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Now You See It: How the Brain Science of…
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Now You See It: How the Brain Science of Attention Will Transform the Way…

by Cathy N. Davidson

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Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
I follow Cathy Davidson on Twitter, and read the reviews of this book in the NYT when it came out. So far, fascinating, and inspiring. Reassessing the importance of attention in the classroom, and the ways in which the traditional "industrial age" classroom has become obsolete are extremely important observations in this, the Information Age. Ms. Davidson is documenting a revolution in the way we think; it would be wise for educational institutions to be aware of (and act on) her commentary.
  voncookie | Jun 30, 2016 |
I follow Cathy Davidson on Twitter, and read the reviews of this book in the NYT when it came out. So far, fascinating, and inspiring. Reassessing the importance of attention in the classroom, and the ways in which the traditional "industrial age" classroom has become obsolete are extremely important observations in this, the Information Age. Ms. Davidson is documenting a revolution in the way we think; it would be wise for educational institutions to be aware of (and act on) her commentary.
  anna_hiller | Jun 22, 2016 |
Don't be fooled by the cheeky title. In "Now You See It" Davidson manages to bridge research from neuroscience, education and business together to create a truly unique explanation for how our brains are changing in the post-internet age and how our schools and workplaces are slowly (and they are very slow) catching up.

Davidson writes with a cheerful optimism and effortlessly fuses personal anecdotes and academic research to make "Now You See It" an easy read. At the same time, she covers many topics through many disciplines and is careful never to jump to easy conclusions. Recommended. ( )
  jasonli | Sep 12, 2013 |
This book makes a strong case for collaboration and diversity if you want to see a big picture. I've seen this to be true in both work and social situations. Some things I’m thinking about as a result of reading it:
• Sometimes “pilot” can be just a label you give a project when you want a soft launch—might be better to leave expectations more open so that you won’t overlook unanticipated findings?
• She has a “strengths based” approach to a happy life, which I agree with. But I wonder if specializing too early, saying “I’m not good at that, interested in that” might cut off options later? Don't most jobs, relationships require that you be out of your comfort zone some of the time?
• Everyone needs to think "how can I jolt myself out of my routines so that I might see other options, areas for growth based on new technologies and opportunities?"
• Many of her examples of good environments for learning and working seem to come down to having truly engaged teachers and bosses—the exact techniques may matter less than just having someone thinking, aware, trying?
• It's a hopeful idea that if you think you are good at something you may actually be better at it than if you don’t. Believing clichés and excuses about getting older actually could make them come true?

Quotes:
• “When you think of learning as something external to yourself, learning becomes a levy—an assessment, not an asset. The assessment no longer matters after the schooling stops. The asset is a resource one draws on for a lifetime. “
• "If there is any word that defines the twentieth century, it might be normative: a defining and enforcing of standards of what counts as correct."

( )
  ehousewright | May 10, 2013 |
The Technological changes around us are of unprecedented proportions. What effects this has on us and what it tells us about human nature more generally is a central question for society and for all of us personally.
  brockportcelt | Jun 12, 2012 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0670022829, Hardcover)

A digital innovator shows how we can thrive in the new technological age.

When Cathy Davidson and Duke University gave free iPods to the freshman class in 2003, critics said they were wasting their money. Yet when students in practically every discipline invented academic uses for their music players, suddenly the idea could be seen in a new light-as an innovative way to turn learning on its head.

This radical experiment is at the heart of Davidson's inspiring new book. Using cutting-edge research on the brain, she shows how "attention blindness" has produced one of our society's greatest challenges: while we've all acknowledged the great changes of the digital age, most of us still toil in schools and workplaces designed for the last century. Davidson introduces us to visionaries whose groundbreaking ideas-from schools with curriculums built around video games to companies that train workers using virtual environments-will open the doors to new ways of working and learning. A lively hybrid of Thomas Friedman and Norman Doidge, Now You See It is a refreshingly optimistic argument for a bold embrace of our connected, collaborative future.



(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:08:00 -0400)

Documents a 2003 experiment at Duke University where the author had free iPods issued to the freshman class to see how the device could be used academically, in a report that reveals other technological ideas that are revolutionizing education.

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