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The Andromeda Strain by Michael Crichton
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The Andromeda Strain (1969)

by Michael Crichton

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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7,767102682 (3.66)160
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» See also 160 mentions

English (97)  Spanish (2)  Danish (1)  Hebrew (1)  Italian (1)  All languages (102)
Showing 1-5 of 97 (next | show all)
Although this book was written in 1969, it is remarkably prescient in a number of ways. The only thing that really dates it is the computer technology relying on tapes for storage. The book is really well researched and almost feels like something that could really happen. Most books by Michael Crichton are like that though, they take a relatively simple premise of mankind discovering a thing or force beyond his understanding and trying to combat it with technology or wit.

While I have read other books by Crichton, this one is the earliest one of his works that I have read. It is a true page-turner, with a new thrill coming every minute. It is one of those books that is difficult to put down after the first few pages. ( )
  Floyd3345 | Jun 15, 2019 |
Interesting premise, but ultimately slow and dull. Not a classic. ( )
  miri12 | May 31, 2019 |
Great until it wasn't... ( )
  NormalMostly | May 20, 2019 |
ot Crichton's best work but still an enjoyable read. The story is heavily embedded in science; so, be prepared for a lot of dry scientific information, a lot of which went over my head. Thanks goodness I enjoy the science stuff even when some of it is over my head.

I thought the ending was rather anticlimactic. There was a bit of build up and then we have this ending that felt somewhat unimaginative. I did like the idea of a space born virus and felt the story could have gone so many places that would have been more interesting.

If you like Sci-Fi stories steeped in science, this is the book for you. ( )
  purpledog | May 11, 2019 |
Exciting but dated. ( )
  Matt_B | Nov 9, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 97 (next | show all)

» Add other authors (17 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Crichton, Michaelprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Chris NothNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
The survival value of human intelligence has never been satisfactorily demonstrated. — Jeremy Stone
Increasing vision is increasingly expensive. — R.A. Janek
THIS FILE IS CLASSIFIED TOP SECRET
Examination by unauthorized persons is a criminal offense punishable by fines and imprisonment up to 20 years and $20,000.
DO NOT ACCEPT FROM COURIER IF SEAL IS BROKEN
The courier is required by law to demand your card 7592. He is not permitted to relinquish this file without such proof of identity.
Dedication
for A.C.D., M.D., who first proposed the problem
First words
A man with binoculars.
Quotations
Er is nooit een afdoende bewijs geleverd dat de menselijke intelligentie van waarde is voor de overleving van het ras. (Jeremy Stone) Verruiming van inzicht betekent verhoging van de kosten. (R.A. Janek)
"All yours, Gunner." Wilson did not answer. He dropped his nose, cracked down his flaps, and felt a shudder as the plane sank sickeningly, like a stone, toward the ground. Below him, the area around the town was lighted for hundreds of yards in every direction. He pressed the camera buttons and felt, rather than heard, the vibrating whir of the cameras. For a long moment he continued to fall, and then he shoved the stick forward, and the plane seemed to catch in the air, to grasp, and lift and climb. He had a fleeting glimpse of the main street. He saw bodies, bodies everywhere, spreadeagled, lying in the streets, across cars ... "Jesus," he said. And then he was up, still climbing, bringing the plane around in a slow arc, preparing for the descent into his second run and trying not to think of what he and seen. One of the first rules of air reconnaisssance was "Ignore the scenery"; analysis and evaluation were not the job of the pilot. That was left to the experts, and pilots who forgot this, who became too interested in what they were photgraphing, got into trouble. Usually they crashed.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
This is the book The Andromeda Strain by Michael Crichton. Please do not combine with any of the film adaptations.
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Information from the Dutch Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
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Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Haiku summary
Space germ kills humans.
Gather team of researchers!
We only sent four?
(benscripps)

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0060541814, Mass Market Paperback)

Some biologists speculate that if we ever make contact with extraterrestrials, those life forms are likely to be--like most life on earth--one-celled or smaller creatures, more comparable to bacteria than little green men. And even though such organisms would not likely be able to harm humans, the possibility exists that first contact might be our last.

That's the scientific supposition that Michael Crichton formulates and follows out to its conclusion in his excellent debut novel, The Andromeda Strain.

A Nobel-Prize-winning bacteriologist, Jeremy Stone, urges the president to approve an extraterrestrial decontamination facility to sterilize returning astronauts, satellites, and spacecraft that might carry an "unknown biologic agent." The government agrees, almost too quickly, to build the top-secret Wildfire Lab in the desert of Nevada. Shortly thereafter, unbeknownst to Stone, the U.S. Army initiates the "Scoop" satellite program, an attempt to actively collect space pathogens for use in biological warfare. When Scoop VII crashes a couple years later in the isolated Arizona town of Piedmont, the Army ends up getting more than it asked for.

The Andromeda Strain follows Stone and rest of the scientific team mobilized to react to the Scoop crash as they scramble to understand and contain a strange and deadly outbreak. Crichton's first book may well be his best; it has an earnestness that is missing from his later, more calculated thrillers. --Paul Hughes

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:22:07 -0400)

(see all 10 descriptions)

The United States government is given a warning by the pre-eminent biophysicists in the country: current sterilization procedures applied to returning space probes may be inadequate to guarantee uncontaminated re-entry to the atmosphere. Two years later, seventeen satellites are sent into the outer fringes of space to "collect organisms and dust for study." One of them falls to earth, landing in a desolate area of Arizona. Twelve miles from the landing site, in the town of Piedmont, a shocking discovery is made: the streets are littered with the dead bodies of the town's inhabitants, as if they dropped dead in their tracks.… (more)

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