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Do No Harm: Stories of Life, Death, and Brain Surgery (2014)

by Henry Marsh

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,1034518,412 (4.06)83
"Neurosurgeon Henry Marsh reveals the fierce joy of operating, the profoundly moving triumphs, the harrowing disasters, the haunting regrets, and the moments of black humor that characterize a brain surgeon's life. If you believe that brain surgery is a precise and exquisite craft, practiced by calm and detached surgeons, this ... brutally honest account will make you think again"--Amazon.com.… (more)
  1. 00
    What Doctors Feel: How Emotions Affect the Practice of Medicine by Danielle Ofri (fountainoverflows)
    fountainoverflows: While Marsh's book is ostensibly a collection of stories about experiences with neurosurgery patients, there is a great deal to be gleaned about doctors'--and, in particular, surgeons' emotional states, especially when the diagnosis is very grim.… (more)
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» See also 83 mentions

English (40)  Spanish (3)  Catalan (1)  Danish (1)  All languages (45)
Showing 1-5 of 40 (next | show all)
An odd book describing in detail brain surgery operations with risky outcomes, and the experience of the surgeon behind the work. The person, author, is by far a perfect human but is forced to act in a role that is beyond the everyday, and expect to be responsible for all sorts of trouble for his patients as alternative to death. You get something strange from this book, a sense of big themes of life, how culture handles them, the humanity of disease and the strange machine that wraps around the medical profession. ( )
  yates9 | Feb 28, 2024 |
Interesting look at neurosurgery. ( )
  cathy.lemann | Mar 21, 2023 |
Al estilo de Oliver Sacks. No querés dejar de leer. Emotivo. ( )
  Alvaritogn | Jul 1, 2022 |
A really engaging book that manages to makes its complex subject matter (brain surgery) accessible and fascinating. Marsh throws in a fair amount of commentary on the state of the modern NHS but his writing is never preachy and the book overall is satisfying and thought provoking. His meditations on death and the question of whether we should avoid it at all costs are especially interesting. ( )
  whatmeworry | Apr 9, 2022 |
一開始當作(又一本)神外故事會看,但中段開始基調逐漸改變,作者開心見誠地談論自己的失敗,剖析自己遇到無法救治的病人或者手術失敗的病例時的所思所想,還反覆吐槽NHS管理得如何官僚死板,讓普通人一窺醫生這一職業背後的壓力和煩惱。 印象比較深刻的章節,一是作者自述其公學牛津drop out gap完回校再轉行的游刃有餘白人中產人生(……),二是官僚制度無論在蘇聯解體後的烏克蘭還是在倫敦都死死把控住治病救人的醫院,三是作者反思自己年輕時因自大而手術失敗、使病人成爲植物人,印象最爲深刻的四則是作者照料臨終母親、以及散見於各章節的對死亡的思考。看完很强烈的一個感受是,in Cantonese,人命真係好化學…… ( )
  puripuri | Sep 9, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 40 (next | show all)
As a young doctor just starting out, Henry Marsh watched a neurosurgeon operate on a woman’s brain, going after a dangerous aneurysm that could rupture and kill her. This kind of surgery — taking place several inches inside the patient’s head — was perilous, and often compared, as he writes in his riveting new memoir, to bomb disposal work, “though the bravery required is of a different kind as it is the patient’s life that is at risk and not the surgeon’s.”

There was “the chase,” as the surgeon stalked his prey deep within the brain, then “the climax as he caught the aneurysm, trapped it, and obliterated it with a glittering, spring-loaded titanium clip, saving the patient’s life.” More than that, Dr. Marsh goes on, “the operation involved the brain, the mysterious substrate of all thought and feeling, of all that was important in human life — a mystery, it seemed to me, as great as the stars at night and the universe around us. The operation was elegant, delicate, dangerous and full of profound meaning. What could be finer, I thought, than to be a neurosurgeon?”

Dr. Marsh would become one of Britain’s foremost neurosurgeons, and in this unflinching book, “Do No Harm,” he gives us an extraordinarily intimate, compassionate and sometimes frightening understanding of his vocation. . . . .
 

» Add other authors (27 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Henry Marshprimary authorall editionscalculated
Barclay, JimNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Grlic, OlgaCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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"Neurosurgeon Henry Marsh reveals the fierce joy of operating, the profoundly moving triumphs, the harrowing disasters, the haunting regrets, and the moments of black humor that characterize a brain surgeon's life. If you believe that brain surgery is a precise and exquisite craft, practiced by calm and detached surgeons, this ... brutally honest account will make you think again"--Amazon.com.

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