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Brown Girl Dreaming

by Jacqueline Woodson

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
4,2083562,639 (4.41)267
Biography & Autobiography. Juvenile Nonfiction. Sociology. HTML:A New York Times Bestseller and National Book Award Winner

Jacqueline Woodson, the acclaimed author of
Red at the Bone, tells the moving story of her childhood in mesmerizing verse.
 
Raised in South Carolina and New York, Woodson always felt halfway home in each place. In vivid poems, she shares what it was like to grow up as an African American in the 1960s and 1970s, living with the remnants of Jim Crow and her growing awareness of the Civil Rights movement. Touching and powerful, each poem is both accessible and emotionally charged, each line a glimpse into a childâ??s soul as she searches for her place in the world. Woodsonâ??s eloquent poetry also reflects the joy of finding her voice through writing stories, despite the fact that she struggled with reading as a child. Her love of stories inspired her and stayed with her, creating the first sparks of the gifted writer she was to become.
 
A National Book Award Winner
A Newbery Honor Book

A Coretta Scott King Award Winner
Praise for Jacqueline Woodson:
Ms. Woodson writes with a sure understanding of the thoughts of young people, offering a poetic, eloquent narrative that is not simply a story . . . but a mature exploration of grown-up issues and self-discovery.â?ťâ??The New York Times Book Revie
… (more)
  1. 10
    Autobiography of a Family Photo by Jacqueline Woodson (susanbooks)
    susanbooks: Autobiography of a Familly Photo is a prose novel and stands beautifully on its own. Read alongside Brown Girl Dreaming, the earlier book seems like the nightmare, R-rated version of the later one. Both are stunning.
  2. 00
    The Mighty Miss Malone by Christopher Paul Curtis (Anonymous user)
  3. 00
    Coaltown Jesus by Ron Koertge (Ciruelo)
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» See also 267 mentions

English (354)  Spanish (1)  All languages (355)
Showing 1-5 of 354 (next | show all)
Brown Girl Dreaming is a book that recollects the childhood of the author Jacqueline Woodson and is a story of how she grew up the struggles she and her family went through along with the reason she got into writing. The story is powerful and conveys many messages that can inspire people. The book is a must read for all middle school or above aged students/young adults. The book is a free verse poem/autobiography of the authors life and focusing mainly on her experiences and the things she remembers growing up.
  cowscanswim | Jul 25, 2023 |
Woodson's book of poetry is autobiographical and poignant. She uses moments as scenes and asides, and the narrative loses nothing for it. This is my first long-form poetry narrative, and I love it.

Woodson covers her family in Ohio, S. Carolina, and New York City, the land, her siblings, her feelings of growing up, discovering her gift for writing, the relationships that are compliated by money, politics, religion. The whole thing is super-honest, well-written, and joyful. ( )
  MIsaacson | Jul 11, 2023 |
Brown Girl Dream is many beautiful things but ultimately it is the story of a writer and how she found her voice. Written in poem form, Woodson brings her story to vivid life through short vignettes of childhood. This book is great for reluctant readers and an inspiration for young aspiring writers. A must read for everyone! ( )
  Chanicole | Jul 6, 2023 |
Woodson's memoir in verse tells her story of growing up in the 1960s and 1970s. Woodson is born in Ohio but her family moves to Greenville, South Carolina to live with her grandparents when she's very young. Despite the racial prejudice and segregation, Woodson comes to love Greenville. Later the family moves to Brooklyn where young Jacqueline meets her best friend Maria. In addition to a coming of age story the narrative deals with the Civil Rights Movement, the family's Jehovah Witness faith, and an uncle who goes to prison and converts to Islam. The chapters are short vignettes that convey images through poetic language. ( )
  Othemts | Jun 28, 2023 |
This is a beautiful way to tell a memoir - in memories, scenes, senses and emotions. Please write all memoirs like this or do not write them at all. Thank you. ( )
  Kiramke | Jun 27, 2023 |
Showing 1-5 of 354 (next | show all)

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Woodson, Jacquelineprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Farrokhzad, Athenasecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Epigraph
Hold fast to dreams/For if dreams die/Life is a broken-winged bird/That cannot fly.

Hold fast to dreams/For when dreams go/Life is a barren field/Frozen with snow.--Langston Hughes
Dedication
This book is for my family--past, present and future.  With love.
First words
I am born on a Tuesday at University Hospital Columbus, Ohio, USA--a country caught between Black and White.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Wikipedia in English (1)

Biography & Autobiography. Juvenile Nonfiction. Sociology. HTML:A New York Times Bestseller and National Book Award Winner

Jacqueline Woodson, the acclaimed author of
Red at the Bone, tells the moving story of her childhood in mesmerizing verse.
 
Raised in South Carolina and New York, Woodson always felt halfway home in each place. In vivid poems, she shares what it was like to grow up as an African American in the 1960s and 1970s, living with the remnants of Jim Crow and her growing awareness of the Civil Rights movement. Touching and powerful, each poem is both accessible and emotionally charged, each line a glimpse into a childâ??s soul as she searches for her place in the world. Woodsonâ??s eloquent poetry also reflects the joy of finding her voice through writing stories, despite the fact that she struggled with reading as a child. Her love of stories inspired her and stayed with her, creating the first sparks of the gifted writer she was to become.
 
A National Book Award Winner
A Newbery Honor Book

A Coretta Scott King Award Winner
Praise for Jacqueline Woodson:
Ms. Woodson writes with a sure understanding of the thoughts of young people, offering a poetic, eloquent narrative that is not simply a story . . . but a mature exploration of grown-up issues and self-discovery.â?ťâ??The New York Times Book Revie

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