The Americana Series Monthly Challenge – December 2021: Colorado

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The Americana Series Monthly Challenge – December 2021: Colorado

1bhabeck
Dec 1, 2021, 9:13am

Each month, we will visit a different state in the United States of America for the Monthly Reading Challenge in the Mystery & Suspense Extra! Group. This month, we head back west to COLORADO.

The Americana Series Monthly Challenge – December 2021: Colorado


History
Colorado is a state in the Mountain West subregion of the Western United States. It encompasses most of the Southern Rocky Mountains, as well as the northeastern portion of the Colorado Plateau and the western edge of the Great Plains. Colorado is the eighth most extensive and 21st most populous U.S. state. The 2020 United States Census enumerated the population of Colorado at 5,773,714, an increase of 14.80% since the 2010 United States Census.

The region has been inhabited by Native Americans for more than 13,000 years, with the Lindenmeier Site containing artifacts dating from approximately 9200 BC to 1000 BC; the eastern edge of the Rocky Mountains was a major migration route for early peoples who spread throughout the Americas. "Colorado" is the Spanish adjective meaning "ruddy", the color of red sandstone. The Territory of Colorado was organized on February 28, 1861, and on August 1, 1876, U.S. President Ulysses S. Grant signed Proclamation 230 admitting Colorado to the Union as the 38th state. Colorado is nicknamed the "Centennial State" because it became a state one century after the signing of the United States Declaration of Independence.

Denver is the capital and most populous city in Colorado. Residents of the state are known as Coloradans, although the antiquated "Coloradoan" is occasionally used. Colorado is a comparatively wealthy state, ranking eighth in household income in 2016, and 11th in per capita income in 2010. It also ranks highly in the nation's standard of living index. Major parts of the economy include government and defense, mining, agriculture, tourism, and increasingly other kinds of manufacturing. With increasing temperatures and decreasing water availability, Colorado's agriculture, forestry, and tourism economies are expected to be heavily affected by climate change.

Geography

Colorado is bordered by Wyoming to the north, Nebraska to the northeast, Kansas to the east, Oklahoma to the southeast, New Mexico to the south, Utah to the west, and touches Arizona to the southwest at the Four Corners. Colorado is noted for its vivid landscape of mountains, forests, high plains, mesas, canyons, plateaus, rivers, and desert lands. Colorado is one of the Mountain States and is a part of the western and southwestern United States.

Colorado is notable for its diverse geography, which includes alpine mountains, high plains, deserts with huge sand dunes, and deep canyons. In 1861, the United States Congress defined the boundaries of the new Territory of Colorado exclusively by lines of latitude and longitude, stretching from 37°N to 41°N latitude, and from 102°02′48″W to 109°02′48″W longitude (25°W to 32°W from the Washington Meridian). After 160 years of government surveys, the borders of Colorado were officially defined by 697 boundary markers and 697 straight boundary lines. Colorado, Wyoming, and Utah are the only states that have their borders defined solely by straight boundary lines with no natural features. The southwest corner of Colorado is the Four Corners Monument at 36°59′56″N, 109°2′43″W. The Four Corners Monument, located at the place where Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, and Utah meet, is the only place in the United States where four states meet.


Fun Facts
Colorado is the only state in history, to turn down the Olympics. In 1976 the Winter Olympics were planned to be held in Denver. 62% of all state Voters choose at almost the last minute not to host the Olympics, because of the cost, pollution and population boom it would have on the State Of Colorado, and the City of Denver.

Colorado contains 75% of the land area of the U.S. with an altitude over 10,000 feet. The Colorado Rockies are part of the North American Cordillera, which stretches 3,000 miles from Alaska, through western Canada and the United States, into northern Mexico. The centerpieces of this dramatic uplift are the peaks over 14,000 feet, or “Fourteeners”, as they are affectionately referred to by climbers. There are 52 Fourteeners in Colorado. (Alaska has 22; California has 12; Washington has 1). At 14,110 feet above sea level over 400,000 people ascend Pikes Peak each year.


The tallest sand dune in America is in Great Sand Dunes National Monument outside of Alamosa. This bizarre 46,000-acre landscape of 700-foot sand peaks was the creation of ocean waters and wind more than one million years ago.


The Colorado River with its origin in the mountains of Colorado and Wyoming provides water and hydroelectric power to at least 35 million people in the United States and Mexico.

One of the West’s greatest hoaxes was the Solid Muldoon. It was “discovered” near Pueblo in 1877 and was passed off as the petrified body of an ancient man. The statue was of a man in a reclining position. It was 7 1/2 feet tall and weighed around 450 pounds. The figure had a short tail at the base of the spine, and the Solid Muldoon was touted as Darwin’s “missing link.” It was cast out of Portland cement.

Christopher O’Brian, the author of Enter the Valley, says the San Luis Valley, which stretches from Saguache to Taos, New Mexico, has America’s highest concentration of UFO sightings, crop circles, and Bigfoot sightings, as well as cattle mutilations and appearances of mysterious aircraft.

A prison located in Florence, Colorado called the SuperMax is the highest-security level of federal prison in the country. The long list of inmates includes many international and domestic terrorists, along with double agents.


The Stanley Hotel in Estes Park, Colorado was the inspiration behind Stephen King’s infamous horror novel, The Shining. Try not to think of that during your stay.


Colorado once had 3 Governors in a single day - On March 17, 1905, Democrat Alva Adams, was forced to resign because of election improprieties (one district had 717 votes for Adams but only 100 registered voters). He was replaced by Republican James H. Peabody, who had run against him in the election, on the condition that he immediately resign. He did so, yielding to his Lieutenant Governor, Jesse F. McDonald.

Mesa Verde features an elaborate four-story city carved in the cliffs by the Ancestral Pueblo people between 600 and 1300 A.D. The mystery surrounding this ancient cultural landmark is the sudden disappearance of the thousands of inhabitants who created the more than 4,000 identified structures.


If you have ever received a tire clamp on your car, you can thank the Mile-High City for that. The first tire clamp was invented by the concert violinist, Frank Marugg in Denver in 1944. Since then, his invention has been used by Denver’s finest and the Department of Motor Vehicles in forcing drivers to pay outstanding tickets. On January 5, 1955, the Denver police officially put the boot into effect. In its first twenty-five days, the city collected over $18,000 in unpaid parking tickets.


Colorado has more microbreweries per capita than any other state.

The highest suspension bridge in the world is over the Royal Gorge near Canon City. The Royal Gorge Bridge spans the Arkansas River at a height of 1,053 feet.


The Dinosaur Hotel (once a franchise hotel) is decked out in dinosaur décor and visuals. Located on South Vance Street in Lakewood, this hotel is blanketed with dinosaur statues, bones, and other historical ornaments and designs. The Dinosaur Hotel celebrates Lakewood’s rich history of dinosaur discovery in the area. In fact, Lakewood is where the first Stegosaurus and Apatosaurus bones were found by paleontologists years ago. The first dinosaur fossil discovered in Colorado was the skeleton of a Diplodocus, which was found on the ridge of the Hogback near Morrison in 1877. At the time of its discovery, it was the largest dinosaur skeleton known, measuring about 70 feet long, with a hipbone measuring nearly 8 feet long. However, there was no place in Denver to erect and house the skeleton at the time of the discovery, so it was shipped to a museum in New York.


Notable Residents

As the Railroad progressed toward Denver in the mid-1860s, thousands of railroad workers had to be fed. A “catering” firm hired scores of hunters, most notably William Frederick Cody. In 17 months on the job, Cody roamed the plains, killing buffalo to feed the railroad crews. He counted the number of buffalo who died at this hand — a staggering 4,280, earning him the name “Buffalo Bill.” Throughout his life, he was a courier, pony express rider, stagecoach driver, wagon master, trapper, hunter, and Wild West Show promoter — introducing Annie Oakley Buffalo Bill Cody is buried atop Lookout Mountain, west of Denver, overlooking the Plains he loved so dearly.

Mary Florence Lathrop, the first practicing female lawyer in Denver, opened her law office in 1897. Called “That Damn Woman!” by her male peers, she became the American Bar Association’s first female member in 1917. She practiced law in a lace apron until she died in 1951 at age 85.

Denver madam Mattie Silks was a participant in history’s first duel between women. At a party on the night of Aug.25, 1877, a woman named Katie Fulton was making obvious advances toward Silks’ longtime love, Cortez Thomson. Incensed, Silks challenged Fulton to a pistol duel. The women paced, turned, and fired, whereby Silks missed Fulton entirely. Thomson screamed and fell, having taken a shot, probably from Fulton, in the neck. Thompson’s injury was just a flesh wound, and a brawl ensued. Fulton left by train for Kansas the next day, nursing a broken nose.

Mystery authors from Colorado include: Diane Mott Davidson, Sandra Dallas, Manuel Ramos, John Dunning, and Nancy Atherton. Others include: Blake Crouch, Sandhya Menon, Joseph Hutchison (Colorado's Poet Laureate) and Margaret Coel.

In honor of COLORADO, read a Mystery/Suspense book (any sub-genre will do!) that satisfies one or more of the following:

• A Mystery/Suspense book with "Indian," "Mountain," "River," "Four," or "Red" in the title OR has a picture of a beer, a mountain, or a dinosaur on the cover OR has a cover that is more than 75% red;

• A Mystery/Suspense book that takes place in a mountainous area OR involves a main character who is a lawyer OR involves a UFO (or has a science fiction setting); and

• A Mystery/Suspense book where the author's FIRST and LAST initial (no middle initials or names) can be found in COLORADO.


Happy Reading ❤

2bhabeck
Edited: Jan 2, 12:37am

Brenda's Americana Challenge - December 2021: Colorado
1 of 3 Complete


In honor of COLORADO, read a Mystery/Suspense book (any sub-genre will do!) that satisfies one or more of the following:

• A Mystery/Suspense book with "Indian," "Mountain," "River," "Four," or "Red" in the title OR has a picture of a beer, a mountain, or a dinosaur on the cover OR has a cover that is more than 75% red;
The Cat Who Sniffed Glue by Lilian Jackson Braun; mostly red cover; 12/31/21; 3.5 stars

• A Mystery/Suspense book that takes place in a mountainous area OR involves a main character who is a lawyer OR involves a UFO (or has a science fiction setting); and
Vengeance In Death by J. D. Robb; sci-fi setting; finished 12/—/21; — stars

• A Mystery/Suspense book where the author's FIRST and LAST initial (no middle initials or names) can be found in COLORADO.

3Carol420
Edited: Dec 16, 2021, 9:42am


📌 - ★
3/3

Carol is Going to Book a Room Here

📌1, A Mystery/Suspense book with "Indian," "Mountain," "River," "Four," or "Red" in the title OR has a picture of a beer, a mountain, or a dinosaur on the cover OR has a cover that is more than 75% red;
Blood Red Road -Moira Young - 3.5★ (Red in the title & the cover is red)

📌2. A Mystery/Suspense book that takes place in a mountainous area OR involves a main character who is a lawyer OR involves a UFO (or has a science fiction setting)
Magic Hour - Kristen Hanna - (takes place in the mountains of Washington)

📌3. A Mystery/Suspense book where the author's FIRST and LAST initial (no middle initials or names) can be found in COLORADO.
Out Behind The Barn - Chad Lutzke - 3★ (C & L)

4gaylebutz
Dec 1, 2021, 5:56pm

I'm going to read Mystery at an Irish Christmas by Carlene O'Connor. The author's FIRST and LAST initial (no middle initials or names) can be found in COLORADO.

5bhabeck
Dec 1, 2021, 7:12pm

>4 gaylebutz: I read her first book in that series earlier this year

6Olivermagnus
Edited: Dec 30, 2021, 6:18pm



Americana Challenge - December 2021: Colorado
3
of 3 Complete

In honor of COLORADO, read a Mystery/Suspense book (any sub-genre will do!) that satisfies one or more of the following:

🍺 A Mystery/Suspense book with "Indian," "Mountain," "River," "Four," or "Red" in the title OR has a picture of a beer, a mountain, or a dinosaur on the cover OR has a cover that is more than 75% red
Exit Strategy - Kelley Armstrong - 4 Stars - 12/12/21


🍺 A Mystery/Suspense book that takes place in a mountainous area OR involves a main character who is a lawyer OR involves a UFO (or has a science fiction setting);
What I've Done - Melinda Leigh - 4.5 Stars - 12/25/21 - MC = Morgan Dane

🍺 • A Mystery/Suspense book where the author's FIRST and LAST initial (no middle initials or names) can be found in COLORADO.
Finding Claire Fletcher - 4 Stars - 12/3/21 - LR

7gaylebutz
Edited: Dec 1, 2021, 9:36pm

>5 bhabeck: It was described as a cozy but the characters are fairly realistic not cutesy. I’m liking it so far and may try another in the series. And I like the little dose of Christmas. 🎅

8gaylebutz
Dec 9, 2021, 5:45pm

Done - Murder at an Irish Christmas by Carlene O'Connor - 4 ★
The author's FIRST and LAST initial (no middle initials or names) can be found in COLORADO.

9Carol420
Dec 10, 2021, 8:41am

>8 gaylebutz:



Congratulations. Well done, Gayle

10Sergeirocks
Edited: Dec 19, 2021, 7:47am

A Christmas Carol - Charles Dickens 4.5★s (Author’s initials in COLORADO)
Final Appeal - Lisa Scottoline 4.5★s (Main character is a lawyer)
Trouble in Paradise - Robert B. Parker 4.5★s (Book’s cover predominantly red)

11Carol420
Dec 16, 2021, 9:45am

All done. Love the dinosaur but NO WAY am I crossing that suspension bridge!!!!!

12bhabeck
Edited: Dec 27, 2021, 12:09am

>11 Carol420: >10 Sergeirocks: >8 gaylebutz: Well Done all of you!

Carol - that bridge shouldn’t scare you - you have the Mackinac Bridge! That one can get a bit scary during storms

13Carol420
Edited: Dec 27, 2021, 6:55am

>12 bhabeck: I love Big Mac...but I'll drive across it...I'll ride across it... but no way am I walking across it. Especially when you reach the point that there is only water...and DEEP water... as far as you can see.

14Sergeirocks
Dec 29, 2021, 12:22pm

I have a phobia of bridges and also of heights - I’m with Carol, NO WAY could I cross this one (or get within sight of it! 🙂).

15Carol420
Dec 29, 2021, 12:26pm

>14 Sergeirocks: Glad to see I'm going to have company. Spiders and heights are about the only things I'm really phobic about. You and I can just sit and watch all the rest cross over and call emergency services when they fall off and break their necks! We can read, Reading will only give us paper cuts.

16Olivermagnus
Dec 30, 2021, 6:20pm

All Done!

17bhabeck
Dec 30, 2021, 9:39pm

18bhabeck
Dec 30, 2021, 9:42pm

LOL…I’m going to be lucky to finish one of the books this month. I’ve been visiting my mother in WI since the 17th and whenever we’re not busy, we’ve been playing cards. (She’s not happy ‘cause I’ve been winning! 😂).

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