HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

From Elvish to Klingon: Exploring Invented Languages

by Michael Adams

Other authors: Judith Hendriks-Hermans (Contributor), Howard Jackson (Contributor), Sjaak Kroon (Contributor), Jeremy Marshall (Contributor), Mark Okrand (Contributor)5 more, James Portnow (Contributor), Suzanne Romaine (Contributor), Arden R. Smith (Contributor), Stephen Watt (Contributor), E. S. C. Weiner (Contributor)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1101198,270 (3.91)2
How are languages invented? Why are they invented? Who uses them? What are the cultural effects of invented languages? This fascinating book looks at all manner of invented languages and explores the origins, purpose, and usage of these curious artefacts of culture. Written by experts in thefield, chapters discuss languages from Esperanto to Klingon and uncover the motives behind their creation, and the outcomes of their existence.Introduction by Michael AdamsLinking all invented languages, Michael Adams explains how creating a language is intimidating work; no one would attempt to invent one unless driven by a serious purpose or aspiration. He explains how the origin and development of each invented language illustrates inventors' and users'dissatisfaction with the language(s) already available to them, and how each invented language expresses one or more of a wide range of purposes and aspirations: political, social, aesthetic, intellectual, and technological.Chapter 1: International Auxiliary Languages by Arden SmithFrom the mythical Language of Adam to Esperanto and Solresol, this chapter looks at the history, linguistics, and significance of international or universal languages (including sign languages).Chapter 2: Invented Vocabularies: Newspeak and Nadsat by Howard JacksonLooking at the invented vocabularies of science fiction, for example 1984's 'Newspeak' and Clockwork Orange's 'Nadsat', this chapter discusses the feasibility of such vocabularies, the plausibility of such lexical change, and the validity of the Sapir-Whorfian echoes heard in such literaryexperiments.Chapter 3: 'Oirish' Inventions: James Joyce, Samuel Beckett, Paul Muldoon by Stephen WattThis chapter looks at literary inventions of another kind, nonsense and semi-nonsense languages, including those used in the works of James Joyce and Samuel Beckett.Chapter 4: Tolkien's Invented Languages by Edmund WeinerFocussing on the work of the accomplished philologist J.R.R. Tolkien, the fifteen languages he created are considered in the context of invented languages of other kinds.Chapter 5: Klingon and other Science Fiction Languages by Marc Okrand, Judith Hendriks-Hermans, and Sjaak KroonKlingon is the most fully developed of fictional languages (besides Tolkien's). Used by many, this chapter explores the speech community of 'Trekkies', alongside other science fiction vocabularies.Chapter 6: Logical Languages by Michael AdamsThis chapter introduces conlangs, 'constructed languages'. For example, Laaden, created to express feminine experience better than 'patriarchal' languages.Chapter 7: Gaming Languages and Language Games by James PortnowLanguages and games are both fundamentally interactive, based on the adoption of arbitrary sign systems, and come with a set of formal rules which can be manipulated to express different outcomes. This being one of the drivers for the popularity of invented languages within the gaming community,James Portnow looks at several gaming languages and language games, such as Gargish, D'ni, Simlish, and Logos.Chapter 8: Revitalized Languages as Invented Languages by Suzanne RomaineThe final chapter looks at language continuation, renewal, revival, and resurrection - in the cases of Gaelic, Welsh, Cornish, and Breton - as well as language regulation.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 2 mentions

Suspect I'm not going to get through the remaining appendices anytime soon. As ever with a collection of essays, some high points and some low points. The chapter on languages in games was rather superficial, the chapter on Tolkien was good, the chapters on Cornish and other revived languages was interesting but could have covered more. ( )
2 vote comixminx | Apr 5, 2013 |
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Michael Adamsprimary authorall editionscalculated
Hendriks-Hermans, JudithContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Jackson, HowardContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Kroon, SjaakContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Marshall, JeremyContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Okrand, MarkContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Portnow, JamesContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Romaine, SuzanneContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Smith, Arden R.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Watt, StephenContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Weiner, E. S. C.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Every year, thousands of English professors in the United States, perhaps around the world, receive a circular offering them 'Shakespeare in the original language'--Klingon, the invented language of a warrior race in the invented future world of the television and film franchise, Star Trek.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

How are languages invented? Why are they invented? Who uses them? What are the cultural effects of invented languages? This fascinating book looks at all manner of invented languages and explores the origins, purpose, and usage of these curious artefacts of culture. Written by experts in thefield, chapters discuss languages from Esperanto to Klingon and uncover the motives behind their creation, and the outcomes of their existence.Introduction by Michael AdamsLinking all invented languages, Michael Adams explains how creating a language is intimidating work; no one would attempt to invent one unless driven by a serious purpose or aspiration. He explains how the origin and development of each invented language illustrates inventors' and users'dissatisfaction with the language(s) already available to them, and how each invented language expresses one or more of a wide range of purposes and aspirations: political, social, aesthetic, intellectual, and technological.Chapter 1: International Auxiliary Languages by Arden SmithFrom the mythical Language of Adam to Esperanto and Solresol, this chapter looks at the history, linguistics, and significance of international or universal languages (including sign languages).Chapter 2: Invented Vocabularies: Newspeak and Nadsat by Howard JacksonLooking at the invented vocabularies of science fiction, for example 1984's 'Newspeak' and Clockwork Orange's 'Nadsat', this chapter discusses the feasibility of such vocabularies, the plausibility of such lexical change, and the validity of the Sapir-Whorfian echoes heard in such literaryexperiments.Chapter 3: 'Oirish' Inventions: James Joyce, Samuel Beckett, Paul Muldoon by Stephen WattThis chapter looks at literary inventions of another kind, nonsense and semi-nonsense languages, including those used in the works of James Joyce and Samuel Beckett.Chapter 4: Tolkien's Invented Languages by Edmund WeinerFocussing on the work of the accomplished philologist J.R.R. Tolkien, the fifteen languages he created are considered in the context of invented languages of other kinds.Chapter 5: Klingon and other Science Fiction Languages by Marc Okrand, Judith Hendriks-Hermans, and Sjaak KroonKlingon is the most fully developed of fictional languages (besides Tolkien's). Used by many, this chapter explores the speech community of 'Trekkies', alongside other science fiction vocabularies.Chapter 6: Logical Languages by Michael AdamsThis chapter introduces conlangs, 'constructed languages'. For example, Laaden, created to express feminine experience better than 'patriarchal' languages.Chapter 7: Gaming Languages and Language Games by James PortnowLanguages and games are both fundamentally interactive, based on the adoption of arbitrary sign systems, and come with a set of formal rules which can be manipulated to express different outcomes. This being one of the drivers for the popularity of invented languages within the gaming community,James Portnow looks at several gaming languages and language games, such as Gargish, D'ni, Simlish, and Logos.Chapter 8: Revitalized Languages as Invented Languages by Suzanne RomaineThe final chapter looks at language continuation, renewal, revival, and resurrection - in the cases of Gaelic, Welsh, Cornish, and Breton - as well as language regulation.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.91)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 2
3.5 1
4 6
4.5 1
5 1

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 163,405,900 books! | Top bar: Always visible