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On the Soul by Aristotle
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On the Soul

by Aristotle

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Showing 4 of 4
This was a solid Aristotelian text. I thought that it was quite interesting the way that Aristotle conceptualized the soul and used his owns powers of deduction to explain its occurrence and the meaning behind it. Overall, a satisfying read. ( )
  DanielSTJ | Dec 24, 2018 |
A short but dense text. This work, along with Plato's Republic, have greatly shaped how psychologists have frameworked their understanding of the mind for the past 2000+ years. ( )
  neverstopreading | Apr 3, 2018 |
Okay, Aristotle basically came up with this whole "soul" deal, and it's another trophy on his wall, for sure. But better than that: He also came up with the whole five-part division of the senses into visual, aural, olfactory, tactile, and gustatory. In this book! ( )
1 vote MeditationesMartini | Dec 3, 2009 |
A nice review of the literature and then a scientific, but abstract, discussion about the things the soul might be -- parts vs. not, a cause of motion vs. not, a source of deliberation or not. ( )
  jpsnow | May 26, 2008 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Aristotleprimary authorall editionscalculated
Apostle, Hippocrates G.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lawson-Tancred, HughTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ross, W. D.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ross, W. D.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Cognition is in our eyes a thing of beauty and worth, and this is true of one cognition more than another, either because it is exact or because it relates to more important and remarkable objects.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0140444718, Paperback)

For the Pre-Socratic philosophers the soul was the source of movement and sensation, while for Plato it was the seat of being, metaphysically distinct from the body that it was forced temporarily to inhabit. Plato's student Aristotle was determined to test the truth of both these beliefs against the emerging sciences of logic and biology. His examination of the huge variety of living organisms the enormous range of their behaviour, their powers and their perceptual sophistication convinced him of the inadequacy both of a materialist reduction and of a Platonic sublimation of the soul. In De Anima, he sought to set out his theory of the soul as the ultimate reality of embodied form and produced both a masterpiece of philosophical insight and a psychology of perennially fascinating subtlety.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:14:45 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

For the Pre-Socratic philosophers the soul was the source of movement and sensation, while for Plato it was the seat of being, metaphysically distinct from the body that it was forced temporarily to inhabit. Plato s student Aristotle was determined to test the truth of both these beliefs against the emerging sciences of logic and biology. His examination of the huge variety of living organisms the enormous range of their behaviour, their powers and their perceptual sophistication convinced him of the inadequacy both of a materialist reduction and of a Platonic sublimation of the soul. In De Anima, he sought to set out his theory of the soul as the ultimate reality of embodied form and produced both a masterpiece of philosophical insight and a psychology of perennially fascinating subtlety.

» see all 2 descriptions

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Penguin Australia

An edition of this book was published by Penguin Australia.

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