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Doctor Faustus (1594)

by Christopher Marlowe, William Birde (Author), Christopher Marlowe, Samuel Rowley (Author)

Other authors: David Bevington (Editor)

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
4,624702,062 (3.74)217
"Doctor Faustus is a classic; its imaginative boldness and vertiginous ironies have fascinated readers and playgoers alike. But the fact that this play exists in two early versions, printed in 1604 and 1616, has posed formidable problems for critics. How much of either version was written by Marlowe, and which is the more authentic? Is the play orthodox or radically interrogative?" "Michael Keefer's early work helped to establish the current consensus that the 1604 version best preserves Doctor Faustus's original form, and that the 1616 text was censored and revised; the first Broadview edition, praised for its lucid introduction and scholarship, was the first to restore two displaced scenes to their correct place. All competing editions presume that the 1604 text was printed from authorial manuscript, and that the 1616 text is of little substantive value. But in 2006 Keefer's fresh analysis of the evidence showed that the 1604 quarto's Marlovian scenes were printed from a corrupted manuscript, and that the 1616 quarto (though indeed censored and revised) preserves some readings earlier than those of the 1604 text." "This revised and updated Broadview edition offers the best available text of Doctor Faustus. Keefer's critical introduction reconstructs the ideological contexts that shaped and deformed the play, and the text is accompanied by textual and explanatory notes and excerpts from sources."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)
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» See also 217 mentions

English (63)  Italian (2)  German (1)  French (1)  Danish (1)  Spanish (1)  Swedish (1)  All languages (70)
Showing 1-5 of 63 (next | show all)
Igual rescaté varias quotes, se agradece. ( )
  pmesinas | Sep 28, 2022 |
The second play by Christopher Marlow I have read. I had an easier time reading it this time. Nice telling of the story of Faust. ( )
  nx74defiant | Aug 15, 2022 |
Not the best Norton Critical that I've come across. A very spare introduction, and rather short on context considering how much there was going on at the time (though there is a healthy dollop of faustbook). A good comparison is the equivalent edition of The Tempest, which seems to do much more with much less.

Seems to lean rather heavily on Calvinism as context for the play, taking the difference between the faustbook and Doctor Faustus as mostly theological. This is an interesting approach and offers some good insights on the play (and Marlowe's formative years), but the scope is rather narrow for a Norton Critical.

Both the A and B text are provided, naturally with modernized spelling/punctuation. This is not a side-by-side edition: you read them in sequence. Being short, this works fine, and the differences between the two are what make up most of the introduction. I'd recommend supplementing this with the first 3 sections of [b:Lives of Faust: The Faust Theme in Literature and Music: A Reader|7054766|Lives of Faust The Faust Theme in Literature and Music A Reader|Lorna Fitzsimmons|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1381304452s/7054766.jpg|7305946] to get a more complete analysis of the play.

As for the play itself, five stars for anything by Marlowe. ( )
  mkfs | Aug 13, 2022 |
Marlowe’s play followed by only a few years the first translation into English of the medieval legend on which the play is based. In Doctor Faustus Marlowe retells the story of Faust, the doctor-turned-necromancer, who makes a pact with the devil in order to obtain knowledge and power. Both Doctor Faustus and Mephistopheles, who is the devil’s intermediary in the play, are subtly and powerfully portrayed. Marlowe examines Faustus’s grandiose intellectual ambitions, revealing them as futile, self-destructive, and absurd. ( )
  Marcos_Augusto | Jan 14, 2022 |
classic tale of selling one's soul to the devil
  ritaer | Jun 4, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 63 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (124 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Christopher Marloweprimary authorall editionscalculated
Birde, WilliamAuthormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Marlowe, Christophermain authorall editionsconfirmed
Rowley, SamuelAuthormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Bevington, DavidEditorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Barnet, SylvanEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bevington, DavidEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Birde, WilliamAuthorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dürer, AlbrechtCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kaufman, AnthonyIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kocher, Paul H.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kowalski, JakobTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lunt, R. G.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rowley, SamuelAuthorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Seebass, AdolfTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Zarate, OscarIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Chorus: Not marching now in fields of Thrasymene where Mars did mate the Carthafinians, nor sporting in the dalliance of love in courts of kings where state is overturned, nor in the pomp of proud audacious deeds intends our Muse to vaunt his heavenly verse: Only this, Gentlemen, we must perform, the form of Faustus' fortunes good or bad.
Quotations
Faustus: Was this the face that launched a thousand ships
And burnt the topless towers of Ilium?
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Not to be confused with the novel by Thomas Mann.
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Wikipedia in English (1)

"Doctor Faustus is a classic; its imaginative boldness and vertiginous ironies have fascinated readers and playgoers alike. But the fact that this play exists in two early versions, printed in 1604 and 1616, has posed formidable problems for critics. How much of either version was written by Marlowe, and which is the more authentic? Is the play orthodox or radically interrogative?" "Michael Keefer's early work helped to establish the current consensus that the 1604 version best preserves Doctor Faustus's original form, and that the 1616 text was censored and revised; the first Broadview edition, praised for its lucid introduction and scholarship, was the first to restore two displaced scenes to their correct place. All competing editions presume that the 1604 text was printed from authorial manuscript, and that the 1616 text is of little substantive value. But in 2006 Keefer's fresh analysis of the evidence showed that the 1604 quarto's Marlovian scenes were printed from a corrupted manuscript, and that the 1616 quarto (though indeed censored and revised) preserves some readings earlier than those of the 1604 text." "This revised and updated Broadview edition offers the best available text of Doctor Faustus. Keefer's critical introduction reconstructs the ideological contexts that shaped and deformed the play, and the text is accompanied by textual and explanatory notes and excerpts from sources."--BOOK JACKET.

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Penguin Australia

An edition of this book was published by Penguin Australia.

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