HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Have you checked out SantaThing, LibraryThing's gift-giving tradition?
dismiss
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Swords and Deviltry (1970)

by Fritz Leiber

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,771426,884 (3.75)36
The award-winning sword and sorcery classic that introduced Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser, from a Grand Master of Science Fiction and Fantasy. First in the influential fan-favorite series, Swords and Deviltry collects four fantastical adventure stories from Fritz Leiber, the author who coined the phrase "sword and sorcery" and helped birth an entire genre.   In "Induction," in the realm of Nehwon, fate brings young prince Fafhrd and apprentice magician the Gray Mouser together to mark the beginning of a loyal and lifelong friendship. Consumed by his wicked mother's enchantments, Fafhrd finds freedom by pursuing the love of a beautiful actress in the Nebula and Hugo Award-nominated "The Snow Women." Studying sorcery under a great wizard in a land where it is forbidden, Mouse crosses the thin line between white and black magic to avenge a great wrong in "The Unholy Grail." And in the Nebula and Hugo Award-winning novella "Ill Met in Lankhmar," Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser disguise themselves as beggars to infiltrate the Thieves' Guild--only to pay a horrible price for their greed when they come face-to-face with a monstrous evil.    … (more)
Recently added bySpringerLibrary, AnnaBookcritter, private library, RaysKaos, WDBooks, Ammianus, TBWeber
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 36 mentions

English (38)  French (3)  German (1)  All languages (42)
Showing 1-5 of 38 (next | show all)
I'm getting old, and can no longer save early books from the canon for some later date. I'm now trying to read through David Pringle's list of the 100 Best Fantasy Novels, and it's time for Leiber's fantasy series (which I'll read in order, of course, though I understand the individual elements were written and published more higgledy-piggledy than that).

I was just recently tremendously disappointed with Glory Road (a Heinlein), which seemed so old, so sexist, so frustrating. Swords and Deviltry, in contrast, felt so fresh, so modern, so engaging. I knew it was an old book (or, rightly, a collection of one two old novellas and one old story) but it wasn't as old as I'd pegged it before reading (in my head it was a 1930s sort-of-thing, not 1960s, which is a considerable difference), but regardless it read (especially "Ill-Met in Lankhmar") as if it had been published yesterday. Apparently the first Fafhrd/Mouser story was written in 1939, so I'm not far off conceptually, but those collected here are later).

What Lord the Rings did for "traipsing across the vastness" quest fantasy, Fritz Leiber has done for "rollicking urban buddy" fantasy. It's all there. Am I reading Swords and Deviltry or am I reading Lies of Locke Lamora, or The Crown Conspiracy, or The Name of the Wind? I've been thinking of those sorts of books as particularly 21st century, not having a clue (because I hadn't read the Fafhrd/Mouser series) of their tonal antecedents. I think Leiber may have invented the Thieves Guild, influenced Dungeons and Dragons, RPGs, video games ... he apparently coined the terms Heroic Fantasy and Swords & Sorcery.

I'm ecstatic that something that used to be so difficult to obtain (track down old editions of magazines, or obscure novels in used books stores) is now a few mouse clicks away, whether getting new printings from Amazon, ebooks for a Kobo or Kindle, or sourcing original texts from Abe.com ... sure, sometimes you're stuck with a dreadful Glory Road (which you can abandon midway, oh, the bliss!), and sometimes you're rewarded with a wonderful Fritz Leiber collection.

P.S. Had already read his Conjure Wife, three times, so I knew I liked him. I recommend it, the central premise is terrific. It's urban fantasy.

P.P.S. His writing (actual words, not plotting/characterization) is terrific. I kept smiling at the aptness of individual sentences.

(Note: 5 stars = amazing, wonderful, 4 = very good book, 3 = decent read, 2 = disappointing, 1 = awful, just awful. I'm fairly good at picking for myself so end up with a lot of 4s). I feel a lot of readers automatically render any book they enjoy 5, but I grade on a curve! ( )
  ashleytylerjohn | Oct 13, 2020 |
I enjoyed every page of this book.From the great northman(Fafhrd)to the smaller thief/magic-user apprentice(Gray Mouser)and their meeting each other. ( )
  chalton | Jul 14, 2020 |
Beefy & scrawny
both astoundingly stupid
each in their own way. ( )
1 vote Eggpants | Jun 25, 2020 |
I'm reading the first story. I remember it not at all, a tale of Fafhrd's origin and flying from the barbaric cold wastes to the civilized and rotten world of civilization. Giddy writing, marvelous fantasy names and mysteries, a fascinating main character, mothered and iced and father-orphaned into himself. Wonderful. ( )
  Wattsian | Nov 3, 2019 |
Pulpy sword-and-sorcery from a time when fantasy stories didn't have to be nine thousand pages long. ( )
  chaosfox | Feb 22, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 38 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (11 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Fritz Leiberprimary authorall editionscalculated
Fainza, HeidiCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fibla, JordiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ström, FredrikTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Taylor, GeoffCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Sundered from us by gulfs of time and stranger dimensions dreams the ancient world of Nehwon with its towers and skulls and jewels, its swords and sorceries.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

The award-winning sword and sorcery classic that introduced Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser, from a Grand Master of Science Fiction and Fantasy. First in the influential fan-favorite series, Swords and Deviltry collects four fantastical adventure stories from Fritz Leiber, the author who coined the phrase "sword and sorcery" and helped birth an entire genre.   In "Induction," in the realm of Nehwon, fate brings young prince Fafhrd and apprentice magician the Gray Mouser together to mark the beginning of a loyal and lifelong friendship. Consumed by his wicked mother's enchantments, Fafhrd finds freedom by pursuing the love of a beautiful actress in the Nebula and Hugo Award-nominated "The Snow Women." Studying sorcery under a great wizard in a land where it is forbidden, Mouse crosses the thin line between white and black magic to avenge a great wrong in "The Unholy Grail." And in the Nebula and Hugo Award-winning novella "Ill Met in Lankhmar," Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser disguise themselves as beggars to infiltrate the Thieves' Guild--only to pay a horrible price for their greed when they come face-to-face with a monstrous evil.    

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.75)
0.5 1
1 3
1.5 1
2 22
2.5 3
3 98
3.5 31
4 161
4.5 7
5 72

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 152,495,504 books! | Top bar: Always visible