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Red Rising by Pierce Brown
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Red Rising

by Pierce Brown

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: The Red Rising Trilogy (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,7322523,080 (3.95)174
  1. 50
    The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins (wifilibrarian)
    wifilibrarian: Both feature themes of oppression, caste systems, large divides between have-nots and the haves. Televised young adults fighting.
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» See also 174 mentions

English (252)  Hungarian (1)  All languages (253)
Showing 1-5 of 252 (next | show all)
I would not recommend the audiobook. The narrator has a thick accent that makes it hard to follow.

This book had some really poignant moments but for the most part it was meh. I didn't care for the protagonist, Darrow, much. I did really like some of the secondary characters, but most of them end up dead.

Not sure if I'll read the next one or not. ( )
  Catsysta | Aug 5, 2018 |
I think it is telling that I started this book over a month ago by listening to it as an audiobook on a car trip, and even though I was only forty pages from the end when I pulled into my home driveway, I proceeded to not bother reading the ending for weeks. The story is okay, but it just seems to be a mishmash of every YA dystopian novel for the past couple decades. And the protagonist is so pathetic at the start and much of the middle, that he is sort of hard to warm up to. I highly doubt I'll read the other books in the series. ( )
  villemezbrown | Jul 28, 2018 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
Darrow is a Red, the lowest position in a color-represented caste society. He knows his life is tough but this year things are about to change. This year, he's going to win the Laurel and the rest of the Lambda clan will finally get the chance to know what it feels like to not go hungry for once. Except, the government has other plans and despite being the true winners, the Gammas win the Laurel like they do every year.

In an attempt to change the world he knows for the better, Darrow infiltrates the Golds by changing his looks. He easily passes the test to get into the Gold academy, but things begin to change dramatically when the selected group is left to conquer one another on the school grounds. Alliances are made and broken and those who you trust might not be the ones who truly have your back. Brown keeps the reader guessing what will happen next and what happens in one chapter can be completely upended in the next.

I loved how much Darrow's decisions affected him and how his choices shaped him throughout the book. I thought his constant yearning for his dead wife was going to be annoying when it was repeatedly brought up. Instead, it was heartbreaking - like opening a scab before it's had a chance to fully heal. Her death is a constant reminder of what he needs to do and why he can't waste the opportunity he's been given.

This book doesn't sugar coat its violence. It's raw and real, and it's laid out before you in all of it's glorious mess for you to see and feel. People die and it's brutal and twisted and Brown doesn't shy away from such things. What starts off as a game quickly escalates to a battle of survival. Brown does an amazing job of showing just how easy and quick it is for a group of civilized people to turn into a bunch of savage barbarians.

As Darrow would say, I “bloodydamn” loved this book. Red Rising is the kind of novel where you think you can read a chapter or two before bed. Except “just one more” chapter turns into five and before you know it, it's 2 o'clock in the morning. Brown's writing is addicting and pulls you into his world, making it hard to put it down once you start reading.

On the outside, Red Rising looks like just another sci-fi dystopian novel. Comparisons to The Hunger Games, Ender's Game and Divergent are merely the tip of the iceberg. Brown's world is dark and gritty and is not to be missed. ( )
  brismel | Jul 27, 2018 |
Received a free copy of this as a Goodreads giveaway and really wanted to like it. Unfortunately I have to call it two chapters in. I have better things to do and read than yet more science fiction by white straight men for white straight men. ( )
  Jeeps | Jul 26, 2018 |
I have had a pre-published copy of Red Rising for several years and just wasn’t interested in reading it even though I’ve only heard great things about it. Our tennis coach mentioned wanting to read the rest of the trilogy. Intrigued, I pulled the book out to read. I Loved It! I read the trilogy in a few days. Then, I discovered it NOT a trilogy. There’s a fourth book and a fifth one about to come out. Stress!

It took me a while to get into Red Rising, so here’s a warning. On page 60, I was finally fairly interested, by page 100, I was hooked! There are many castes, called colors. Darrow is below ground on Mars as a Red, lowest of the low. He is preparing Mars for habitation as his ancestors have done for a very long time. It’s a hard life with death always looming and no rights for anything but it’s worth it. The future will be a better place. When his wife is sentenced to death, Darrow vows revenge. He discovers everything is a lie. Mars IS inhabited. He is recruited by the Rebels to help change society. To do so, Darrow must join the enemy--become them and destroy them from the inside out. He becomes the highest color--a Gold. It’s here where he learns, fights, and plans.

Red Rising takes place at the Academy some selected Golds attend--it’s a brutal place, prepping these Golds to be the fighters and leaders of the future. Golden Son (book 2) goes to the next phase. Darrow is now placed with his Gold and learning to exist in the Gold Society. Bear in mind, his life is one of the military, so to speak. He learns combat, strategy, the value of power, and what it takes to stay on top. Can you sacrifice yourself and others? Of course, he made enemies in book 1 who reappear in each novel. Morning Star is the ousted Darrow trying to change society.

I’m avoiding saying too much, but I was hooked! I thoroughly enjoyed reading these. They are not for the faint-hearted. There is violence, but it is science fiction. Every planet and moon in the solar system is inhabited. It’s hard to keep that many people and cultures happy. If you like science fiction (which isn’t a genre I choose often) or adventure, read these books. ( )
  acargile | Jul 17, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 252 (next | show all)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Pierce Brownprimary authorall editionscalculated
Reynolds, Tim GerardNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Dedication
To Father, who taught me to walk
First words
I would have lived in peace. But my enemies brought me war.
Quotations
I was forged in the bowels of this hard world.
Then you must live for more.
"So this kid is what? A predestined Alexander? A Caesar? A Genghis? A Wiggin?" I ask. "This is slagging nonsense."
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0345539788, Hardcover)

Pierce Brown’s relentlessly entertaining debut channels the excitement of The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins and Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card.

“I live for the dream that my children will be born free,” she says. “That they will be what they like. That they will own the land their father gave them.”
 
“I live for you,” I say sadly.
 
Eo kisses my cheek. “Then you must live for more.”

 
Darrow is a miner and a Red, a member of the lowest caste in the color-coded society of the future. Like his fellow Reds, he digs all day, believing that he and his people are making the surface of the planet livable for future generations. Darrow has never seen the sky.
 
Yet he spends his life willingly, knowing that his blood and sweat will one day result in a better future for his children.
 
But Darrow and his kind have been betrayed. Soon he discovers that humanity already reached the surface generations ago. Vast cities and sprawling parks spread across the planet. Darrow and Reds like him are nothing more than slaves to a decadent ruling class.
 
Inspired by a longing for justice, and driven by the memory of lost love, Darrow joins a resistance group in order to infiltrate the ruling class and destroy society from within. He will stop at nothing to bring down his enemies . . . even if it means he has to become one of them to do so.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 17:59:49 -0400)

Darrow is a Red, a member of the lowest caste in the color-coded society of the future. Like his fellow Reds, he works all day, believing that he and his people are making the surface of Mars livable for future generations. Yet he spends his life willingly, knowing that his blood and sweat will one day result in a better world for his children. But Darrow and his kind have been betrayed. Soon he discovers that humanity reached the surface generations ago. Vast cities and sprawling parks spread across the planet. Darrow and Reds like him, are nothing more than slaves to a decadent ruling class. Inspired by a longing for justice, and driven by the memory of lost love, Darrow sacrifices everything to infiltrate the legendary Institute, a proving ground for the dominant Gold caste, where the next generation of humanity's overlords struggle for power. He will be forced to compete for his life and the very future of civilization against the best and most brutal of Society's ruling class. There, he will stop at nothing to bring down his enemies ... even if it means he has to become one of them to do so.… (more)

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