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And the Mountains Echoed

by Khaled Hosseini

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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6,3943201,291 (4.02)236
Presents a story inspired by human love, how people take care of one another, and how choices resonate through subsequent generations. Afghanistan, 1952. Abdullah and his sister Pari live with their father and step-mother in the small village of Shadbagh. Their father, Saboor, is constantly in search of work and they struggle together through poverty and brutal winters. To Adbullah, Pari, as beautiful and sweet-natured as the fairy for which she was named, is everything.… (more)
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Showing 1-5 of 279 (next | show all)
And the Mountains Echoed by Khaled Hosseini And the Mountains Echoed by Khaled Hosseini
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I liked this book but I found it a little difficult to follow all the characters at times. Hosseini weaves a complicated fabric of the past and present and how each life has progressed. I would have liked to have known more about the lives of some of the main characters and the one fault of the book is that it seems to jump around a lot from times and places and leaves you somewhat dissatisfied and wanting to know more ( )
  Arena800 | Sep 20, 2022 |
I’m not sure I have adequate skill to review this book. It has left me breathless, awed and amazingly emotional. I knew we were headed for a terrible event when Abdullah’s father tells him the story of the div, but I could never have imagined all the twists and turns this story was going to take. I cannot say how pleased I am that Mr. Hosseini could not only imagine them but could put them into a book so masterfully.

There are several stories going on inside this novel. They are all connected in some way, but each of them is able to stand on its own and has its own importance within the overall tale. It is a book about human connections, those between Abdullah and his sister, Pari, but also those between people who are not related by blood, but only by love or commitment. Many of these people think they are doing what is for the best, when it is obvious that this cannot be so, and many find that they are not up to the sacrifices that are demanded of them by the circumstances life throws at them.

--no one will come to claim him. No one will grieve. No one will remember. He will die where he lived, in the cracks.

I think this quotation might sum up much of what each of these characters fears most, that they will be disconnected from those other beings around them, misunderstood, go unnoticed or at the least not be noticed for who they truly are.

The book opens with this quote from Rumi:
Out beyond ideas
of wrongdoing and rightdoing,
there is a field.
I’ll meet you there.


This will be a crowded field.

I have had both [b:The Kite Runner|77203|The Kite Runner|Khaled Hosseini|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1484565687s/77203.jpg|3295919] and [b:A Thousand Splendid Suns|128029|A Thousand Splendid Suns|Khaled Hosseini|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1345958969s/128029.jpg|3271379] sitting on my bookshelf for years. I kept promising to read them but finding reasons to pass them over for other reads. That will not happen in 2018. This novel is evidence enough for me to know that I am only cheating myself when I fail to read every word Hosseini has written.
( )
  mattorsara | Aug 11, 2022 |
Bookclub book recommended by Gail
( )
  PatLibrary123 | Aug 9, 2022 |
"I suspect the truth is that we are waiting, all of us, against insurmountable odds, for something extraordinary to happen to us."

"You want a story and I will tell you one," is the opening line of this multi-generational family saga. It starts in 1952 with an impoverished Afghani father entertaining his children with a fable the night before they embark on a journey through the mountains of the book's title to Kabul, a fable that will still echo some sixty years later.

In the fable a div, or demon, forces a father to a make terrible choice, a similar choice that the storyteller himself must also face.

One of many characters states "A story is like a moving train, no matter where you hop onboard, you are bound to reach your destination sooner or later." This is really very apt for this novel. Hosseini doesn't restrict the narrative to any single route, instead it flips from various characters, eras, countries and even continents as it weaves a series of inter-connected tales. Many of these tales initially seem like branch lines going nowhere other than to take the reader away from the two central siblings but eventually each tale helps the reader get to where they want to go, if not necessarily in the route they had expected.

Throughout the novel there is grief, punishment, sadness and sorrow but there are also flashes of joy, happiness and atonement as it wends its way to its touching conclusion. But perhaps the over-riding emotion is guilt. How the decisions of parents can affect the lives of their offspring.

This isn't a book where the Taliban are particularly prominent, rather the author looks at Afghanistan's relationship with the wider world; what its traumas have done to those who remain and also to those who leave. One that asks what the rich can do do for the poor?

I found this a beautifully written and thought provoking read that not only took me on a roller-coaster of emotions but also gave me a brief insight into this conflicted and complex country and its people. As such I would highly recommend it. ( )
  PilgrimJess | Mar 26, 2022 |
The individual stories are gripping, and have many layers, however this book has stumbling blocks. There are some beautiful paragraphs.

My main gripe with this book is the composition. There are too many changes in protagonist, place and times. It took me usually a couple of paragraphs into a certain voice speaking before I understood who was talking. It was often someone who was an "extra" from a previous piece. This made the book very fragmented and difficult to navigate. It would have been better if there was a clear indication of which character is the protagonist of each story.

The second problem is that there is no real plot, just a telling of the history of a family and the people who touched the lives of the different family member. The story just end in the present, without real solution or point.

I loved The Kiterunner and A Thousand Splendid Suns, there were solid coherent books. This one is not quite up to Khaled Hosseini's usual heights. Did his publisher push him too hard for a new bestseller. Why didn't the editor make him get the kinks out? ( )
  Marietje.Halbertsma | Jan 9, 2022 |
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» Add other authors (2 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Khaled Hosseiniprimary authorall editionscalculated
Ahrens, HenningTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hansen, W.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Out beyond ideas
of wrongdoing and rightdoing,
there is a field.
I'll meet you there.
Jelaluddin Rumi, 13th century
Dedication
This book is dedicated to Haris and Farah,
both the noor of my eyes, and to my father,
who would have been proud
For Elaine
First words
So, then.  You want a story and I will tell you one.  But just the one.
Quotations
I suspect the truth is that we are waiting, all of us, against insurmountable odds, for something extraordinary to happen to us.
J'aurais du etre plus gentille--I should have been more kind. That is something a person will never regret.
Beauty is an enormous, unmerited gift given randomly, stupidly.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Wikipedia in English (1)

Presents a story inspired by human love, how people take care of one another, and how choices resonate through subsequent generations. Afghanistan, 1952. Abdullah and his sister Pari live with their father and step-mother in the small village of Shadbagh. Their father, Saboor, is constantly in search of work and they struggle together through poverty and brutal winters. To Adbullah, Pari, as beautiful and sweet-natured as the fairy for which she was named, is everything.

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