the North Bridge and Waverley Station. Fleshmarket Alley isn't. Fleshmarket Close also has a symbolic meaning; at the core of this book is the exploitation of illegal immigrants.

It's been sitting on my shelf for years, waiting for me to catch up with some of the earlier Rebus books which I have never caught up with. So I plunged in. It's clear straight away that Rebus's world has become much more complicated than it was in the early books in the series. This is a rather sprawling piece involving a missing teenager, skeletons unearthed by pub renovations, a murdered Kurdish journalist, a rapist newly out of Barlinnie, a dodgy fringe estate, an even dodgier detention centre for asylum seekers and a suave, self-important immigration officer from London. All of which are somehow linked. It all feels a bit improbable on reflection, but it's a good, satisfying read all the same.
( )
  enitharmon | Jan 14, 2019 |
It's the characters. That's how Rankin writes. But in this book dialog between cops is often a brick and the lead cops motives are murky (Why is Shiv meeting that Arsehole rich guy in a bar anyway-just take him in to the station).
Villains are interesting, but maybe a bit stock. The inbetweens--witnesses, bystanders, immigrants--are neither too good nor too bad.

But somehow the book does not hang together as his others do. I liked The Falls and Exit Music much better. ( )
  kerns222 | May 25, 2018 |
This was another good read from Ian Rankin. A set of complex plots which finally come together in the end for Rebus and Siobhan. Immigration and racial issues, which a lot of countries deal with, are the meat of the story. Rebus does not seem as depressed in this book as in some of the others. He is still contemplating retirement and hasn't made up his mind yet. I look forward to the next book and would recommend this series to those who love good suspense thrillers. ( )
  EadieB | May 22, 2018 |
I don't know who Roz Kaveney is, but starting the default description by saying this is "not one of the best of Rankin's John Rebus thrillers" is a tad subjective. I thoroughly enjoyed it and judging by the ratings, so did many others. ( )
  Siubhan | Feb 28, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 36 (next | show all)
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Epigraph
It is to Scotland that we look for our idea of civilisation.
(Voltaire)
The climate of Edinburgh is such that the weak succumb young...and the strong envy them.
(Dr Johnson to Boswell)
Dedication
In memory of two friends, Fiona and Annie, much missed.
First words
"I'm not supposed to be here," Detective Inspector John Rebus said.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Haiku summary
Gang protects its own
Jack's caught at a bordello
Wife's dead - who to blame?
(hardboiled)

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0752865633, Paperback)

An illegal immigrant is found murdered in an Edinburgh housing scheme: a racist attack, or something else entirely? Rebus is drawn into the case, but has other problems: his old police station has closed for business, and his masters would rather he retire than stick around. But Rebus is that most stubborn of creatures. As Rebus investigates, he must visit an asylum seekers' detention centre, deal with the sleazy Edinburgh underworld, and maybe even fall in love...Siobhan meanwhile has problems of her own. A teenager has disappeared from home and Siobhan is drawn into helping the family, which will mean travelling closer than is healthy towards the web of a convicted rapist. Then there's the small matter of the two skeletons - a woman and an infant - found buried beneath a concrete cellar floor in Fleshmarket Close. The scene begins to look like an elaborate stunt - but whose, and for what purpose? And how can it tie to the murder on the unforgiving housing-scheme known as Knoxland?

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:15:51 -0400)

(see all 7 descriptions)

Rebus investigates the murder of an illegal immigrant on a Edinburgh housing scheme. Meanwhile, Siobhan looks into the discovery of two skeletons found buried beneath a concrete cellar floor in Fleshmarket Close. The scene begins to look like an elaborate stunt - but whose, and for what purpose?… (more)

» see all 14 descriptions

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