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Multiple Choice (of 4)

Book talk

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1rolandperkins
Edited: Feb 1, 6:35pm Top

Correct reesapo bndeeer should ask the NEXT>

"Who wrote the play that Abraham Lincoln
was watching when he was assassinated?

1. William Shakespeare

2. Louis Bromfield

3. George Bernarrd Shaw

4. Tom Taylor

2lorannen
Feb 1, 7:18pm Top

>1 rolandperkins: Wrong group, perhaps? Not sure what this is about.

3rolandperkins
Feb 2, 8:18pm Top

"Wrong group perhaps?" (2)

The menu says that the group is "Book Talk". But I
don't know how to get it to appear in that group's menu.

4lilithcat
Feb 2, 9:10pm Top

>1 rolandperkins:

Correct reesapo bndeeer should ask the NEXT>

What does that even mean?

Was this supposed to be in one of the game groups?

6rolandperkins
Feb 5, 6:47pm Top

"Tom Taylor" ( 1>5)

Correct. Please set the "NEXT".

7lorannen
Feb 5, 7:15pm Top

>6 rolandperkins: Sorry, I'm still very confused. What does "reesapo bndeeer" even mean? This does look like a post meant for a game group, but I have no idea what's meant by "Please see the 'NEXT'.

8rolandperkins
Edited: Feb 5, 7:25pm Top

Oh, "See the "NEXT" is short for "See the next question".

"Reesapo bndeeer" somehow got onto the screen when what was
intended was "responder". Is a great typist like me really
capable of writing "reesapo bndeeer" for "responder", or is my
Spellcheck just playing tricks on me again?

9lilithcat
Feb 5, 7:44pm Top

>8 rolandperkins:

But where did you mean to post this? It looks as though you were trying to put this in an existing game thread.

10rolandperkins
Edited: Feb 6, 9:46pm Top

The correct answer to this (Tom Taylor) appears on another

of "Book Talk", but not on the currently "top" one. But this is
the Current One, according to the current timing.
That there's two threads is probably my fault, so my apologies.
But the question does have an answer.

11Crypto-Willobie
Feb 6, 11:55pm Top

All of the above.

12rolandperkins
Edited: Feb 11, 3:55pm Top

"All of the above" -- ??!

THe question of this thread is:

Who wrote the play that Abraham Lincoln was watching
when he was assassinated?
1. William Shakespeare
2. Louis Bromfield
3. George Bernard Shaw
4. Tom Taylor

THe correct answer (4): Tom Taylor was given
by Crypto Willobie (5), who should set the
next question.

13Crypto-Willobie
Feb 11, 4:10pm Top

Next question:

Who wrote All of the Above?

1. Me
2. You
3. Tom Taylor
4. He who smelt it

14rolandperkins
Feb 11, 4:15pm Top

I'd say "You" (2). But from your point
of view, it should be "Me" (1) !

15rocketjk
Feb 12, 1:33pm Top

Hope it's OK to jump the line.

Which novelist wondered the following:

"With what greater latitude, then, should we appraise the exact shade of mere mortal man, with his many passions and his miserable ingenuity in error, always dazzled by the base glitter of mixed motives, everlastingly betrayed by a short-sighted wisdom."

A) Tolstoy
B) Conrad
C) Malraux
D) Dostoevksy

16Lyndatrue
Feb 12, 2:19pm Top

>15 rocketjk: I choose C (Malraux) because it seems awfully like something Either A or D might have written, and I'm not familiar with Conrad's style enough to say if it might have been him. If it isn't C, then I suggest A. :-}

17rolandperkins
Edited: Feb 12, 8:08pm Top

Sounds more Tolstoyan than Dostoevskian to me. Conadian? --Maybe.
I'll guess (A): Tolstoy

18rocketjk
Feb 12, 3:34pm Top

How long do I wait to reveal the correct answer?

19rolandperkins
Edited: Feb 12, 7:28pm Top

Hmm, I didn't think of that. My own opinion would be:
about 1/2 of a day. Good question, b t w; at least 3 options
are definite possibilities.

20rocketjk
Edited: Feb 12, 10:25pm Top

OK, time's up! The answer is B) Conrad. The quote is from Conrad's novel about Russian revolutionaries, Under Western Eyes. It is a touch below the level of Conrad's greatest works, but I still think it's an under-rated book. Here is the paragraph the quote comes from. I meant to include a longer passage, but realized it constituted a plot spoiler:

This much said, there is no need to tell anything more of that first interview and of the several others. To the morality of a Western reader an account of these meetings would wear perhaps the sinister character of old legendary tales where the Enemy of Mankind is represented holding subtly mendacious dialogues with some tempted soul. It is not my part to protest. Let me but remark that the Evil One, with his single passion of satanic pride for the only motive, is yet, on a larger, modern view, allowed to be not quite so black as he used to be painted. With what greater latitude, then, should we appraise the exact shade of mere mortal man, with his many passions and his miserable ingenuity in error, always dazzled by the base glitter of mixed motives, everlastingly betrayed by a short-sighted wisdom.

21rolandperkins
Edited: Feb 19, 6:55pm Top

If I remember the rules rightly,* you are the one, rocketjk,
to set the "NEXT".

*And I should--I invented the thread (butmultiple choice is not as
simple as it seems. In this thread it seems to be very
puzzling to several of the members, and I have no idea of how to
simplify (?) it, if that what it needs.

22rocketjk
Feb 19, 7:42pm Top

OK. I'll try to come up with something soon.

Group: Book talk

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