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The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy

by Hannah Glasse

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1715118,357 (4.36)2
""A very interesting glimpse at everyday cooking in the daily life of 18th-19th century England, with many helpful tips, tricks, and recipes (for the day). The language is enjoyable and the information contained is substantial."" - Jefferson-Madison Regional Library SystemRevised and republished many times since its 1747 debut, this cookbook was a bestseller in England and the United States for more than 100 years. George Washington and Thomas Jefferson owned copies, and Benjamin Franklin even translated some of its recipes into French in hopes of attaining a taste of home while abroad. Author Hannah Glasse dismisses French cookery, the leading cuisine of her day, as inefficient for servants and middle- to lower-class cooks, citing its fussiness, expense, and waste. Instead, Mrs. Glasse focuses on standard Anglo-American fare, from soups and gravies to cakes and jellies, all simple dishes, prepared in a straightforward manner. In addition to practical advice on meat selection, carving, and basic cooking skills, this historically fascinating document offers tips on preparing food for the ill, cooking and food storage on ships, and making soaps and scents for the home. Historians, cooks, and all lovers of gastronomy will appreciate this glimpse into the kitchens of a bygone era.… (more)

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Showing 5 of 5
One of the key texts and fascinating reading. Most of the recipes bear cooking today. ( )
  AgedPeasant | Aug 28, 2020 |
A very interesting glimpse at everyday cooking in the daily life of 18th-19th century England, with many helpful tips, tricks and recipes (for the day). The language is enjoyable and the information contained is substantial.

The book starts off with a comprehensive guide to choosing healthy, fresh produce and animal proteins (there are a lot of animal proteins discussed in this book, as that was how people ate). Following the market guide are a variety of plainly written recipes for standard ingredients, with variations to try based on personal taste.

I found it surprisingly similar to how current cookbooks are planned out, beginning with an introduction explaining the reason for writing the book, and the goals that the author hopes to achieve. Next is an ingredient/market guide, and following are basic cooking techniques and recipes and variations for recipes. With the encyclopedic amount of helpful information contained in the book, I can understand how this would have been a valuable resource for any kitchen.

Compared to other cookery books of similar age, 'The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy' is extremely well written, and extremely thorough. Recipes were easier to interpret and understand. I am so happy that a 'new' edition has been published, so that this can be read far and wide! This book will be treasured by enthusiasts of both historical cooking and daily life. And if you own it as an ebook, searching will be a breeze.

**eARC netgalley** ( )
  Critterbee | Apr 16, 2018 |
A wonderful book from 1805 charting the history of food and eating.
The array of ingredients mentioned, most not used today, are mindblowing.
Jesuit powder - not sure what that is, Cod's head, Cardoons, Larks.....
The sections on how to cook ingredients are wonderful!
How to tell if certain foodstuffs are fresh is eyeopening!
There is so much comprehensive advice on cooking, serving food, plus menus and recipes, too much to comment on here.
Please read and enjoy!
I was given a digital copy of this book by the publisher via Netgalley in return for an honest unbiased review which I am delighted to do.
( )
  Welsh_eileen2 | Jan 23, 2016 |
It's difficult to review and rate a cookbook written for another time and place. As I read through the recipes, or perhaps I should call them receipts, I could not help but be thankful that much of the preparations that went into a meal at the turn of the 19th century are no longer required. We are able to go to the grocery store and pick up meat that has already been skinned, cut, and often deboned for us. Thanks to our transportation systems, foods that once were seasonal are often available year-round. This book must have been, as its title suggests, revolutionary for its time. It includes recipes that were inspired by the British West Indies and America. One can find recipes for haggis, moonshine, and lip balms, as well as the meats, vegetables, and sweets likely to be placed on the table. I could not help but think that Hannah Glasse must have been the Julia Child, or at least the Martha Stewart, of her time. This review is based on an e-galley provided by the publisher through NetGalley for review purposes. ( )
  thornton37814 | Dec 30, 2015 |
One of the bibles of 18th century cooking available today, Mrs. Glasse's receipts are fun, lively, often delicious, sometimes strange, always delightful to interpret.
1 vote ccrown | May 5, 2007 |
Showing 5 of 5
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""A very interesting glimpse at everyday cooking in the daily life of 18th-19th century England, with many helpful tips, tricks, and recipes (for the day). The language is enjoyable and the information contained is substantial."" - Jefferson-Madison Regional Library SystemRevised and republished many times since its 1747 debut, this cookbook was a bestseller in England and the United States for more than 100 years. George Washington and Thomas Jefferson owned copies, and Benjamin Franklin even translated some of its recipes into French in hopes of attaining a taste of home while abroad. Author Hannah Glasse dismisses French cookery, the leading cuisine of her day, as inefficient for servants and middle- to lower-class cooks, citing its fussiness, expense, and waste. Instead, Mrs. Glasse focuses on standard Anglo-American fare, from soups and gravies to cakes and jellies, all simple dishes, prepared in a straightforward manner. In addition to practical advice on meat selection, carving, and basic cooking skills, this historically fascinating document offers tips on preparing food for the ill, cooking and food storage on ships, and making soaps and scents for the home. Historians, cooks, and all lovers of gastronomy will appreciate this glimpse into the kitchens of a bygone era.

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