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Tarzan and the Forbidden City (1938)

by Edgar Rice Burroughs

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Tarzani lood (19. raamat), Tarzan (20)

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393551,418 (3.45)2
Tarzan cared little for the fate of adventurer Brian Gregory, drawn to the legendary city of Ashair by the rumor of the Father of Diamonds, the world's hugest gem. But to the ape-man the tie of friendship was unbreakable, and Paul d'Arnot's pleas moved him to agree to guide the expedition Gregory's father and sister organized for his rescue. The enigmatic Atan Thome was also obsessed with the Father of Diamonds, and planted agents in the Gregory safari to spy out its route and sabotage its efforts. Both parties reached their goal, remote Ashair . . . as prisoners of its priests, doomed to die in loathsome rites.… (more)
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Showing 5 of 5
The most farcical of the adventures yet. Girls keep getting captured by evil tribes, gorillas and cannibals. Tarzan helps hunt for a missing American and ends up under water. ( )
  LindaLeeJacobs | Feb 15, 2020 |
http://nwhyte.livejournal.com/2276948.html

This is a fairly rambling quest story of lost Europeans and sacred jewels in hidden cities (there are actually two of them, not one as implied in the title). Tarzan cares much more about white people than Indians, and more about Indians than apes, and more about apes than Africans, as far as I can tell; there is a telling moment when he and his friends allow a galley to sink with its slaves still chained to the oars, giving it barely a glance.

Despite all this, it's a story with an interesting history. It may have seemed familiar to me because it was adapted as the fourth episode of the animated Tarzan, Lord of the Jungle show which I watched as a child. But it originated as an adaptation by Burroughs, in six parts under the title The Red Star of Tarzan, in Argosy earlier in 1938, of a radio story by Rob Thompson, Tarzan and the Diamond of Asher, whose 39 episodes can be found here. It was apparently also used for a newspaper comic strip in early 1938, and adapted for the Tarzan comic in 1970. One of those stories which sums Tarzan up, in any medium. ( )
  nwhyte | May 3, 2014 |
Burroughs obviously was getting really sick of the Tarzan series because he didn't try to cover up some faux pas in his story, and there were a couple of hard leaps for the imagination to make. There are two groups of men who want to get the Father of Diamonds in the midst of the ForbiDDEN CITY, and who variously capture or are captured by each other. Lady Kath at one point when told she would probably be killed, says: "I wish they would do it and get it over withy. I am so tired." She ought to be. She had been stranded, found, captured, rescued, captured again, and rescued again and faced death atg least five tgimes before we end the book. Onje wag has said, a work of art is over when the artist says it is and we can just see ERB at his desk saying: "Okay. I'm not even bothering to get them out of the jujngle. Let's tie up the ends and throw it to the press." ( )
1 vote andyray | Jul 28, 2010 |
Tarzan's old friend, Paul D'Arnot, asks his help to rescue a lost friend in the jungle. Their quest leads them to an underwater temple, deep in a crater lake, where priests protect a fabulous diamond that has caused war between two cities, and has the ability to cloud men's minds. ( )
  burnit99 | Jan 1, 2007 |
Tarzan almost loses his life in the strangest temple he has ever visited – an underwater building, deep in a crater lake – where priests protect the fabulous diamond that has caused war between Thobos and Ashair.
  rajendran | Jul 23, 2006 |
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» Add other authors (5 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Edgar Rice Burroughsprimary authorall editionscalculated
Marsh, JesseIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Powers, DickCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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The rainy season was over; and forest and jungle were a riot of lush green starred with myriad tropical blooms, alive with the gorgeous coloring and raucous voices of countless birds, scolding, loving, hunting, escaping; alive with chattering monkeys and buzzing insects which all seemed to be busily engaged in doing things in circles and getting nowhere, much after the fashion of their unhappy cousins who dwell in unlovely jungles of brick and marble and cement.
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Tarzan cared little for the fate of adventurer Brian Gregory, drawn to the legendary city of Ashair by the rumor of the Father of Diamonds, the world's hugest gem. But to the ape-man the tie of friendship was unbreakable, and Paul d'Arnot's pleas moved him to agree to guide the expedition Gregory's father and sister organized for his rescue. The enigmatic Atan Thome was also obsessed with the Father of Diamonds, and planted agents in the Gregory safari to spy out its route and sabotage its efforts. Both parties reached their goal, remote Ashair . . . as prisoners of its priests, doomed to die in loathsome rites.

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