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Lords and Ladies (1992)

by Terry Pratchett

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Discworld: Witches (4), Discworld (14)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
8,952113736 (4.02)206
'When you start believing in Spirits, you start believing in demons, and then before you know where you are, you're believing in Gods. And then you're in trouble.' Reality is all very well in small doses. It's a perfectly conventional and convenient way of neutralising the imagination. But sometimes when there's more than one reality at play, imagination just won't be neutralised, and the walls between realities come tumbling down. Unfortunately there's usually a damned good reason for there being walls between them in the first place. To keep things out. Things who want to make mischief and play havoc with the natural order...… (more)
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» See also 206 mentions

English (106)  Spanish (1)  Polish (1)  Russian (1)  Swedish (1)  Italian (1)  Norwegian (1)  Dutch (1)  All languages (113)
Showing 1-5 of 106 (next | show all)
This book mostly focuses on the Elves as the fae folk in old tales that tricked and messed with humans. It also has a lot of references to Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”.

I really like the witches as characters and the themes chosen to be addressed in the witches’ books. However, these books never seem to be my favourites in the Discworld series. I prefer when the three witches work as a group and in this book they are mostly separated from each other.

My favourite part was to find out a bit more about Granny Weatherwax’s past (including that she used to date Ridcully and that there is a timeline where they are married). I also enjoyed some of the elves scenes, but I which there were more of those and they were even more awful. They had potential to be even better at being the worst. Magrat’s struggles with her new role as almost queen were fun at first, but at times it seemed repetitive. Still, she was great in this book.

I don’t have much to comment on this. It was not the best and not the worst Discworld book. It was good. ( )
  elderlingfae | Aug 11, 2022 |
Skemmti mér konunglega yfir þessari sögu. Hér snýr Pratchett álfatrúnni á hvolf og þeir eru í raun og veru alillar verur sem skemmta sér best við að pynta óæðri mannverur. Blessaðar nornirnar eru mættar til að verjast þeim en einnig eru galdramenn Galdraháskólans komnir á svæðið enda stendur mikið til því yngsta nornin á að giftast sínu heittelskaða fyrrum hirðfífli og núverandi kóngi. ( )
  SkuliSael | Apr 28, 2022 |
Lords and Ladies is a lesser Discworld novel, coming hot on the heels of one of the best in the series so far (Small Gods). Even though it's a direct sequel to Witches Abroad, which I found to be one of the more tedious books of the entire series, it is clearer and more enjoyable. That said, there's not much in this one to move you out of second gear.

Plot is never really a strength even in the best Discworld novels, with things always being a bit harum-scarum, but Lords and Ladies keeps it relatively simple. The return of the elves, the 'Lords and Ladies' of the title, is rather an ingenious idea. You see, in the Discworld, elves were renowned for being beautiful but, since their eclipse, people have forgotten that they were also evil and malicious. As Pratchett puts it, "We're like mice saying, 'Say what you like, cats have got real style'" (pg. 137).

When the elves do finally arrive, the book loses its way a bit; it's not all that clear what they want, or how they're trying to achieve it. It's as though Pratchett had been holding a card in reserve for much of the story, only to forget to play it. After such a slow but intriguing build-up, this was a disappointment, and the blow-by-blow account of the fighting at the end got a bit muddled. It unravels a little bit, but it says a lot for Pratchett's idiosyncratic talent that the reader gets their dependable Discworld dose no matter the objective quality of the story being told. ( )
1 vote MikeFutcher | Nov 27, 2021 |
I've come to the realization, after reading a third of the Discworld novels, that Pratchett would have to shit the bed quite strenuously to produce a bad one.

That being said, while I got a few chuckles out of this one, and quite enjoyed the story overall, this one didn't seem quite as successful as the last three or four. I can't put my finger on why. Hell, maybe it's just me in a coronavirus funk.

Still, for all of that, even a slightly unsuccessful Discworld novel is time well-spent. ( )
  TobinElliott | Sep 3, 2021 |
I can really relate to Magrat. ( )
  Septima | Aug 21, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 106 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (23 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Terry Pratchettprimary authorall editionscalculated
JaelCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kirby, JoshCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Planer, NigelNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sabanosh, MichaelCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stone, MikeAuthor photosecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Now read on . . .
When does it start?
There are very few starts.
Quotations
In front of her [Nanny Ogg] the cat Greebo, glad to be home again, lay on his back with all four paws in the air, doing his celebrated something-found-in-the-gutter impersonation.
'I learned my craft from Nanny Gripes,' said Granny Weatherwax, 'who learned it from Goody Heggety, who got it from Nanna Plumb, who was taught it by Black Aliss, who --'

'So what you're saying is,' said Diamanda, loading the words into the sentence like cartridges in a chamber, 'that no one has actually learned anything new?'
Elves are wonderful. They provoke wonder.
Elves are marvelous. They cause marvels.
Elves are fantastic. They create fantasies.
Elves are glamorous. They project glamour.
Elves are enchanting. They weave enchantment.
Elves are terrific. They beget terror.
The thing about words is that meanings can twist just like a snake, and if you want to find snakes look for them behind words that have changed their meaning.
No one ever said elves are nice.
Much human ingenuity has gone into finding the ultimate Before. The current state of knowledge can be summarized thus: In the beginning, there was nothing, which exploded. Other theories about the ultimate start involve gods creating the universe out of the ribs, entrails, and testicles of their father. ** There are quite a lot of these. They are interesting, not for what they tell you about cosmology, but for what they say about people.
People think that they live life as a moving dot traveling from the Past into the Future, with memory streaming out behind them like some kind of mental cometary tail. But memory spreads out in front as well as behind. It’s just that most humans aren’t good at dealing with it, and so it arrives as premonitions, forebodings, intuitions, and hunches. Witches are good at dealing with it, and to suddenly find a blank where these tendrils of the future should be has much the same effect on a witch as emerging from a cloud bank and seeing a team of sherpas looking down on him does on an airline pilot.
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'When you start believing in Spirits, you start believing in demons, and then before you know where you are, you're believing in Gods. And then you're in trouble.' Reality is all very well in small doses. It's a perfectly conventional and convenient way of neutralising the imagination. But sometimes when there's more than one reality at play, imagination just won't be neutralised, and the walls between realities come tumbling down. Unfortunately there's usually a damned good reason for there being walls between them in the first place. To keep things out. Things who want to make mischief and play havoc with the natural order...

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Book description
THE FAIRIES ARE BACK – BUT THIS TIME THEY DON’T JUST WANT YOUR TEETH…

Granny Weatherwax and her tiny coven are up against real elves.

It’s Midsummer Night.

No times for dreaming…

With full supporting cast of dwarfs, wizards, trolls, Morris dancers and one orang-utan. And lots of hey-nonny-nonny and blood all over the place.
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